BCOM 6 6th Edition By Lehman, DuFrene – Test Bank

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BCOM 6 6th Edition By Lehman, DuFrene – Test Bank

Chapter 6—Delivering Good- and Neutral-News Messages

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. Neutral messages contain content that is not likely to generate an emotional message from the receiver.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Memorandums, or memos, are appropriate for communication both inside and outside the company.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Because message expectations and social conventions differ among cultures, effective communicators adapt their strategies when communicating with various audiences.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Making a choice between an inductive outline or a deductive outline is as important in writing an email message or memorandum as in writing a letter.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Selection of the deductive or inductive method of organizing business messages depends on the probable reaction of the receiver to the message.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. An advantage of the deductive organization of good- or neutral-news messages is that it helps receivers save time because they can understand the important idea and then move rapidly through the details.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. The three steps in the deductive strategy used for good- and neutral-news messages indicate the requirement for a three-paragraph document format.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 90              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Good- or neutral-news messages follow a deductive sequence in which the message begins with the main idea.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 89-90         OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Depending on the situation, a thank-you message can be handwritten, printed on letterhead, or sent electronically.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 92              OBJ:   LO: 6-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Goodwill messages can be designed to build strong, lasting relationships among employees, clients, customers, and various other groups.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 92              OBJ:   LO: 6-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Appreciation letters that are not sent in a timely manner may arouse questions about the sender’s motive.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 92              OBJ:   LO: 6-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. It is acceptable to send a message of appreciation that includes strong, somewhat exaggerated language when the sender believes the statements to be true.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 92              OBJ:   LO: 6-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. The strategies for routine claims and persuasive claims differ because with a persuasive claim, a request will likely be granted only after explanations and arguments have been presented.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 94              OBJ:   LO: 6-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. An attempt at resale or sales promotion is inappropriate in a favorable response to a claim message.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 95              OBJ:   LO: 6-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Personalized form letters are a fast and efficient means to send frequently recurring messages that will likely result in a neutral or favorable reaction from the receiver.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 99              OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. The impersonal nature of form letters makes them inappropriate for business purposes.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 99              OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. An acknowledgment message is sent to indicate an order has been received and processed.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 101            OBJ:   LO: 6-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. When asked to provide credit information about an account holder, good advice is to report only facts and avoid opinions about the applicant.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 101            OBJ:   LO: 6-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. The Equal Credit Opportunity Act requires that a credit applicant be notified of a credit decision within 10 days of receipt of the request or application.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 102            OBJ:   LO: 6-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Ethics

STA:   DISC: Codes                                   KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Asking a colleague or employee to walk through the steps outlined in a procedural document is recommended prior to finalizing the document.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 104            OBJ:   LO: 6-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Memos or email messages are the most frequent methods for sharing procedures and instructions for internal business communication when a written record is needed.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 104            OBJ:   LO: 6-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. If you need to convey information that contains good- or neutral-news, you could use
a. letters but not e-mail or voice mail.
b. e-mail but not letters or voice mail.
c. e-mail and letters but not voice mail.
d. e-mail, memos, or voice mail.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. As compared to letters, memos and email are channels for sharing information of a somewhat ____ nature.
a. formal
b. informal
c. negative
d. personal

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. The organization of business messages should be organized based on
a. a prediction of the receiver’s reaction to the main idea.
b. the deductive sequence.
c. the inductive sequence.
d. a reflection of the writer’s mood and personality.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Mary has a neutral message to deliver to a co-worker. What delivery options would be the most effective?
a. Letter, email, or telephone
b. Memo, instant messaging, or letter
c. Letter, phone, or in person
d. Memo, email, or phone

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT an advantage of the deductive sequence approach for a good-news message?
a. The first sentence receives attention since it is in an emphatic position.
b. The good news in the first sentence puts receivers in a good frame of mind.
c. The organization is persuasive and calls for action.
d. The receiver can understand the important idea and move quickly through the supporting details.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. The strategies for structuring effective good- and neutral-news messages
a. follow the inductive sequence.
b. vary dramatically from one company to another.
c. can generally be applied to cultures around the world.
d. are generally consistent among North American audiences.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. Email messages and memos differ from letters in that they are
a. written to employees within a company.
b. less formal in tone and formatting.
c. subject to less grammatical scrutiny.
d. more formal in tone.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 89              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. The steps for the deductive sequence approach for a good-news message are
a. begin with the details, state the main idea, and end on a friendly thought.
b. begin with the main idea, provide details and explanation, and end on a future-oriented closing thought.
c. start with a friendly thought, provide details, and end with the main idea.
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 90              OBJ:   LO: 6-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Which of the following is recommended advice when writing an appreciation message?
a. Time the message to arrive two to three weeks following the action or event.
b. Use slight overstatements to communicate your favorable attitude.
c. Avoid specific remarks about the receiver’s performance or achievement.
d. Consider sending a copy of the appreciation message to the individual’s supervisor.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 92              OBJ:   LO: 6-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Your staff has worked hard to successfully complete a project for a large advertising client. Which of the following is the BEST way for you to express thanks to the staff?
a. Thank them at the staff meeting next month.
b. Post a note on the company intranet.
c. Ask your administrative assistant to post a note in the lunchroom.
d. Send an email immediately to all staff.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 92              OBJ:   LO: 6-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. A sincere apology message to a customer for a serious mistake made would likely be considered by the customer as
a. a negative news message.
b. an attempt to preserve a relationship.
c. unwelcomed, since a verbal apology is more meaningful.
d. a misdirected communication.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 93              OBJ:   LO: 6-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Ignacio is asking for a refund or a replacement for a recently purchased malfunctioning DVD player; his request for the refund or replacement would be considered a
a. persuasive claim.
b. complaint.
c. routine claim.
d. negative news message.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 94              OBJ:   LO: 6-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. Claims related to product warranties, guarantees, or contractual conditions are typically ____ claims.
a. persuasive
b. inductive
c. routine
d. negative news

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 94              OBJ:   LO: 6-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. In writing a routine claim,
a. the message should begin with a request for action.
b. the message should begin with the details and explanation.
c. the message should begin with an expression of appreciation of the business relationship.
d. none of the above.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 90-94         OBJ:   LO: 6-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT good advice for writing a routine claim?
a. Use the direct approach.
b. Use a persuasive, forceful tone.
c. Assume the request will be granted.
d. Avoid an accusatory tone.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 94              OBJ:   LO: 6-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. You are writing to ABClothes.com to request an exchange for an ordered shirt that was recently sent to you in an incorrect size; the message you write will be
a. a routine claim.
b. a persuasive request.
c. a negative news message.
d. a goodwill message.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 94              OBJ:   LO: 6-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

Persuasive requests differ from routine requests in that

a. persuasive arguments need to be presented at the beginning of the message.
b. routine requests require a forceful approach.
c. routine requests begin with details and explanations first.
d. persuasive messages are shorter in length.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 94              OBJ:   LO: 6-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. After consideration of a customer’s request for a partial product refund due to repeated repairs, you have determined that you should comply. Which of the following is NOT part of your effective adjustment message?
a. A fair response to a legitimate request
b. A statement that “the claim is being granted”
c. Resale or sales promotional material
d. An attempt to regain possible lost goodwill

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 95              OBJ:   LO: 6-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. Which of the following requires an individualized acknowledgment message?
a. Initial order from a customer
b. Custom order
c. Delayed order
d. All of the above

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 97              OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Which of the following sentences is a good example of a beginning sentence in a favorable reply to a routine request?
a. We can definitely assist you in having your regional conference at the Ritz-Carlton.
b. Thank you for your request.
c. Please let us know the number of rooms you require first.
d. I read your request.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 100            OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT recommended when preparing form messages?
a. Add variables to the standard text to tailor the message to the individual.
b. Use pre-produced mailing labels.
c. Use stored paragraphs that are selected according to the situation.
d. Use good quality paper and a high quality printer.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 100            OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Ola Jensen has placed her first order with your company. What is the BEST method to let her know you received her order?
a. Send her a preprinted form letter acknowledging the order.
b. Send her a copy of the sales order.
c. Send her sales promotional material.
d. Send her an individualized acknowledgment message about her order.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 101            OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. A well-written message acknowledging a customer’s order usually will likely result in
a. the customer requesting to be removed from the mailing list.
b. the customer placing additional orders.
c. a decrease in the cost of doing business.
d. all of the above

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 101            OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. You have been asked to provide a credit reference for a customer. Which of the following will be part of your written response?
a. your opinions about the customer
b. a statement as to whether the client is a good credit risk
c. a general statement about the client’s credit history, followed by supporting details
d. all of the above

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 101            OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. When you provide credit information about another person, you have an ethical and legal obligation to
a. yourself.
b. the credit applicant.
c. the business from whom credit is requested.
d. all of the above.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 101            OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Ethics

STA:   DISC: Codes                                   KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Which of the following guidelines for writing messages extending credit is FALSE?
a. The writer should include the credit terms.
b. The writer should include the penalty fee for a late payment.
c. The writer should omit any mention of sales promotion or resale.
d. None of the above is false.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 103            OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. Manuel, a credit supervisor, must write a letter informing a new client that her credit application has been approved. What writing sequence should he use?
a. Persuasive since he needs to confirm her choice of his company’s products
b. Inductive because he needs to give her an explanation first
c. Deductive because he needs to give her the good news at the beginning of his message
d. None of the above

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 103            OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. Which of the following are the most frequently used methods of communicating standard operating procedures and other instructions to employees?
a. Memos and email messages
b. Face-to-face meetings and phone conversations
c. Phone conversations and instant messaging
d. Reports and letters

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 104            OBJ:   LO: 6-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. A procedural message may be ineffective if it
a. uses active voice and action verbs.
b. numbers each step of the procedure in order of completion.
c. uses a flow chart to show complex procedures.
d. is not pilot tested by colleagues and other employees.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 104            OBJ:   LO: 6-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Your company has decided to require all employees to wear picture ID badges, starting next week. Numerous steps are involved to get a photo ID. What would you do to alert the employees of the requirement?
a. Send the procedural message in an email to all employees.
b. Ask each employee to come in for a meeting with you.
c. Schedule a company-wide meeting to explain the procedure.
d. Send each employee a form letter to his or her home about the requirement.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 104            OBJ:   LO: 6-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. When writing complex procedures that should be completed in a particular order, which method is BEST?
a. Put the procedures in bullet format.
b. Number the steps.
c. Prepare a flowchart.
d. None of the above.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 104            OBJ:   LO: 6-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Rhetorical Considerations    KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. You have just received your cell phone bill, and realized that you have been charged this month and for several previous months for a calling feature you did not authorize. You called the cell phone provider but were told that only the charge for this month can be credited. You are planning to write a letter to get your bill adjusted. What tone should your letter have? Why?

 

ANS:

Since your assumption is that the cell phone company wants to be fair to customers, your tone should be positive and factual. Using a forceful, accusatory tone will only worsen the situation and cause a defensive response to your request.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Challenging                   REF:   p. 94

OBJ:   LO: 6-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication           STA:   DISC: Audience

KEY:  Bloom’s: Analysis

 

  1. List the steps in the deductive outline used for good- and routine-news messages. Explain why the deductive outline is recommended for these messages.

 

ANS:

The steps in the outline are

1. state the pleasant or main idea
2. provide details or explanation
3. remind the receiver of the good news or main idea or include a future-oriented closing thought.

The deductive outline is recommended for good- and routine-news messages because the receiver is expected to find the message pleasing or acceptable, which will result in a favorable response or action.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Challenging                   REF:   p. 103

OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication           STA:   DISC: Patterns

KEY:  Bloom’s: Synthesis

 

CASE

 

  1. Customer Requests Information for Returning Product

 

The customer service department of Software Solutions received a letter from Latif Ahmed stating that he placed an order for the AccTabs accounting software and instead received a software package entitled ThirdWave. He would like to receive a UPS account number to use when returning the product so that he will not have to pay the shipping, as well as instructions for packaging and labeling the returned product.

 

Required:

 

Write an e-mail message as the customer service manager of Software Solutions responding to Mr. Ahmed’s requests. Include an appropriate subject line and message body in your solution.

 

ANS:

The subject line should be descriptive of the situation (example: UPS Instructions for Returned Merchandise).

 

The body of the message should be written deductively, beginning with the statement that the company is glad to assist with the UPS return of the unordered merchandise. A bulleted list of instructions should follow, including the account information needed for the return. Action verbs should be used.

 

A positive statement about a new software title that is about to be released or other related products should be included.

 

The message should end with a positive, forward-looking idea.

 

A complimentary close such as sincerely or thank-you should be followed by your name and signature file information.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Challenging                   REF:   p. 95-96

OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Reflective Thinking     STA:   DISC: Receiver Reaction

KEY:  Bloom’s: Synthesis

 

  1. Crafting an Effective Claim Request

 

Analyze the following routine claim letter and make needed revisions.

 

Dear Mr. Ortiz:

 

Eight months ago, I purchased the Wireless-G Broadband Router (2.4 GHz), Model No. WRT54G, from your company. After only eight months of use, it no longer works. It quit working while I was in the middle of a huge project, and the delay cost me hundreds of dollars.

 

Since this product came with a year warranty, I am upset that it quit working after less than a year. It must be defective. I have the receipt for purchase and want a replacement immediately. The router problem has already cost me time and money. If I don’t receive a replacement or refund immediately, I will not buy your products in the future.

 

Please send a replacement router via express delivery to the address on this letterhead.

 

Thank you.

 

ANS:

Revise the letter using a positive tone that assumes the router will be replaced since it is still under warranty.

 

Place the request for replacement in the first sentence. Provide an explanation of the problem with the router. Explain that it is still under warranty.

 

Avoid using a writer-centered, demanding tone. Assume that the request will receive appropriate action.

 

End on a positive note, thanking the reader for quickly shipping the replacement.

 

A proposed solution follows:

 

Dear Mr. Ortiz:

 

Please send me a replacement for the Wireless-G Broadband Router (2.4 GHz) Model No. WRT54G that I purchased eight months ago. The product, which came with a one-year warranty, apparently is defective.

 

A copy of my receipt in enclosed. Please ship the replacement router this week to the address listed at the top of this letterhead. I would appreciate express delivery. I am currently facing several work-related deadlines and need a router as soon as possible to complete my projects.

 

Because your company is ranked high for quality products and excellent customer service, I anticipate that my request will be processed as quickly as possible. I’m hoping to use the new router next week, if not sooner.

 

Sincerely,

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Challenging                   REF:   p. 97-100

OBJ:   LO: 6-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Reflective Thinking     STA:   DISC: Receiver Reaction

KEY:  Bloom’s: Analysis

 

  1. Extension of Credit to InfoSearch

 

You have received a request for credit from a company called InfoSearch for online databases available from your company. You are a vendor for information databases, and subscribers to your services may contract for 12-month access to this information. You offer various service packages that provide access to specific databases. InfoSearch wants the Standard Package which allows access to a selection of your company’s available databases. The extension of credit will allow InfoSearch to order additional levels of service as needed and pay for them on a monthly basis.

 

Required:

 

Send a letter, stating that credit is granted, to Olena Androgenski at InfoSearch.

 

ANS:

The body of the message should be written deductively, beginning with the extension of credit and the reason for the credit approval.

 

Introduce the credit terms for the annual subscription to the Premier Package. Present resale to remind InfoSearch of the wealth of information available through your online databases. Include a positive statement of a new database that will soon be available to subscribers to the Premier Package.

 

End the letter with a positive, forward-looking idea of an on-going business relationship.

 

A proposed solution follows:

 

Dear Ms. Androgenski:

 

We’re pleased to welcome you as a new subscriber to our Standard Package, one of the best bargains in functional collections of research databases available today. Our databases offer current information from thousands of quality sources that cover every topic imaginable. In fact, we’re ranked among the top database vendors for comprehensive information and quality service.

 

The subscription to the Standard Package will be effective immediately to your company. Because of the excellent credit rating for InfoSearch, we’ll start your service today, with monthly billing sent electronically at the start of next month. Simply submit payment within ten days after billing to avoid late fees. You may add additional services as needed. Should you choose to cancel your annual subscription, please notify us within 30 days of the expiration date. We will continue your subscription next year unless notified. It’s as simple as that! No hassle with annual renewals. You’ll get uninterrupted service from an excellent provider.

 

Next month, we’ll be adding two new databases to our Standard Package. As a new subscriber, you can automatically take advantage of these. You’ll always get the best information available because we make it our daily job to stay on top of current electronic sources. You’ll benefit by this as we regularly add new databases to our Standard Package services.

 

Our customer service representatives are available 24/7 to answer your questions. After all, providing and accessing information is our number one goal. We’re here when customers need us. Enjoy your new subscription today, and call if you need us.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Challenging                   REF:   p. 101-103

OBJ:   LO: 6-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Reflective Thinking     STA:   DISC: Receiver Reaction

KEY:  Bloom’s: Application | Bloom’s: Synthesis

 

Chapter 7—Delivering Bad-News Messages

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. In some circumstances, sharing bad news via email rather than face-to-face is justified.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 109            OBJ:   LO: 7-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. By placing bad news in the first paragraph, receiver support is more likely than when it is presented after giving reasons.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 109            OBJ:   LO: 7-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Since the main message of a negative-news message is the bad news, more space should be devoted to the refusal than to the explanations for the refusal.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 110            OBJ:   LO: 7-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. In some circumstances, placing a refusal in the first sentence is justified.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 110            OBJ:   LO: 7-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. “I have received and read your letter of April 12” is an effective neutral way to begin the first paragraph of a bad-news message.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 111            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. The best reason to give the receiver for a refusal is “company policy” because it requires no further explanation.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 113            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Usually, a statement of bad news should be followed by a logical explanation.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 113            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Offering a counterproposal may eliminate the need to state the refusal directly.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 114            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Providing an alternative or counterproposal to a refusal for a request should be avoided since it would only heighten audience frustration over the bad news.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 114            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. “We apologize for any inconvenience we may have caused you” is a recommended way to close a refusal letter.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 115            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Using passive voice and complex sentences are effective ways to de-emphasize bad news.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 115            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Rhetorical Considerations    KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. To minimize disappointment and maintain a positive relationship, the inductive strategy is the best way to organize messages that refuse requests.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 115            OBJ:   LO: 7-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Because of the legal implications involved in refusing credit, you should avoid telling applicants the specific reason(s) why you must deny them credit.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 120            OBJ:   LO: 7-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Ethics

STA:   DISC: Codes                                   KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. In a credit refusal message, your main purpose is to tactfully say “no” since the recipient is a poor credit risk and not a potential customer.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 120            OBJ:   LO: 7-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. The Fair Credit Reporting Act gives consumers specific rights and protections when they apply for and are denied credit.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 122            OBJ:   LO: 7-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Ethics

STA:   DISC: Codes                                   KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Communicating constructive criticism about service received can be thought of as an ethical responsibility.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 122            OBJ:   LO: 7-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Ethics

STA:   DISC: Codes                                   KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Delivering constructive criticism can be beneficial by alerting management that changes need to be made.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 122            OBJ:   LO: 7-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. When communicating negative organizational news, it is advisable to tone down the news to minimize its severity.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 123            OBJ:   LO: 7-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Email is typically the most effective channel for communicating negative organizational news.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 123            OBJ:   LO: 7-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Which of the following is FALSE concerning personal delivery of bad news?
a. Personal delivery of the bad news signals the importance of the news.
b. Personal delivery eliminates any potential escalation of emotion.
c. Personal delivery shows empathy for the recipient.
d. Personal delivery provides the benefits of nonverbal cues.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 109            OBJ:   LO: 7-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. If bad news appears in the first sentence of a message, the
a. receiver will be prepared for the reasoning that follows.
b. receiver’s urge to counter argue will be minimized.
c. receiver’s reaction is likely to be defensive.
d. receiver will withhold judgment until he or she has finished reading.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 109            OBJ:   LO: 7-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. What is the correct order for the inductive writing sequence?
a. Buffer, reasons, bad news, counterproposal, and desire to continue the relationship
b. Reasons, neutral idea, bad news, and desire to continue the relationship
c. Bad news, reasons, counterproposal, and desire to continue the relationship
d. Buffer, bad news, reasons, counterproposal, and desire to continue the relationship

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 110            OBJ:   LO: 7-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Exceptions to the use of inductive approach for bad-news messages include
a. messages addressing a very small, insignificant matter.
b. memos sent within the company.
c. oral presentations.
d. all of the above

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 111            OBJ:   LO: 7-1          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. An effective opening for a bad-news message
a. notes the date of the message being answered.
b. expresses gratitude for the time the receiver took to write.
c. provides an immediate answer to the receiver’s request.
d. makes a neutral comment related to the main idea.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 112            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Which of the following are FALSE when writing bad-news messages?
a. The writer should focus on the good rather than the bad.
b. The writer should present the negative ideas in positive terms when possible.
c. The writer should state what can be done rather than what cannot be done.
d. The writer should state the bad news early and reinforce it throughout the message.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 113            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT a technique for writing a bad-news message?
a. Use positive language to accentuate the positive.
b. Use the deductive writing approach.
c. Sandwich the bad news between the buffer and positive closing.
d. Use passive voice, general terms, and abstract nouns.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 113            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Greg Komuro often delivers messages to clients in which he must convey negative ideas. Which of the following techniques could Greg use to subordinate bad news?
a. Passive voice and abstract nouns as the subjects of sentences
b. Passive voice and the placement of the negative message in an independent clause
c. Active voice and positive language
d. Active voice and placement of the negative message in the dependent clause

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 114            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Rhetorical Considerations    KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Your employer asked you to compose a message to be sent to all job applicants who were not selected for a sales representative position. You should
a. tell the applicant at the beginning that another candidate was chosen.
b. ask the applicant to consider why he or she was not selected.
c. place the “not selected” message in the dependent clause of a complex sentence describing the stiff competition for this job.
d. imply that someone else has been selected for the position, thus avoiding the uncomfortable job of rejecting someone.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 114            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. A counterproposal
a. is unnecessary if you have stated your refusal tactfully.
b. weakens your refusal by implying that you are not able to enforce your decision.
c. is an alternative to the action requested that helps preserve your future relationship with the receiver.
d. should precede the refusal.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 114            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. An effective counterproposal
a. can eliminate the need to state the refusal directly.
b. may represent a tangible benefit to the reader.
c. may not always be possible.
d. All of the above.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 114            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Which of the following is the BEST negative reply to a request for a favor?
a. Thank you for asking me to speak at your meeting, but I will not be able to attend.
b. Because I have a previous engagement in Phoenix, I cannot demonstrate my machine at your conference.
c. Although I have multiple obligations for the date you suggested, I fully support your effort to raise funds for the homeless.
d. I find my schedule is as impossible as ever; I must be doing something wrong with my priorities.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 114            OBJ:   LO: 7-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT recommended within the final sentence of a bad-news message?
a. Tactful restatement of the refusal
b. Sales promotional material
c. Some future aspect of the business relationship
d. An expression of willingness to assist in some other way

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 115            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Which sentence is a good example of a buffer for a bad news message?
a. Your letter dated April 14 has been referred to me for reply.
b. I can understand how you felt when you had to pay $168.
c. Your credit application was reviewed by two loan officers.
d. Your claim has been denied, but let us explain why.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 115            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. Which of the following would be the BEST closing sentence in a bad-news message?
a. We understand your disappointment in this decision.
b. Please do not hesitate to contact us again if you have any further questions.
c. To see the video that discusses our two newest investment offers, just phone us at 555-1616 to request your copy.
d. We trust you will continue to rely on Carson products in spite of this present difficult situation.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 115            OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. Which of the following is the BEST suggestion to follow when refusing a request?
a. Use the inductive approach.
b. Provide a vague reason to minimize the receiver’s disappointment.
c. Use the direct approach.
d. Follow the bad news with adequate reasons.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 115            OBJ:   LO: 7-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Jawon is a training and development manager who has been asked by a professor to speak to her class about careers in training. However, since he is currently conducting an important staff development program, his schedule is very busy, and he must refuse the request. What would be the BEST way to end his message?
a. Again, I am very flattered by your request.
b. I apologize that I am so busy right now. Maybe next semester I can speak to your class.
c. I’ll call you if I have some time in the next month.
d. My training assistant, David, has extensive experience and would enjoy speaking to your class. Please feel free to call him at 469-8000.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 117            OBJ:   LO: 7-3          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. Delnisha, a customer service representative for the manufacturer of Marathon brand faucets, receives a large order from a small contractor. Which of the following is the BEST way for Delnisha to begin a message saying the company does not sell directly to end users?
a. This letter informs you that we unfortunately do not sell faucets directly to contractors.
b. I have referred your order to a distributor near you.
c. Thank you very much for your order. Unfortunately, we will not be able to fill it.
d. Our patenting coating process makes Marathon faucets the contractor’s choice.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 118-119     OBJ:   LO: 7-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. Melody is responding negatively to a request for a claim. Which of the following would she NOT do in composing her message to the customer?
a. Begin the message with a neutral, dependent clause, followed by a statement implying the refusal.
b. Include sales promotional and resale material in the last paragraph.
c. Offer an alternative service as a gesture of goodwill.
d. Present the reasoning behind her decision without using emotional wording.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 120            OBJ:   LO: 7-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. You must deny a request for credit to an applicant who does not meet your company’s requirements. Using a sentence such as “You are encouraged to make cash purchases” illustrates a
a. counterproposal.
b. bait and switch technique.
c. confirmation of priorities.
d. consideration of eligibility.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 114-120     OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. Messages denying credit are different from other types of bad-news messages in that they
a. are subject to more legal issues.
b. do not need to maintain the goodwill of the recipient.
c. do not have to include reasons for refusal.
d. use the deductive pattern of organization.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 122            OBJ:   LO: 7-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Ethics

STA:   DISC: Codes                                   KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. To avoid litigation, some credit-granting companies
a. choose not to respond to customer requests for credit.
b. choose to omit from their letters the explanation for credit denial.
c. make the name and address of the credit bureau inaccessible to the consumer.
d. refuse credit by phone rather than in writing.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 122            OBJ:   LO: 7-4          NAT:  BUSPROG: Ethics

STA:   DISC: Codes                                   KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. When writing a message offering constructive criticism, one’s primary consideration should be
a. identifying who made the error.
b. offering input that could benefit many.
c. getting even for the mistake that was made.
d. none of the above.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 122            OBJ:   LO: 7-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Your department hired a strategic planning consultant to restructure the workforce. However, you believe that the consultant added no value to the company and simply played back what you wanted to hear. You must write a letter to the president of the consulting company to discuss your dissatisfaction. Which of the following is the BEST approach to your letter?
a. Start with some facts about what the consultant was supposed to do. Enumerate what was done incorrectly. End with a pleasant message expressing your appreciation.
b. Start with a statement about your dissatisfaction with the consultant. Continue with a list of things that the consultant did incorrectly. End with a direct statement about how worthless the consultant was.
c. Start with some good things that the consultant did. Accentuate the positive and avoid as much negative information as possible. End pleasantly, saying that you hope you can do business again in the future.
d. Start with some facts about what the consultant was supposed to do. Mention what the consultant did well, but also be clear about what the consultant did not do well. End with a pleasant message expressing the hope that the information you provided will assist the consulting company.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 122            OBJ:   LO: 7-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Patterns                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Although communicating negative organizational news can be challenging, such messages can have a positive effect in
a. showing management’s display of respect for employees.
b. providing an opportunity for management to build unity and trust.
c. allowing employees to pose questions to management.
d. All of the above.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 122            OBJ:   LO: 7-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT an effective strategy for companies that want to provide strong internal communication?
a. Promote open exchange of honest, candid communication.
b. Use a variety of communication channels to encourage two-way communication.
c. Limit the questions employees may ask management.
d. Keep employees informed of both good and bad news.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy

REF:   p. 123            OBJ:   LO: 7-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Purpose                                KEY:  Bloom’s: Comprehension

 

  1. Which of the following is FALSE concerning the communication of negative news within an organization?
a. Employee morale, like customer goodwill, is fragile and easily damaged.
b. Sensitive handling of bad news related to the organization can help build unity and trust.
c. Delivering bad news as soon as possible minimizes damage resulting from rumors and shows respect for employees.
d. The most effective approach is to use one strong communication method for communicating with employees.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 125            OBJ:   LO: 7-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. A company plans to downsize over the next year. Which of the following would be the BEST way to prepare employees for this negative announcement?
a. Send an email to employees the first day that employees are scheduled for layoff.
b. Send a letter to laid off employees at their home address instructing them not to report for work to avoid emotional confrontations.
c. Use the company’s internal communications (newsletters and intranet) to make employees aware of the downsizing before it happens.
d. Call a staff meeting at the end of the day on the Friday before layoffs begin to make the negative announcement.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate

REF:   p. 125            OBJ:   LO: 7-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

List and explain three stylistic aspects of writing a bad-news statement.

 

ANS:

· Emphasize the positive and de-emphasize the negative. Use the inductive approach for bad news messages; subordinate the negative aspect of the message and emphasize the positive aspect.
· Use positive language to accentuate the positive and de-emphasize the negative. Carefully select words that do not offend or blame to make the tone of the message more positive.
· Imply the refusal when the receiver can understand the message without a definite statement of the bad news. Rather than stating a blunt refusal, use words that imply the refusal as long as the message of the refusal remains clear to the recipient.

 

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Easy                              REF:   p. 114

OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Rhetorical Considerations    KEY:  Bloom’s: Knowledge

 

  1. Explain how a counterproposal may be used to preserve a positive relationship when denying a request or when delivering bad news.

 

ANS:

By proposing an alternative to the action requested, the communicator denies the request while ensuring that the relationship will not suffer as a result. The counterproposal is an expression of goodwill, a willingness to help the receiver. In a letter denying credit, for instance, a counterproposal can let the customer know that you still value his or her business and that, as soon as credit history is established or improved, the customer may reapply for credit.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Challenging                   REF:   p. 114

OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication           STA:   DISC: Audience

KEY:  Bloom’s: Synthesis

 

  1. Discuss the implications behind the statement that “the customer is always right” in light of the fact that a company must at times deny a customer’s request.

 

ANS:

The “customer is always right” philosophy has been readily accepted since a company wants to satisfy its customers and clients. Companies are in business because of consumers and clients continuing to buy their products and services. But a company would not be in business long if it continued to honor claims in which the customer is clearly wrong. The customer has a right to make a claim, but it is the company representative who has to decide the basis of the claim and to make a fair decision.

 

Additionally, a company has to share negative organizational news from time to time, but keeping employees informed about the company performance is another way to assure the workers that the company is doing the right thing in preparing them first for any major change in its operations or staff reduction. Doing this shows sensitivity and care for the employees and provides an opportunity to build employee trust and loyalty.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Challenging                   REF:   p. 115-116

OBJ:   LO: 7-3 | LO: 7-4                            NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication

STA:   DISC: Audience                             KEY:  Bloom’s: Analysis

 

  1. You recently hired a catering service for an important awards ceremony for the members of your organization. Some of the menu choices were poorly prepared and the service was slow. You were dissatisfied with the service and would like to send a message to the owner of the catering business. How would this owner benefit from your constructive criticism? What tone should the message have?

 

ANS:

The owner of the catering business can benefit from your constructive criticism and correct the problems to avoid losing future business. The owner can try to determine the reason for the poor food quality and make changes to the menu and preparation of food. Problems with the actual service can be improved with additional training or hiring new, better qualified employees. Rather than loose future business, the owner can benefit from your comments and improve the quality and reputation of the catering company.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate                                 REF:    p. 122

OBJ:   LO: 7-5          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication           STA:   DISC: Audience

KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

  1. You have just completed a week-long stay at a hotel/resort that hosted your company’s national sales meeting. You were dissatisfied overall with the hotel’s service and would like to send a message to the management of the hotel. How would the hotel benefit from your constructive criticism? What tone should the message have?

 

ANS:

Any company dealing directly with customers should value constructive criticism from customers; most customers would avoid utilizing the service again without providing a reason. The hotel can benefit from your constructive criticism by pinpointing problem areas and seeking to resolve these problems. If other customers have pointed out the same problems, then they merit the hotel’s time and effort to resolve. The message should have a factual tone meant to help the hotel, not to simply complain.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Moderate                                 REF:    p. 122

OBJ:   LO: 7-6          NAT:  BUSPROG: Communication           STA:   DISC: Audience

KEY:  Bloom’s: Application

 

CASE

 

  1. Conference Hotel Changes

 

You manage a large hotel that is used by organizations and businesses for meetings and conferences. A recent storm has damaged part of your hotel which means that you have fewer rooms available for meetings. You now have nearly 20 percent fewer guest rooms for conference participants and four less meeting rooms for smaller sessions. You estimate that room repairs will take nearly a month, but the Association of Intercultural Studies is scheduled to arrive for a three-day conference in two weeks and has booked all rooms. Now there are not enough rooms for the conference.

 

Required:

 

As manager of the hotel, write a letter to the meeting manager for the association. Tell the manager the bad news regarding the damage to the rooms and provide an alternative of using rooms at a nearby hotel.

 

ANS:

Conference Hotel SOLUTION

 

Write the letter inductively, beginning with a buffer that leads to the reasons for the bad news.

1. Use a buffer paragraph to introduce the idea that you are looking forward to the arrival of conference attendees in two weeks. Remind the meeting manager that your hotel has an excellent reputation for quality service and an experienced staff to handle large conferences.
2. Present the facts about the recent storm and how it affected the local area.
3. Present the bad news of the damage to the hotel, but emphasize the large number of rooms still available for the meeting. Reassure the meeting manager that your staff is prepared to handle changes and that you have already made alternative arrangements.
4. Explain that a nearby hotel will accommodate the overflow of guests and meetings. Your hotel will provide a free shuttle and reduced room rates for all attendees.
5. Close with a positive idea that the conference will be a success and that attendees will enjoy their stay at your reputable hotel.

 

A proposed solution follows:

 

Dear Ms. Chastain:

 

It has been over a year since you contracted with our hotel for the annual conference of the Association of Intercultural Studies. In two weeks, your conference participants will arrive and have the opportunity to enjoy our wonderful cuisine, pool and spa, and luxurious accommodations. You’ve made a great choice in hotels. As you know, we’re one of the most highly rated hotels in the city for providing conference facilities.

 

We’re particularly known for working closely with meeting and event planners to ensure that everything runs smoothly for conferences. Our staff is highly skilled, creative, and can quickly adapt to the frequent changes that come with managing conferences. You now have the best hotel staff in the city ready to make your three-day conference one of the best ever.

 

You may have heard about the recent storm that hit our city this week. We, like many other businesses, suffered some damage to rooms, but thanks to our neighboring Hilton Hotel, we can make the necessary changes smoothly. Some changes will affect your conference, but the shuttle service will be available regularly to transport your participants between the Hilton and our hotel. We’ve had to reschedule four of the meetings rooms conference in the Hilton Hotel. The shuttle will run continually during the time of these sessions. The storm caused damage to some rooms, so 20 percent of the participants will be provided rooms in the equally luxurious Hilton Hotel. Our discount rate will apply to these rooms.

 

We assure you that we’re equipped and ready to provide all the services you may need. Call if you have any questions about these changes. We’re eagerly awaiting the arrival of the guests from the Association of Intercultural Studies. I think they will love our hotel and enjoy the extra accommodations of the Hilton which will be available to everyone.

 

Sincerely,

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Challenging                   REF:   p. 111-115

OBJ:   LO: 7-2          NAT:  BUSPROG: Reflective Thinking     STA:   DISC: Receiver Reaction

KEY:  Bloom’s: Synthesis

 

  1. Improving on Constructive Criticism

 

A new medical assistant, Janelle, was hired at an outpatient medical center. Her supervisor found an error she made on a patient’s record and sent Janelle the following email. Edit the email so that it is a good example of constructive criticism.

 

“I just want you to know how angry I am to find an error you made on Mr. Smith’s record yesterday. How careless can you be about such an important thing? There is absolutely no room for carelessness in this job because people’s lives depend on us! I’ve fixed the error, but if this ever happens again, you may lose your job.”

 

ANS:

1. Start the message with a buffer that factually explains the importance of accuracy in medical records.
2. Provide an example of how a seemingly minor detail can have major ramifications for patients.
3. Point out the error made by Janelle and explain how it should have been recorded.
4. Offer to help answer questions or to double-check her work while she is in training. Provide suggestions that will help her to avoid future errors with patient records.
5. Encourage her to excellence.

 

A proposed solutions follows:

 

TO: Janelle
SUBJECT: Patient Record Accuracy

 

Accuracy in patient records is a top priority for all of us at Medical Center. Among the myriad of details that we must enter daily on patient records, an error can sometimes occur. When discovered, we try to correct these as quickly as possible to avoid serious problems in treating our patients.

 

I’m sure that you realize the serious nature of incorrectly recording information on patient charts. The consequence of one error can have far reaching ramifications, including life-threatening patient issues and medical malpractice. With this in mind, it is critically important that you check and double-check all of the information that you enter in patient records.

 

The recent error you made on Mr. Smith’s record was thankfully not life threatening, but this serves as an important reminder to you that all information must be checked before entering. This is an essential part of your job, and there is no room for error. Some of our more experienced medical assistants would be glad to provide tips for double-checking patient information prior to recording. I’ve scheduled a brief training session tomorrow at 8 a.m. with Jeremy Combs who will review this matter with you.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Challenging                   REF:   p. 122-123

OBJ:   LO: 7-6          NAT:  BUSPROG: Reflective Thinking     STA:   DISC: Receiver Reaction

KEY:  Bloom’s: Analysis

 

  1. Company Downsizing

 

You are the president of Technik Inc. Global competition and reduced market share has sent profits on a downward spiral which will result in employee layoffs. Nearly 10 percent of the employees will be laid off, effective in one week. They will receive two weeks severance pay, accrued sick leave pay, and career consulting from the human resources department. Write an interoffice memorandum announcing this negative organization news.

 

ANS:

Company Downsizing SOLUTION

 

Write the interoffice memorandum inductively, beginning with a short neutral paragraph.

1. Note how important good employees are to any business. Thank the employees for their hard work and interest in the company’s success. Comment on their positive contributions to their jobs and remind them of the talent and skill they bring to the workplace.
2. Describe the recent problems of global competition in the industry and how it has negatively impacted Technik Inc. State the facts and reasons for the problem.
3. Present the bad news by de-emphasizing it in a dependent clause of a complex sentence. Show empathy to the employees’ feelings.
4. Provide information on the severance benefits and career counseling. Offer to write a letter of reference that can be used for a job search.
5. End with a positive idea that affirms the employee’s hireability in the workplace.

 

A proposed solution follows:

 

TO: All Technik Employees
SUBJECT: Changes at Technik

 

During our ten years in business, we’ve experienced many years of successful sales, thanks to our hard-working employees. Many of you have been with us this entire time and have contributed your skills and extensive knowledge to making this company a success. Many of our newcomers have brought innovative ideas, cutting edge knowledge, and admirable team efforts to our company. All of you have worked hard together, often sacrificing by working long hours to complete deadlines.

 

We’ve produced great products that we can be proud of. This would not have happened without such a great group of employees. You are well aware that in the past year increased global competition has drastically reduced our market share. We have kept you posted each quarter and made our best efforts to communicate honestly and openly with you. In light of these quarterly postings, a few employees understandably have sought jobs elsewhere. Most of you have demonstrated an ongoing commitment and optimism that profits would increase each quarter. We’ve tried to cut costs as much as possible to avoid laying off Technik employees. Unfortunately, these cutbacks in expenses are no longer enough. We’re now faced with the reality of downsizing in order to survive as a company. As president, it is not an easy choice to decide who stays and who goes. In fact, it is one of the toughest decisions that I have had to make during my 10 years in this position. I value all of you and the impressive contributions you’ve made to this company.

 

The details of this downsizing will be given to those who are laid off, but the bottom line is that Technik must reduce the number of employees by 10 percent, effective next week. Today, affected employees will receive notices of layoff. In an effort to provide some financial cushion, they will also receive a severance package that includes two weeks severance pay plus any accrued sick leave pay. Career consulting will be available from the human resources department, and supervisors will write letters of recommendations for those who need them.

 

We hope we have turned the corner toward financial stability. Again, thank you for your dedication to your work and this company.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Difficulty: Challenging                   REF:   p. 123-125

OBJ:   LO: 7-7          NAT:  BUSPROG: Reflective Thinking     STA:   DISC: Receiver Reaction

KEY:  Bloom’s: Synthesis