America A Narrative History (Vol. 1) 10th Edition, Kindle Edition by David E. Shi – Test Bank

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America A Narrative History (Vol. 1) 10th Edition, Kindle Edition by David E. Shi – Test Bank

CHAPTER 06: STRENGTHENING THE NEW NATION

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. By raising taxes in the early 1780s, the Confederation was able to reduce the national debt.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 248

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.

TOP:   A Loose Alliance of States (II.A)

 

  1. George Washington recognized Shays’s Rebellion as an indicator of the need for a stronger form

of government.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 255

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.                                TOP:              Shays’s Rebellion (III.A)

 

  1. Delegates to the Constitutional Convention sharply debated whether to establish a monarchy or

a republic.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 258

OBJ:   Analyze the political innovations that the 1787 Constitutional Convention developed for the new nation.           TOP:              Drafting the Constitution (IV.C)

 

  1. The New Jersey Plan proposed keeping a unicameral legislature with equal representation for each state.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 258

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              The Virginia and New Jersey Plans (IV.D)

 

  1. The Supreme Court has final interpretive power over the Constitution.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 261

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              The Judiciary (IV.H)

 

  1. Under the Constitution, each slave would count as one person for purposes of representation, but

as only half a person for taxation.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 262

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              Slavery (IV.J)

 

  1. The Constitution mentioned the word “slave” (or “slavery”) eighteen times.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 262

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              Slavery (IV.J)

 

  1. Anti-Federalists favored a decentralized federal system of government.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 265

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              Choosing Sides (V.A)

 

  1. George Washington was appointed president without any kind of election process.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 270

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              The First President (VI.A)

 

  1. The Bill of Rights originally consisted of twelve amendments to the Constitution.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 272

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              The Bill of Rights (VI.C)

 

  1. On the issue of the assumption of state debts, James Madison agreed with Alexander Hamilton.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 276

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              Sectional Differences (VII.C)

 

  1. According to Alexander Hamilton, the United States needed a national bank to provide a stable currency and act as an engine of prosperity.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 277

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              A National Bank (VII.D)

 

  1. The XYZ affair came about as part of the so-called Quasi War with France that Adams inherited

as president.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 294

OBJ:   Examine how attitudes toward Great Britain and France shaped American politics in the late eighteenth century.           TOP:              The War with France (XI.A)

 

  1. Conflicts with Britain and France in the 1790s created a spirit of national unity.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 298

OBJ:   Examine how attitudes toward Great Britain and France shaped American politics in the late eighteenth century.           TOP:              A New Era (XI.D)

 

  1. The partisan divisions of the 1790s ended the friendship of Adams and Jefferson for an extended period.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 299

OBJ:   Examine how attitudes toward Great Britain and France shaped American politics in the late eighteenth century.           TOP:              A New Era (XI.D)

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. The phrase “Critical Period” refers to:
a. the time of the Revolutionary War
b. the summer the Constitution was written
c. America under the Articles of Confederation
d. George Washington’s presidency
e. the years of tension over British taxes

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 247

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.

TOP:   The Confederation Government (II)                                          MSC:   Understanding

 

  1. Which one of the following gave the Confederation government the most trouble?
a. finances d. postal service
b. Indian affairs e. immigration policy
c. land policy

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 247

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.

TOP:   The Confederation Government (II)                                          MSC:   Understanding

 

  1. Under the Articles of Confederation, western lands would be:
a. divided up among the existing states
b. free of slavery
c. recognized as belonging to the Indians
d. owned by the national government
e. extended to the Pacific

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 249

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.                                TOP:              Land Policy (II.B)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The 640-acre sections created by the Land Ordinance of 1785:
a. would be given to settlers for free
b. raised enough money to pay the national debt
c. would be reserved for veterans of the Revolution
d. would be sold by local banks
e. were part of six-square-mile townships

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 250

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.                                TOP:              Land Policy (II.B)

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which of the following was NOT part of the Northwest Ordinance?
a. Slavery was prohibited in the territory above the Ohio River.
b. Statehood was allowed when a territory had a population of 60,000 people.
c. Religious freedom was guaranteed in a “bill of rights.”
d. New states formed from the Northwest Territory promised that Indian land would never be taken from them without their approval.
e. Territorial governors were to be chosen by Congress.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 250

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.

TOP:   The Northwest Ordinance (II.C)     MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. The Northwest Ordinance of 1787:
a. banned slavery in the Northwest
b. made Ohio and Indiana states immediately
c. established colonies in the Ohio Valley
d. denied self-government to that region
e. provided for joint occupation of that area with the British

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 250

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.

TOP:   The Northwest Ordinance (II.C)     MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. After the Revolutionary War, American trade with Britain:
a. was illegal
b. was limited to the West Indies
c. resumed, but without access to the West Indies
d. was minimal
e. was unrestricted

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 252

OBJ:   Examine how attitudes toward Great Britain and France shaped American politics in the late eighteenth century.           TOP:              Trade and the Economy (II.E)                   MSC:  Applying

 

  1. One serious economic problem under the Articles of Confederation was:
a. a scarcity of good farmland
b. shortage of “hard money”
c. the impossibility of obtaining credit
d. excessively high income taxes
e. low wages caused by an oversupply of labor

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 253

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.                                TOP:              Scarce Money (II.F)

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Shays’s Rebellion was led by:
a. merchants d. indebted farmers
b. factory workers e. ambitious politicians
c. bankers

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 254

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.                                TOP:              Shays’s Rebellion (III.A)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Shays’s Rebellion broke out in:
a. Boston d. Rhode Island
b. New York City e. Pennsylvania
c. Massachusetts

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 254

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.                                TOP:              Shays’s Rebellion (III.A)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Shays’s Rebellion:
a. spread to several northern states
b. was supported by George Washington and other elite figures
c. was repressed by state militia
d. resulted in massive bloodshed and property destruction
e. made Americans more fearful of strong central government

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Pages 254-255

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.                                TOP:              Shays’s Rebellion (III.A)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. After Shays’s Rebellion:
a. Massachusetts was governed by martial law
b. farmers throughout America were watched by local safety committees
c. England prepared for the possibility of resuming the war
d. there were numerous calls promoting a stronger central government
e. taxes were increased

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 255

OBJ:   Identify the achievements and shortcomings of the Confederate government and how they contributed to the creation of the Constitution.                                TOP:              Shays’s Rebellion (III.A)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The convention, which assembled in May 1787, was supposed to:
a. write a new constitution
b. address the country’s financial crisis
c. revise the Articles of Confederation
d. nominate someone for president
e. discuss better trade relations with Britain

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 255

OBJ:   Analyze the political innovations that the 1787 Constitutional Convention developed for the new nation.           TOP:              The “Crisis Is Arrived” (IV.A)                  MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The delegates who met:
a. included John Adams and Thomas Jefferson
b. tended to be elderly
c. wanted a weaker central government
d. included many participants in the Revolution
e. arrived knowing what they wanted

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 256

OBJ:   Analyze the political innovations that the 1787 Constitutional Convention developed for the new nation.           TOP:              The Constitutional Convention (IV.B)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The convention’s most gifted political philosopher and the man who emerged as its central figure was:
a. Alexander Hamilton d. Patrick Henry
b. George Washington e. James Madison
c. Benjamin Franklin

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 257

OBJ:   Analyze the political innovations that the 1787 Constitutional Convention developed for the new nation.           TOP:              Drafting the Constitution (IV.C)                MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Madison’s Virginia Plan:
a. would create a president for life
b. would create a two-house Congress
c. was most favored by the small states
d. would simply amend the Articles of Confederation
e. would abolish the state governments

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 258

OBJ:   Analyze the political innovations that the 1787 Constitutional Convention developed for the new nation.           TOP:              The Virginia and New Jersey Plans (IV.D)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The Great Compromise:
a. was negotiated by Benjamin Franklin
b. showed the South’s determination to protect slavery
c. listed the explicit powers of Congress
d. created a four-year term for president
e. settled the question of congressional representation

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 259

OBJ:   Analyze the political innovations that the 1787 Constitutional Convention developed for the new nation.           TOP:              The Three Branches of Government (IV.E)

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. The Founding Fathers viewed the most democratic branch of the government as the:
a. presidency d. cabinet
b. Senate e. House of Representatives
c. Supreme Court

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 259

OBJ:   Analyze the political innovations that the 1787 Constitutional Convention developed for the new nation.           TOP:              The Legislature (IV.F)         MSC:              Evaluating

 

  1. According to the Constitution, the president has the authority to do all of the following EXCEPT:
a. veto acts of Congress
b. resign and choose his successor
c. serve a four-year term
d. act as commander in chief of the armed forces
e. appoint diplomats and judges

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 260

OBJ:   Analyze the political innovations that the 1787 Constitutional Convention developed for the new nation.           TOP:              The Presidency (IV.G)        MSC:              Evaluating

 

  1. The Constitution addressed slavery by:
a. referring numerous times to “slaves” or “slavery”
b. counting slaves as three fifths of a person for the purposes of apportionment
c. requiring that all slaves count toward a state’s congressional representation
d. making it legal in every state
e. requiring that slaves have full legal protections

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 262

OBJ:   Analyze the political innovations that the 1787 Constitutional Convention developed for the new nation.           TOP:              Slavery (IV.J)                                            MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. On the question of women’s rights, the proposed Constitution:
a. denied the vote to females
b. was surprisingly progressive for its time
c. defined women as the property of their husbands
d. accepted the advice of prominent women
e. said nothing

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 263

OBJ:   Analyze the political innovations that the 1787 Constitutional Convention developed for the new nation.           TOP:              The Absence of Women (IV.K)                MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The Constitution was to be considered ratified as soon as it had been approved by:
a. the Constitutional Convention d. nine of the states
b. the Continental Congress e. a majority popular vote
c. all thirteen states

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 266

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              The States Decide (V.C)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The Federalist essays were written by:
a. Madison and Washington d. Hamilton, Madison, and Jay
b. John Jay e. John Adams
c. Patrick Henry

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 265

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              The Federalist (V.B)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Who among the following was an anti-Federalist?
a. Alexander Hamilton d. James Madison
b. John Jay e. George Washington
c. George Mason

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 265

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              Choosing Sides (V.A)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Federalist essay Number 10 explains how a republic can:
a. defend itself
b. become a democracy
c. create a just society
d. pay its debts
e. be successful in a large, diverse society

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 266

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              The Federalist (V.B)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The Federalist argued that:
a. the size and diversity of the large new country would make it impossible for any one faction to control the government
b. the Constitution was necessary to prevent one faction from taking control of the nation
c. a republican form of government could not work in a nation as large as the United States and therefore the Constitution was necessary
d. the Constitution would promote control of the government by one faction, which would be good for the nation
e. if the Constitution failed, the country could always go back to the Articles of Confederation

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 266

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              The Federalist (V.B)

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. The first of these states to ratify the Constitution was:
a. Delaware d. Virginia
b. New York e. Massachusetts
c. Rhode Island

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 266

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              The States Decide (V.C)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. In early 1789, the new Congress gathered in the national capital, which was:
a. Philadelphia d. Washington, D.C.
b. New York City e. Baltimore
c. Boston

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 270

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              The First President (VI.A)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. In his inaugural address, President Washington emphasized:
a. his economic plans d. relations with Britain
b. party politics e. his cabinet selections
c. national unity

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 271

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              The First President (VI.A)   MSC:              Understanding

 

  1. The Bill of Rights did all of the following EXCEPT:
a. safeguard freedoms such as press, speech, and assembly
b. appease some initial critics of the Constitution
c. constitute the first ten amendments to the Constitution
d. protect against “cruel and unusual” punishment
e. settle all questions about federal versus state authority

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 272

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              The Bill of Rights (VI.C)    MSC:              Evaluating

 

  1. In regard to religion, the Constitution:
a. makes the United States a Christian nation
b. reflects the atheism of the Founding Fathers
c. prohibits the states from having official churches
d. expresses hostility toward religion
e. prevents Congress from establishing an official religion

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 273

OBJ:   Explain the nature of the debates surrounding the ratification of the Constitution and how these debates were resolved.                             TOP:              Religious Freedom (VI.D)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Alexander Hamilton’s basic vision of America was to make it:
a. a vibrant capitalist power
b. a democratic model for the world
c. a mighty empire like ancient Rome
d. committed to limited government and social equality
e. an example of racial tolerance and diversity

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 274

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              Hamilton’s Vision of a Capitalist America (VII)

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. One key element of Hamilton’s program to encourage manufacturing was his proposal for:
a. a cutoff of trade with Britain
b. high protective tariffs
c. government-owned factories
d. importation of cheap foreign labor
e. government colleges for industrial education

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 275

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              Hamilton’s Economic Reforms (VII.A)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Madison decided to support Hamilton’s debt proposals in return for an agreement to:
a. give more money to the original bondholders
b. make the states pay their own debts
c. cut taxes
d. limit future federal spending
e. relocate the nation’s capital southward

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 276

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              Sectional Differences (VII.C)                   MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The Bank of the United States:
a. would be totally owned by the federal government
b. had unanimous support in Congress
c. was specifically authorized by the Constitution
d. would provide a stable national currency
e. was ultimately opposed by President Washington

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 277

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              A National Bank (VII.D)    MSC:              Applying

 

  1. In his debate with Jefferson over the national bank’s constitutionality, Hamilton:
a. emphasized states’ rights d. emphasized the Tenth Amendment
b. strictly interpreted the Constitution e. had Madison’s support
c. used the doctrine of implied powers

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 278

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              A National Bank (VII.D)    MSC:              Understanding

 

  1. The emergence of political parties:
a. was anticipated by the writers of the Constitution
b. was strongly encouraged by President Washington
c. resulted from a division between monarchists and republicans
d. brought the United States to the brink of civil war
e. reflected basic philosophical differences between Jefferson and Hamilton

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Pages 280-281

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              Hamilton’s Visionary Achievements (VII.F)

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. When Britain and France went to war in 1793, the United States:
a. supported Britain because of its conservative government
b. supported France because of the Franco-American alliance
c. expressed neutrality, warning Americans not to aid either side
d. allied with other nations to oppose both Britain and France
e. sharply increased its military spending

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 283

OBJ:   Examine how attitudes toward Great Britain and France shaped American politics in the late eighteenth century.           TOP:              Foreign and Domestic Crises (VIII)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Edmond-Charles Genêt:
a. came to the United States to escape the revolutionary excesses of the French Revolution
b. encouraged Americans to attack English and Spanish vessels
c. quickly won the sympathy of Alexander Hamilton and the Federalists
d. was deeply involved in the XYZ affair
e. became a leading member of the Republican party

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 284

OBJ:   Examine how attitudes toward Great Britain and France shaped American politics in the late eighteenth century.           TOP:              Citizen Genêt (VIII.A)        MSC:              Remembering

 

  1. Jay’s Treaty:
a. shut American merchants out of the West Indies
b. ended a war with the British
c. was most strongly opposed in New England
d. infuriated Republicans for its concessions to the British
e. forced Hamilton’s resignation from the cabinet

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 285

OBJ:   Examine how attitudes toward Great Britain and France shaped American politics in the late eighteenth century.           TOP:              Jay’s Treaty (VIII.B)                                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Opposition to Hamilton’s excise tax on whiskey was strongest among:
a. merchants d. frontier farmers
b. Federalists e. churchgoers
c. veterans

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 287

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              The Whiskey Rebellion (VIII.D)               MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Pinckney’s Treaty resulted in:
a. American ownership of the Mississippi River
b. expulsion of the Indians from the Southwest
c. American trade access to Spanish New Orleans
d. Spain’s withdrawal from Florida
e. the right of Americans to settle in Texas

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 289

OBJ:   Examine how attitudes toward Great Britain and France shaped American politics in the late eighteenth century.           TOP:              Pinckney’s Treaty (VIII.E)  MSC:              Understanding

 

  1. Daniel Boone’s route into Kentucky was the:
a. Fincastle Turnpike d. Warriors’ Path
b. Great Valley Road e. Wilderness Road
c. Appalachian Trail

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 291

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              The Wilderness Road (IX.B)                     MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Washington’s farewell address:
a. praised the emerging party system
b. urged greater involvement in Europe
c. was soon forgotten since Washington was a poor speaker
d. was pessimistic about the nation’s future
e. opposed permanent alliances

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 292

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              Washington’s Farewell (X.A)                    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Under President Adams, a war between the United States and France:
a. was an undeclared naval conflict
b. was ended by the XYZ affair
c. halted partisan divisions
d. ended in American victory
e. led to French attacks on the U.S. coast

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 294

OBJ:   Examine how attitudes toward Great Britain and France shaped American politics in the late eighteenth century.           TOP:              The War with France (XI.A)                     MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The Sedition Act was aimed primarily at:
a. foreign immigrants d. French spies
b. anti-war Federalists e. draft-evaders
c. Republican newspaper editors

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 296

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              The War at Home (XI.B)    MSC:              Understanding

 

  1. The Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions argued that:
a. states could nullify federal laws
b. taxes imposed by Congress were unconstitutional
c. immigrants should be expelled from the country if they were not loyal to the American cause
d. the “freedom of speech” clause in the Bill of Rights did not apply to purely political rhetoric
e. new western states should be admitted as quickly as possible

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 296

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              The War at Home (XI.B)    MSC:              Analyzing

 

  1. Jefferson’s election in 1800:
a. continued the Federalist domination of the U.S. government
b. had to be settled by the House of Representatives
c. was assured when Aaron Burr agreed to withdraw as a candidate for president
d. was assured when George Washington announced his support of Jefferson just three weeks before the election
e. ended party divisions

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 297

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              Republican Victory in 1800 (XI.C)           MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The Judiciary Act of 1801:
a. created three new positions on the Supreme Court
b. was the first act passed by the Republicans
c. allowed federal judges to be impeached under the Sedition Act
d. was the legacy of the Federalists as they left office
e. was vetoed by President Jefferson

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 297

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              Republican Victory in 1800 (XI.C)           MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Just before he left office, Adams:
a. repealed Hamilton’s tax policies
b. questioned the fair outcome of the election
c. cemented Federalism within the judiciary
d. destroyed his official records
e. renewed his friendship with Jefferson

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 298

OBJ:   Identify the ways that the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for the United States in the 1790s.           TOP:              Republican Victory in 1800 (XI.C)           MSC:  Understanding

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Describe the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation. Why had the Articles been written that way?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. It is sometimes assumed that because the Articles of Confederation were weak, they were unpopular. Discuss the merits of this statement.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Discuss the background, details, and results of Shays’s Rebellion. In what way did the rebellion impact the debate about the type of governmental structure America should adopt for its future?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Trace the Confederation government’s policies concerning diplomacy. How effective was the government in dealing with outside interests?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Discuss the conflict between Federalists and anti-Federalists in the writing and ratification of the Constitution.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. What major compromises were made at the Constitutional Convention, and what issues did they settle? What issues remained unsettled?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Describe the system of checks and balances in the Constitution.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Examine the importance of the Bill of Rights regarding the establishment of trust and law between the new nation and its citizens.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Assess Alexander Hamilton’s contributions to establishing national economic policy.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Examine George Washington’s motives in declaring that the United States would remain neutral in the conflict between England and France.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Trace the development of political parties during Washington’s administration and describe their basic philosophies.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Examine the Whiskey Rebellion with an eye on the issue of whether or not it was a serious threat to the life of the young nation.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. What was George Washington’s greatest achievement as president? What was his worst failure? Overall, was his administration a success for the nation? Was it a success for the Federalists?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Describe the presidency of John Adams. Be sure to include both the domestic and foreign issues that confronted his administration and how he succeeded in dealing with these issues.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Examine the argument that the Alien and Sedition Acts destroyed John Adams’s presidency.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

MATCHING

 

Match each description with the item below.

a. was the oldest member of the Constitutional Convention
b. issued a neutrality proclamation in 1793 in response to pressure to enter European conflicts
c. drafted the land ordinance of 1784
d. diplomat who sought to undermine American policy relative to the French Revolution
e. briefly represented New York at the Constitutional Convention
f. claimed to “smell a rat” at the Constitutional Convention
g. defined the United States through his tenure as chief justice of the Supreme Court
h. arrived in Philadelphia having spent months preparing for the convention
i. led American troops at the Battle of Fallen Timbers
j. negotiated the extremely popular treaty with Spain

 

 

  1. James Madison

 

  1. Benjamin Franklin

 

  1. Alexander Hamilton

 

  1. Patrick Henry

 

  1. Thomas Jefferson

 

  1. John Marshall

 

  1. Thomas Pinckney

 

  1. Anthony Wayne

 

  1. George Washington

 

  1. Edmond-Charles Genêt

 

  1. ANS:  H

 

  1. ANS:  A

 

  1. ANS:  E

 

  1. ANS:  F

 

  1. ANS:  C

 

  1. ANS:  G

 

  1. ANS:  J

 

  1. ANS:  I

 

  1. ANS:  B

 

  1. ANS:  D

 

CHAPTER 07: THE EARLY REPUBLIC, 1800-1815

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. The “peaceful revolution” refers to the inauguration of Thomas Jefferson.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 304

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Jeffersonian Republicanism (I)

 

  1. Marbury v. Madison was sparked by Jefferson’s attempts to repeal the judgeships initiated by Adams’s “midnight appointments.”

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Pages 308-309

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Marbury v. Madison (I.E)

 

  1. Once in office, Jefferson set out to dismantle Hamilton’s Federalist economic program.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 310

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Jefferson’s Economic Policies (I.F)

 

  1. During Thomas Jefferson’s presidency, the national debt grew much larger.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 310

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Jefferson’s Economic Policies (I.F)

 

  1. Thomas Jefferson signed an act outlawing the foreign slave trade as of 1808.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 311

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Ending the Slave Trade (I.G)

 

  1. From 1763 to 1803, the Louisiana Territory belonged to France.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 312

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              The Louisiana Purchase (I.J)

 

  1. The expansion of the United States into the West weakened the Federalists.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 314

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              The Louisiana Purchase (I.J)

 

  1. President Jefferson thought the Supreme Court needed limiting by new constitutional amendments.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 320

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              The Burr Conspiracy (I.O)

 

  1. James Madison followed Thomas Jefferson as president.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 324

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              James Madison and the Drift to War (II.E)

 

  1. During the early 1800s, the British were more likely than the French to respect American shipping rights.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 325

OBJ:   Examine the primary causes of the American decision to declare war on Great Britain in 1812.

TOP:   The War of 1812 (III)

 

  1. Tecumseh was a Shawnee leader who supported the United States in the War of 1812.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Pages 326-327

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.

TOP:   Native American Conflicts (III.B)

 

  1. William Henry Harrison was the American hero at the Battle of New Orleans.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 327

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.              TOP:              A “Trail of Blood” (III.C)

 

  1. Most “war hawks” were New England Federalists.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 328

OBJ:   Examine the primary causes of the American decision to declare war on Great Britain in 1812.

TOP:   War Hawks (III.E)

 

  1. The Battle of New Orleans was meaningless since it was fought after the war had officially ended.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 340

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.

TOP:   The Battle of New Orleans (IV.B)

 

  1. The Federalist party was badly hurt by its involvement in the Hartford Convention.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 340

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.

TOP:   The Hartford Convention (IV.C)

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Between 1800 and 1840, the nation’s most dramatic population expansion occurred:
a. west of the Appalachians d. in the Deep South
b. in New England e. beyond the Mississippi
c. in Atlantic seaports

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 304

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Jeffersonian Republicanism (I)                 MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Jefferson’s inauguration was notable for:
a. its sharp partisan tone
b. the impassioned delivery of his speech
c. its being the first in Washington, D.C.
d. the luxurious surroundings
e. its immediate call to arms

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 304

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Jeffersonian Republicanism (I)                 MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Thomas Jefferson’s inaugural address reflected:
a. his strong partisan desire to oppose the Federalists now that he was in office
b. his desire to adopt Federalist principles now that he was in office
c. an affirmation of educational elitism and commitment to continued governmental formality
d. a tone of simplicity and conciliation
e. his hopes for a new war to unify the country

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 305

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              The “People’s President” (I.A)                  MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Who said, “We are all Republicans—we are all Federalists”?
a. Alexander Hamilton d. James Madison
b. Thomas Jefferson e. John Adams
c. George Washington

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 306

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              The “People’s President” (I.A)                  MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Which of the following was true of the democracy that emerged at the turn of the century?
a. It was generally supported by Federalists.
b. Common men were no longer content to be governed by an aristocracy.
c. It was the result of an increasingly educated American society.
d. It emerged out of George Washington’s farewell address.
e. It found significant support among the southern slaveholding population.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 306

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              A More Democratic America (I.B)            MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which of the following was NOT true of Jefferson’s contradictory nature?
a. constantly in debt personally while condemning national indebtedness
b. resisted British authority before the Revolution, but advocated for a military alliance as president
c. detested the institution of slavery while retaining approximately 200 of his own
d. drafted the Declaration of Independence while maintaining the institution of slavery
e. while a critic of executive power, he authorized the Louisiana Purchase

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Pages 307-308

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              A Contradictory Genius (I.C)                    MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. President Jefferson’s cabinet:
a. included no one from New England
b. was marked for its mediocrity
c. shared his objective of destroying the Federalists
d. included Madison as secretary of state
e. never actually met

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 308

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Jefferson in Office (I.D)     MSC:              Remembering

 

  1. In the case of Marbury v. Madison, the Supreme Court:
a. showed its commitment to states’ rights
b. ruled that Marbury should occupy his judicial position
c. made itself the government’s most powerful branch
d. proved it was not influenced by politics
e. declared a federal law unconstitutional

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 309

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Marbury v. Madison (I.E)   MSC:              Remembering

 

  1. In the case of Marbury v. Madison, the Supreme Court chief justice who established the principle

of judicial review was:

a. Albert Gallatin d. John Marshall
b. John Jay e. John Quincy Adams
c. John Pickering

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 309

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Marbury v. Madison (I.E)   MSC:              Remembering

 

  1. Jefferson showed his commitment to limited government by:
a. cutting military spending d. abolishing the Postal Service
b. selling the national bank e. canceling the national debt
c. ending the tariff

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 310

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Jefferson’s Economic Policies (I.F)

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Thomas Jefferson believed that a large federal debt would:
a. mean high taxes and public corruption
b. be a national “blessing”
c. help bankers and investors in the United States make money from the federal government
d. be easily paid off in fifty years
e. cause another revolution

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 310

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Jefferson’s Economic Policies (I.F)

MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT true of Jefferson’s ending of the international slave trade?
a. It finally achieved in 1807 what many members of the Constitutional Convention had wanted to do in 1787.
b. Illegal trade in slaves continued well after the deadline.
c. The last day to legally import slaves was January 1, 1808.
d. It was supported by many southerners because they felt African-born slaves were more prone to revolt.
e. At the time of its enacting, most southern states permitted purchasing slaves internationally.

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 311

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Ending the Slave Trade (I.G)                     MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. In the early 1800s, the United States engaged in a naval conflict with:
a. France d. Spain
b. North African pirates e. Canadian smugglers
c. Britain

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 312

OBJ:   Describe the foreign events that impacted the United States during the Jefferson and Madison administrations.           TOP:              The Barbary Pirates (I.H)    MSC:              Remembering

 

  1. To President Jefferson, one major incentive to purchase Louisiana was to:
a. gain the support of the Federalists
b. secure American access to the Mississippi River and New Orleans
c. spend some of the surplus money in the Treasury
d. prove that the United States had become a world power
e. acquire new ports on the Pacific

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 312

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              The Louisiana Purchase (I.J)                     MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The Louisiana Purchase was made possible by:
a. Jefferson’s threat to take the land by force
b. Britain’s support of the U.S. effort
c. Napoléon’s disastrous setback in Haiti
d. the fact that France offered it for free
e. the political backing of the Federalists

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 313

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              The Louisiana Purchase (I.J)                     MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. All of the following are true of the Louisiana Purchase EXCEPT:
a. it was Jefferson’s greatest achievement as president
b. the United States acquired an immensity of new territory
c. it was easily approved by the Senate
d. it was clearly constitutional
e. it soon led to further territorial acquisition

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Pages 313-314

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              The Louisiana Purchase (I.J)                     MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. The Louisiana Purchase was a problem for Jefferson because:
a. the cost was too high for the United States to pay
b. acquisition of new Indian lands was contrary to his principles and beliefs
c. the territory was ideal for slavery, which he opposed
d. he believed that the Constitution did not give authority to acquire new land
e. it would be hard to defend it against the Spaniards

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Pages 313-314

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              The Louisiana Purchase (I.J)                     MSC:  Applying

 

  1. Jefferson sent Lewis and Clark to:
a. make peace with the Indians
b. establish a settlement in Louisiana
c. capture California
d. spread Christianity westward
e. map and explore well beyond the Mississippi

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 315

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Lewis and Clark (I.K)                               MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. Lewis and Clark’s expedition:
a. gave the United States a claim to Oregon
b. was a spectacular failure
c. fought against Spaniards in Texas
d. encountered no friendly Indians
e. concluded that the West was uninhabitable

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 317

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Lewis and Clark (I.K)                               MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. In 1804, Alexander Hamilton was killed in a duel with sitting Vice President:
a. Thomas Jefferson d. John Quincy Adams
b. Thomas Pinckney e. Andrew Jackson
c. Aaron Burr

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 318

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Political Schemes (I.L)        MSC:              Remembering

 

  1. The 1804 presidential election resulted in:
a. a comeback for the Federalists
b. Aaron Burr’s duel with Alexander Hamilton
c. Jefferson’s landslide reelection
d. the rise of a powerful third party
e. months of confusion over the actual winner

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 318

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Jefferson Reelected (I.M)   MSC:              Remembering

 

  1. To avoid the problems associated with political parties running multiple candidates for the presidency, Congress:
a. outlawed multiple party candidates
b. called for a constitutional convention to deal with this issue
c. changed the qualifications for president
d. passed the Twelfth Amendment providing that electors use separate ballots to vote for a president and a vice president
e. made popular vote the method by which presidents would be chosen

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 318

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Jefferson Reelected (I.M)   MSC:              Understanding

 

  1. The Old Republicans, led by John Randolph:
a. were mostly from northern and middle states
b. were staunch nationalists
c. were very closely allied with the Whigs
d. supported Thomas Jefferson
e. supported an agrarian society

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 319

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Divisions in the Republican Party (I.N)

MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Aaron Burr’s conspiracy:
a. involved a plot to assassinate Jefferson
b. brought his conviction for treason
c. involved the Federalists
d. aimed to give him a private western empire
e. caused his removal as vice president

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 320

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              The Burr Conspiracy (I.O)  MSC:              Analyzing

 

  1. Aaron Burr’s treason trial featured:
a. John Marshall’s insistence upon a rigid definition of treason
b. Burr’s dramatic confession
c. Jefferson’s testimony on behalf of the prosecution
d. charges that the jury had been bribed
e. three witnesses of overt acts of treason

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 320

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              The Burr Conspiracy (I.O)  MSC:              Understanding

 

  1. As a result of England’s blockade of the European coastline:
a. American shippers stopped exporting goods to France
b. hundreds of ships’ cargoes were confiscated by the British
c. Americans convinced President Jefferson to strengthen the navy
d. merchant vessels were armed
e. American businessmen paid bribes to the British and French navies

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 321

OBJ:   Describe the foreign events that impacted the United States during the Jefferson and Madison administrations.           TOP:              Naval Harassment (II.A)     MSC:              Remembering

 

  1. Which of the following was NOT true of impressment?
a. It only impacted a few dozen Americans.
b. Speaking English was often enough evidence to have a sailor impressed.
c. The British Navy was the most egregious offender.
d. American merchant ships attracted deserted British sailors.
e. Impressment was technically legal in international courts.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Pages 321-322

OBJ:   Examine the primary causes of the American decision to declare war on Great Britain in 1812.

TOP:   Impressment (II.B)                         MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. The Leopard’s attack upon the Chesapeake:
a. resulted in an American victory
b. occurred on the Great Lakes
c. created war fever in the United States
d. brought an official British apology
e. ended the British practice of impressment

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 322

OBJ:   Examine the primary causes of the American decision to declare war on Great Britain in 1812.

TOP:   The Chesapeake Incident (1807) (II.C)                           MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Jefferson’s Embargo Act:
a. forced a change in British policy
b. was effectively enforced by the navy
c. had widespread public backing
d. sought to stop all American exports
e. ended Jefferson’s presidency on a successful note

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 322

OBJ:   Examine the primary causes of the American decision to declare war on Great Britain in 1812.

TOP:   The Embargo (II.D)                        MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Western settlers and politicians believed war with Britain might enable:
a. a monopoly of the fur trade d. an alliance with Tecumseh
b. expansion to the Pacific e. an alliance with Napoléon
c. the conquest of Canada

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 325

OBJ:   Examine the primary causes of the American decision to declare war on Great Britain in 1812.

TOP:   James Madison and the Drift to War (II.E)                                MSC:   Analyzing

 

  1. The greatest support for the declaration of war in 1812 came from:
a. the New England area
b. the areas in which commerce and international trade were a primary occupation
c. the manufacturing centers
d. the agricultural regions from Pennsylvania southward and westward
e. the Old Republicans

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 326

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.

TOP:   Shipping Rights and National Honor (III.A)                               MSC:   Analyzing

 

  1. President Madison’s attempts to deal with British and French interference with American trade:
a. were far more effective than Jefferson’s
b. showed his belief in peace at any price
c. boosted the domestic economy
d. revealed that Napoléon could be trusted
e. led to war with the British

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 326

OBJ:   Examine the primary causes of the American decision to declare war on Great Britain in 1812.

TOP:   Shipping Rights and National Honor (III.A)                               MSC:   Understanding

 

  1. The Shawnee leader Tecumseh:
a. worked to unite Indians in a vast confederacy
b. was probably the greatest Indian preacher
c. befriended western settlers
d. attacked British Canada
e. won a battle when Americans attacked his capital

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 326

OBJ:   Identify the major domestic political developments that took place during Thomas Jefferson’s administration.           TOP:              Native American Conflicts (III.B)             MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. In the Battle of Tippecanoe:
a. British forces defeated a larger American army
b. American forces defeated a larger British army
c. American frontiersmen battled Spanish settlers in Florida
d. the hope of an Indian confederation to protect their hunting grounds was ended
e. William Henry Harrison was shamefully defeated by the Indians

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 327

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.              TOP:              A “Trail of Blood” (III.C)

MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. The United States felt that with only slight pressure:
a. it could seize Florida from England
b. the French Revolution would reignite with better results
c. Canada would separate from Great Britain
d. France would stop impressing American sailors
e. Indian conflicts would cease

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Pages 327-328

OBJ:   Examine the primary causes of the American decision to declare war on Great Britain in 1812.

TOP:   The Lust for Canada and Florida (III.D)                          MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. Which war hawk loudly proclaimed that his state of Kentucky was ready to march on Canada and acquire its lucrative fur trade?
a. Felix Grundy d. John C. Calhoun
b. Henry Clay e. Andrew Jackson
c. John Randolph

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 328

OBJ:   Examine the primary causes of the American decision to declare war on Great Britain in 1812.

TOP:   War Hawks (III.E)                          MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. As the War of 1812 started, one strength of the United States was:
a. a large standing army
b. a small but war-tested navy
c. a surplus in the federal budget
d. the national bank’s stabilization of the economy
e. President Madison’s genius as commander in chief

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 329

OBJ:   Examine the primary causes of the American decision to declare war on Great Britain in 1812.

TOP:   War Preparations (III.F)                  MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which of the following was NOT true of the American invasion of Canada?
a. It proved to be the most successful American expedition of the War of 1812.
b. The American burning of the city of York drove the English to invade and burn Washington, D.C.
c. Oliver Hazard Perry won a very important naval victory at Put-in-Bay.
d. One American army surrendered without having fired a shot.
e. American naval control of Lake Erie forced the British to abandon Upper Canada.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Pages 330-333

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.              TOP:              Invading Canada (III.I)

MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. The naval battle on Lake Erie resulted in:
a. the death of Tecumseh d. Commodore Perry’s glorious victory
b. American control of Canada e. a British invasion of New York
c. the end of British naval supremacy

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 332

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.              TOP:              Invading Canada (III.I)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. At Horseshoe Bend, Andrew Jackson won a smashing victory over the:
a. Cherokees d. Spaniards
b. Shawnees e. Creeks
c. British

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Pages 333-334

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.              TOP:              The Creek War (III.J)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The British invasion of the mid-Atlantic coast in 1814 resulted in:
a. their capture of Baltimore
b. their defeat by American militia
c. the capture and burning of Washington, D.C.
d. Madison’s resignation as president
e. the U.S. decision to sue for peace

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 336

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.

TOP:   The Burning of Washington (III.L) MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The most notable aspect of the British assault upon Baltimore was:
a. the complete destruction of Fort McHenry
b. the large number of civilian casualties
c. the length of the siege that followed
d. its inspiration for the eventual national anthem
e. the superb performance of the U.S. Navy

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 337

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.

TOP:   The Burning of Washington (III.L) MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The British attack on Baltimore’s Fort McHenry:
a. resulted in the destruction of the British fleet
b. made a national hero of Andrew Jackson
c. increased support for the war in New England
d. did not force the fort’s surrender
e. resulted in an embarrassing American defeat

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 337

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.

TOP:   The Burning of Washington (III.L) MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The Treaty of Ghent:
a. guaranteed American shipping rights
b. gave the British access to the Mississippi River
c. recognized the clear U.S. victory
d. ended the war
e. gave the United States part of Canada

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 338

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.              TOP:              The Treaty of Ghent (IV.A)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. The British defeat at New Orleans is best explained by:
a. their attack upon a strong defensive position
b. Andrew Jackson’s military genius
c. their loss of energy in the southern heat
d. the sharpshooting of the Americans
e. prior awareness that a peace treaty had been signed

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Page 339

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.

TOP:   The Battle of New Orleans (IV.B)  MSC:  Analyzing

 

  1. Which of the following was NOT true of the Battle of New Orleans?
a. It took place shortly before the Treaty of Ghent was signed.
b. Jackson declared martial law over New Orleans in preparation for the battle.
c. British General Pakenham ordered a series of frontal assaults that critically weakened his force.
d. Jackson’s victory made him the biggest celebrity to emerge from the war.
e. Only thirteen Americans died, while there were more than 2,100 British casualties.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   Pages 339-340

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.

TOP:   The Battle of New Orleans (IV.B)  MSC:  Evaluating

 

  1. The Hartford Convention illustrated deep opposition to the war in:
a. the South d. the West
b. New England e. Congress
c. New York

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 340

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.

TOP:   The Hartford Convention (IV.C)    MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. At the Hartford Convention, delegates:
a. voted to secede from the Union
b. proposed a series of constitutional amendments to limit Republican influence in government
c. denounced New England merchants who had traded with the British during the war
d. voted to join the Republican party
e. offered generous peace terms to the British

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   Page 340

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.

TOP:   The Hartford Convention (IV.C)    MSC:  Understanding

 

  1. The War of 1812:
a. made the United States a world power
b. strengthened the Federalists
c. was the deadliest in U.S. history
d. gave the United States its first colonies
e. generated intense patriotic pride

 

 

ANS:  E                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 341

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.              TOP:              The War’s Legacies (IV.D)

MSC:  Remembering

 

  1. As a result of the War of 1812, President Madison:
a. ran for a third term
b. was even more committed to limited government
c. learned the value of some Federalist policies
d. is recognized as a great president
e. switched parties

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   Page 342

OBJ:   Understand the ways in which European affairs complicated the internal political and diplomatic problems of the new United States.              TOP:              The War’s Legacies (IV.D)

MSC:  Understanding

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Assess the degree to which Jefferson’s election as president can accurately be called the “revolution of 1800.”

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. “Strict construction of the Constitution is more a matter of politics than principle.” Discuss this statement in light of the conflicts described in this chapter.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Political dissension seemed to be an important factor in the era of Jefferson. This can be seen in the appearance of, among other things, the Burr conspiracy and the Hartford Convention. How can you account for these examples, and what generalizations can you draw from them?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Discuss the issues that led to the Marbury v. Madison case of 1803. What were the results of the decision, and what impact did it have on the Supreme Court and the country?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Describe President Jefferson’s foreign policy, especially as it related to the Barbary pirates and the French.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Describe the Lewis and Clark expedition. What impact did it have on developing the United States west of the Mississippi River?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Examine Aaron Burr’s western conspiracy.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Led by John Randolph of Roanoke, the Old Republicans became outspoken critics of Jefferson during his second term. Examine their criticisms and their vision for America.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Thomas Jefferson’s decision to enact the embargo is one of the most criticized moments in American history. Did he make the right decision?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Why did the United States go to war with Britain in 1812? Which groups of people supported and opposed the war? Why?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Examine Tecumseh’s attempt to unify western Indians against the Americans. Was his defeat an important moment in Indian-Anglo relations?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Although it was soon forgotten, Americans had a fixation on incorporating Canada into the United States in the early nineteenth century. Examine that idea and discuss the philosophy behind it.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. “The War of 1812 was an unnecessary conflict that solved nothing and brought no benefit to either side.” Discuss the validity of this assertion.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. Explain the Treaty of Ghent and the end of the War of 1812.

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

  1. What were the short-term and long-term results of the War of 1812?

 

ANS:

Answer will vary.

 

MATCHING

 

Match each description with the item below.

a. appointed justice of the peace in the District of Columbia
b. elected president in 1804
c. negotiated the Louisiana Purchase
d. was a naval hero against the Barbary pirates
e. was a war hawk from Kentucky
f. saw the British attack of Fort McHenry from Baltimore Harbor
g. became vice president in 1801
h. was chief justice
i. was an American naval hero in the War of 1812
j. explored the Louisiana Purchase and Far West

 

 

  1. Aaron Burr

 

  1. Henry Clay

 

  1. Stephen Decatur

 

  1. Thomas Jefferson

 

  1. Francis Scott Key

 

  1. Meriwether Lewis

 

  1. Robert R. Livingston

 

  1. William Marbury

 

  1. John Marshall

 

  1. Oliver H. Perry

 

  1. ANS:  G

 

  1. ANS:  E

 

  1. ANS:  D

 

  1. ANS:  B

 

  1. ANS:  F

 

  1. ANS:  J

 

  1. ANS:  C

 

  1. ANS:  A

 

  1. ANS:  H

 

  1. ANS:  I