Human Intimacy Marriage The Family And its Meaning 11TH EDITION By COX – Test Bank

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Human Intimacy Marriage The Family And its Meaning 11TH EDITION By COX – Test Bank

CHAPTER 6—DATING, SINGLE LIFE, AND MATE SELECTION

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Most American dating practices developed:
a. during the colonial period.
b. in the late 1800s.
c. after World War I.
d. in the 1960s.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Introduction   OBJ:   1

 

  1. In light of the textbook material on the emergence of American dating, it would be reasonable to conclude:
a. the process is still controlled by parents.
b. mate selection was initially an informal process.
c. dating is a fairly recent development.
d. lifestyle changes have made dating less complex.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Introduction   OBJ:   1

 

  1. The United States has a large group of older people dating. What is a major contributing factor in this phenomenon?
a. recreational sex
b. high divorce rates
c. changing media images
d. economic prosperity

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Introduction   OBJ:   1

 

  1. American dating has been shaped by all of the following factors EXCEPT:
a. the emancipation of women.
b. arranged marriage systems.
c. mass production of automobiles.
d. rural to urban migration.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. Perhaps the characteristic of mate selection in America that most distinguishes it from the rest of the world is that it is:
a. based on sex and reproduction.
b. supported by religious sentiments.
c. a highly competitive process.
d. run by participants themselves.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. With open-choice mate selection, the ensuing marriages are totally subservient to:
a. individual needs and desires.
b. unwanted family influences.
c. changing sexual mores.
d. premarital gender roles.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. The most important element in the open-choice mate selection process is:
a. parental influence.
b. family background.
c. individual attraction.
d. community approval.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. The stability of a relationship is accurately predicted by:
a. the couple.
b. parents.
c. children.
d. Tarot cards.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. Dating offers all of the following benefits EXCEPT:
a. social status.
b. self-knowledge.
c. ego-fulfillment.
d. meretricious rewards.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. The classic example of how dating can change one’s status is the young man who dates and then marries:
a. a childhood sweetheart.
b. the boss’ daughter.
c. an older woman.
d. the girl next door.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. Cox and Demmitt link the limited opportunity to learn about the opposite sex to:
a. small nuclear families.
b. changing American lifestyles.
c. commitment oriented values.
d. telephone dating services.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. John dates Amanda because she understands him and makes him feel important. John’s involvement with Amanda is based on:
a. ego needs.
b. courtly love.
c. social principles.
d. shared interests.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. The dating continuum demonstrates that American dating:
a. is rarely committed and follows no formal process.
b. flows from casual dating of many people to marriage.
c. is too open to have set categories.
d. understands the individual needs in mate selection.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. Roberto and Juanita are going steady. Their next step on the dating continuum is likely to be:
a. informal commitment.
b. marriage.
c. cohabitation.
d. engagement.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. In light of the discussion of the dating continuum, we may conclude that:
a. modern dating is becoming more formal.
b. informal commitment causes people to go steady.
c. men receive fewer benefits from dating.
d. mate selection is a gradual process.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. It is difficult to describe a common American dating pattern because young people’s interactions have become more:
a. egalitarian.
b. interracial.
c. individualized.
d. interpersonal.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. More traditional, formalized dating is still found in:
a. poor communities.
b. small towns.
c. private schools.
d. the Northeast.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. All of the following statements about high school dating are true EXCEPT:
a. couples usually don’t know one another well when they first date.
b. there is a lot of gossip about who is dating whom.
c. friends play a major role in the selection process.
d. the person you are dating can hurt or enhance your reputation.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   3

 

  1. Which of the following examples best demonstrates “hanging out” as opposed to dating among college students?
a. going out to dinner
b. meeting at a coffee shop
c. calling just to talk
d. asking someone to go to a party

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   3

 

  1. Compared to high school dating, college dating is characterized by:
a. fewer rules.
b. less dating diversity.
c. endless gossip.
d. more friend involvement.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   3

 

  1. One of the main benefits of group dating is that it:
a. provides premarital couple training.
b. reduces the chances of unwanted sexual contact.
c. fosters a higher degree of commitment than casual dating.
d. exposes students to formal dating rules.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   3

 

  1. For many college men and women, dating is synonymous with a relationship defined as a sex-without-commitment interaction known as:
a. “joined at the hip.”
b. “going steady.”
c. “hooking up.”
d. “going together.”

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   3

 

  1. John and Beth are a college couple involved in a fast-moving, highly committed relationship. They often spend every waking minute together when they are not in class, but rarely go on a “date.” John and Beth are:
a. “joined at the hip.”
b. “going steady.”
c. “hooking up.”
d. engaged.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   3

 

  1. The dramatic increase in the number of people living alone has been attributed to:
a. deep-seated commitment and extended singleness.
b. high divorce rates and extended singleness.
c. courtly love and extended singleness.
d. formal engagements and extended singleness.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Dating and Extended Singleness

OBJ:   4

 

  1. For most Americans, singleness is:
a. a mark of disgrace.
b. a period of sexual abstinence.
c. a transitory state.
d. better than remarriage.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Dating and Extended Singleness

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Public acceptance of singleness has been fueled by all of the following factors EXCEPT:
a. greater educational opportunity.
b. the women’s movement.
c. homogamous mate selection.
d. changing attitudes toward premarital sex.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Dating and Extended Singleness

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Older couples who marry after a long period of singleness may discover that:
a. their chances of marital success are significantly reduced.
b. the endogamy rule only applies to young couples.
c. it is difficult to make marital compromises.
d. reciprocity generally leads to self-disclosure.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Dating and Extended Singleness

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Marrying late in life has been linked to:
a. marital success.
b. economic problems.
c. sexual infidelity.
d. the halo effect.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Dating and Extended Singleness

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Cox and Demmitt believe that the most attractive feature of the single life is the fact that it offers people:
a. sexual variety.
b. a sense of freedom.
c. financial security.
d. commitment opportunities.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Dating and Extended Singleness

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Despite social changes in singleness:
a. the idea of marriage remains strong in America.
b. young adults who do not graduate college marry younger.
c. men want to keep independence and do not push commitment.
d. remaining single has little social appeal.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Dating and Extended Singleness

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Cox and Demmitt argue that much of the music listened to by American teenagers tends to romanticize:
a. going steady.
b. violence.
c. puberty.
d. teen pregnancy.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. What is the impact of changing sexual mores on women?
a. The double standard has been reinforced.
b. They opened women up to extramarital affairs and no repercussions.
c. They lessened her control of sexual interactions by indicating sexual behavior is acceptable.
d. They increased the acceptance of acquaintance rape.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. A father warns his daughter about premarital sex, but tells his son that he is becoming a “real” man when he finds out that he is sexually active. This is an example of:
a. homogamy.
b. endogamy.
c. the double standard.
d. complementary needs.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. The historical double standard is:
a. the central focus of dating.
b. unfair to young men.
c. a new sexual norm.
d. gradually disappearing.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. The majority of teenagers who have engaged in premarital intercourse report that:
a. it was against their will.
b. they were in “love.”
c. “it just happened.”
d. they wanted to experiment.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. A teenager’s first sexual experience is most likely to occur:
a. at the beginning of the summer.
b. in the home of one of the partners.
c. at a party where alcohol is present.
d. in a car owned by parents.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. The younger the first sexual experience:
a. the greater the likelihood that the female is older than the male.
b. the less likely it is to occur in a partner’s home.
c. the less likely it is to influence future sexual encounters.
d. the greater the likelihood that it is not consensual.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. A female’s first sexual experience is likely to take place with a male who is:
a. about the same age.
b. three years younger.
c. less than one year older.
d. several years older.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Cox and Demmitt believe that the best way to teach young people responsible sexual behavior is to:
a. provide them with good information.
b. encourage them to “just say no.”
c. limit contact with members of the opposite sex.
d. return to the values of the 1950s.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. According to research presented in the text, the primary reason a majority of adolescents regret engaging in sexual activity is that it:
a. resulted in pregnancy.
b. resulted in a sexually transmitted disease.
c. was inconsistent with their moral views.
d. led to the breakup of the relationship.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. All of the following are problems with sexual intercourse “just happening” with adolescents EXCEPT:
a. not being able to contemplate the principles involved in engaging in intercourse.
b. regretting the experience at some point.
c. overcoming the historical double standard.
d. lack of protection and exposure to teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Which of the following questions is consistent with the authors’ description of personal principles?
a. Do I think that there is a conflict between the sexual attitudes of my church and society?
b. What kind of sexual behavior do I believe would make the best kind of society?
c. Is my behavior going to harm the other person or myself, either physically or psychologically?
d. Can I handle the guilt feelings that may result from premarital sex?

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Cox and Demmitt argue that as an unmarried couple considers sexual intercourse, the difficult principles to uncover are:
a. personal.
b. psychological.
c. religious.
d. social.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Mary believes that premarital sex will make it difficult to enjoy sex after marriage. Her belief about premarital sexuality is based on:
a. social principles.
b. religious principles.
c. personal principles.
d. psychological principles.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Chris abstains from premarital sex because he feels uncomfortable about breaking society’s rules. His behavior is based on:
a. psychological principles.
b. social principles.
c. religious principles.
d. personal principles.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. In a recent survey of community college students, 90% of the respondents who were against premarital sex indicated that their beliefs were influenced by:
a. social principles.
b. psychological principles.
c. religious principles.
d. personal principles.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. In short-duration sexual encounters where communication is less open, there is a greater likelihood of:
a. unwanted pregnancy.
b. premature ejaculation.
c. sexually transmitted diseases.
d. the halo effect.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Teenage pregnancy has:
a. risen sharply.
b. risen slightly.
c. remained the same.
d. dropped significantly.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Most young women report that their first sexual experience was:
a. very romantic.
b. an act of rebellion.
c. a prelude to marriage.
d. not very enjoyable.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Nonmarital sex for the young in our culture is often poor quality because:
a. it is met with parental disapproval.
b. it typically ends with an unwanted pregnancy.
c. of the environment and sexual ignorance.
d. it makes later sexual experiences seem worse in comparison.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Cox and Demmitt prefer the term acquaintance violence because it is:
a. less stigmatizing than the term date rape.
b. a much broader term than date rape.
c. the official government term for date rape.
d. widely used by feminist scholars.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Date Rape and Courtship Violence

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Many couples dismiss minor aggression as a sign of:
a. changing mores.
b. homogamy.
c. stress.
d. sexual repression.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Date Rape and Courtship Violence

OBJ:   7

 

  1. All of the following statements about date rapists are true EXCEPT:
a. they feel great sexual deprivation.
b. most of them view women as property.
c. they are nontraditional in their sexual values.
d. most of them place a high value on sexuality.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Date Rape and Courtship Violence

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Misunderstandings about sex tend to be more common when:
a. drugs and alcohol are involved.
b. couples get married.
c. people practice homogamy.
d. men ignore the halo effect.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Date Rape and Courtship Violence

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Research demonstrates that there may be miscommunications around sexual intent because:
a. women do not listen to men when they talk.
b. men appear to confuse friendly behavior with sexual interest.
c. females view males in more sexual terms than males view females.
d. there is a fear of talking about sex.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Date Rape and Courtship Violence

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Date rape drugs have been used to sedate a person so that their date can have sex with them unknowingly. This type of drug also causes:
a. weight loss.
b. sleeplessness.
c. short-term memory loss.
d. hormonal imbalance.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Date Rape and Courtship Violence

OBJ:   7

 

  1. The term used to describe a situation where a couple lives together without being married is:
a. engagement.
b. cohabitation.
c. miscegenation.
d. exogamy.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8                    NAT:

 

  1. The increasing incidence of heterosexual cohabitation is, in part, directly related to the increase in:
a. conservative sexual mores.
b. the single lifestyle.
c. interracial marriages.
d. marriages of complementary needs.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. In the nineteenth century, most states legally recognized cohabiting couples as married after they had lived together for:
a. one year.
b. three years.
c. five years.
d. seven years.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. All of the following are reasons for an increase in cohabitation EXCEPT:
a. society’s increased tolerance for nonmarital sexual relations.
b. the decline in divorce makes people less wary of marriage.
c. increasing urbanization that leads to anonymity.
d. higher education and increasing entry of women into the workforce decreases women’s dependence on marriage.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. When asked why they are cohabiting, most elderly and/or retired cohabitants said that it allows them to:
a. have a sexual outlet.
b. stay mentally alert.
c. save money.
d. start a second family.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. Couples who view cohabiting as a permanent alternative to marriage usually argue that marriage is characterized by:
a. boredom and conflict.
b. jealousy and possessiveness.
c. too many legal constraints.
d. massive economic pressures.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. A significantly larger proportion of cohabiting women than noncohabiting women want to:
a. get married.
b. go to college.
c. enter the workforce.
d. abort unwanted pregnancies.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. Men are most apt to cohabit for:
a. companionship.
b. emotional security.
c. sex.
d. practical reasons.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. All of the following are reasons for cohabiting EXCEPT:
a. a trial marriage.
b. reducing the likelihood of divorce.
c. a permanent alternative to marriage.
d. a short-lived sexual fling.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. When compared to noncohabiting couples, couples who cohabit before marriage tend to have:
a. more children.
b. higher marital commitment.
c. higher divorce rates.
d. fewer arguments.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. Divorced individuals who cohabitate prior to remarriage report:
a. higher levels of marital satisfaction but also higher rates of marital instability.
b. lower levels of marital satisfaction and higher rates of marital instability.
c. higher levels of marital satisfaction and lower levels of marital instability.
d. lower levels of marital satisfaction and lower levels of marital instability.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. The term palimony was coined to describe:
a. engagements lasting more than two years.
b. sexual intercourse between close relatives.
c. settlements made to an nonmarried live-in partner.
d. the tendency to marry people with opposite characteristics.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. Cox and Demmitt use the term “field of desirables” to describe:
a. individuals who have stable personality traits.
b. people to whom we are attracted.
c. women who are single and have never had children.
d. single people who are free to engage in a relationship.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   9

 

  1. James is attracted to two women in his biology class. He is also interested in dating two women that he met at work. The term Cox and Demmitt used to describe these women is:
a. “potentials”
b. “desirables”
c. “compatibles”
d. “availables”

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   9

 

  1. Cox and Demmitt use the term “availables” to describe:
a. women who are guided by social principles.
b. couples who are not committed to their marriage.
c. people who are unmarried and not in love with anyone.
d. adults who desperately want to marry but can’t.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   9

 

  1. Our American social system has an impact on love and marriage in that:
a. we are increasingly seeing exogamous marriages.
b. our marriages are arranged by our parents who want homogamy.
c. we are free to love and marry who we choose.
d. we don’t fall in love with just anyone; our marriages tend toward homogamy.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   9

 

  1. A researcher discovers that most of the married couples in a moderate-sized Southern city grew up within a 10-mile radius. Her findings illustrate the principle of
a. exogamy.
b. complementary needs.
c. extended singleness.
d. propinquity.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   9

 

  1. Vance met and married Amanda while they were both stationed at Robbins Air Force Base. Their marriage illustrates the principle of:
a. propinquity.
b. exogamy.
c. inconclusiveness.
d. heterogamy.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   9

 

  1. Choosing to be with people who are similar to ourselves is called:
a. endogamy.
b. homogamy.
c. exogamy.
d. propinquity.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   9

 

  1. James and Nicole were initially attracted to each other because they both enjoy photography, rock climbing, and organic gardening. The available evidence suggests that their relationship is based on:
a. propinquity.
b. endogamy.
c. miscegenation.
d. homogamy.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   9

 

  1. The inclination or necessity to marry within a particular group is called:
a. endogamy.
b. miscegenation.
c. exogamy.
d. propinquity.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   9

 

  1. Ron grew up in the South. He is so proud of his Southern heritage that he wants his daughter to marry a Southerner. Ron’s behavior illustrates the principle of:
a. complementary needs.
b. availability.
c. endogamy.
d. cognitive compatibility.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   9

 

  1. Elite colleges and universities tend to promote:
a. cognitive compatibility.
b. miscegenation.
c. complementary needs.
d. endogamy.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   9

 

  1. ____ is one of the strongest endogamic factors.
a. Attractiveness
b. Education
c. Geography
d. Occupation

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. All of the following background factors are predictive of marital stability EXCEPT:
a. religious participation.
b. supportive friends.
c. the wife’s education.
d. financial success.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Marty and Janelle have dated for a few months and are planning on getting married next year. Marty graduated from college two years ago and has a good job as an architect. Janelle is a few years younger and although she didn’t finish college, she enjoys her job as an assistant at the pet clinic. Marty and Janelle are an example of:
a. monogamy.
b. the halo effect.
c. miscegenation.
d. the marital gradient.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Research demonstrates that couples who have similar backgrounds and preferences are:
a. more likely to be happy when they first marry, but are no more or less likely to be happily married later on.
b. more likely to be happily married later on.
c. are no more or less likely to be happily married later on.
d. are less likely to be happily married later on.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. One rule of exogamy is the requirement that we marry someone of the opposite sex. Until recently, this was taken for granted. Why is this important for society?
a. It maintains the sanctity of marriage.
b. It ensures reproduction and the continuation of the species.
c. The rule justifies discrimination and miscegenation.
d. It creates a necessary opening for homosexual marriages.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT a major social group in endogamous marriages?
a. race/ethnicity
b. religion
c. political party
d. social class

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Miscegenation laws prohibited:
a. marriages between siblings.
b. same-sex marriages.
c. interracial marriages.
d. marriages between teenagers.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. About 30 states had miscegenation laws as recently as:
a. World War I.
b. the 1920s.
c. the Great depression.
d. World War II.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. In Loving v. Virginia, the U. S. Supreme Court ruled that:
a. marriages between stepchildren and stepparents were illegal.
b. cohabiting couples were financially tied to one another.
c. laws prohibiting interracial marriages were unconstitutional.
d. minors could not marry without parental permission.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Which of the following is true of interracial marriages?
a. The number of interracial marriages more than doubled from 1980 to 2008.
b. Interracial marriages make up half of all marriages.
c. Interracial marriages are more common, but most Americans report that they would not support a family member in an interracial marriage.
d. Interracial marriages are still illegal in eight states.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. The inclination or necessity to marry outside a particular group is called:
a. homogamy.
b. exogamy.
c. miscegenation.
d. endogamy.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. A man who marries his niece is violating the:
a. exogamy rule.
b. miscegenation rule.
c. endogamy rule.
d. propinquity rule.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. John and Robert have been involved in a same-sex relationship for two years. They can’t marry because our society has a(n):
a. miscegenation rule.
b. endogamy rule.
c. exogamy rule.
d. propinquity rule.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Physical attractiveness as a first impression is:
a. a relatively unimportant marital choice variable.
b. more important to men than to women.
c. more important to women than to men.
d. just as important to women as to men.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. The tendency for first impressions to influence subsequent judgements is called:
a. homogamy.
b. the exogamy rule.
c. self-disclosure.
d. the halo effect.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. In order to assess cognitive compatibility, we try to:
a. estimate how another person thinks.
b. evaluate our body image.
c. use attraction-seeking strategies.
d. maximize our halo effect.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Which of the following questions would probably be asked by an individual who is trying to access another person’s cognitive compatibility?
a. “Do you listen to classical music?”
b. “What did you say your name was?”
c. “When do final exams start?”
d. “Do you know how to get to the interstate?”

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Albert constantly tells Mary how much he admires her, offers to help her with her homework, and always agrees with what she says. Albert is trying to further his relationship with Mary by using:
a. endogamic rules.
b. self-disclosure techniques.
c. social principles.
d. attraction-seeking strategies.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Self-disclosure tends to lead to:
a. increased marital conflict.
b. reciprocity.
c. short-lived sexual flings.
d. divorce.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. In a relationship based on complementary needs:
a. the partners have almost identical social characteristics.
b. each partner enters the marriage expecting to change the other person.
c. the partners are similar in age and energy levels, but differ widely in interest.
d. each partner is able to supply something the other lacks.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Ray is in a relationship with a woman who was thrifty to help control his wild spending sprees. His relationship illustrates the principle of:
a. cognitive compatibility.
b. exogamy.
c. endogamy.
d. complementary needs.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Engagement has become:
a. less formal.
b. an extension of cohabitation.
c. a religious event.
d. a trial marriage.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Engagement   OBJ:   11

 

  1. The final courtship stage is:
a. dating.
b. engagement.
c. marriage.
d. divorce.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Engagement   OBJ:   11

 

  1. Susie and Johnny just got engaged at Christmas. They plan to marry in May. Their engagement can be classified as:
a. short and romantic.
b. long and separated.
c. long and inclusive.
d. short and determined.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Engagement   OBJ:   11

 

  1. Cox and Demmitt believe that short engagements don’t give couples much insight into:
a. traditional engagement practices.
b. each other’s personalities.
c. their sexual compatibility.
d. changing dating patterns.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Engagement   OBJ:   11

 

  1. One of the main issues in long, separated engagements is:
a. indecisiveness.
b. date rape.
c. alimony.
d. exclusivity.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Engagement   OBJ:   11

 

  1. Cox and Demmitt argue that engagements are functional because they provide all of the following benefits EXCEPT:
a. premarital counseling.
b. premarital medical examinations.
c. extensive legal protection.
d. time to examine long-range goals.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Engagement   OBJ:   11

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. Every society has a system by which mates are selected and new families are started.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Introduction   OBJ:   1

 

  1. Open choice of a mate means that parents of young adults have no influence at all.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Introduction   OBJ:   1

 

  1. On the whole, starting early and remaining in a steady relationship throughout adolescence is probably disadvantageous to later adult relations.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. The rate of people “going steady” is gradually increasing.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating

OBJ:   2

 

  1. Young women have become more like young men in their sexual behavior.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. American sexual mores have become increasingly conservative.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. The younger the first experience, the greater the likelihood that first intercourse was involuntary.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Sexually transmitted diseases are more common among the unmarried than the married.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Avoiding pregnancy or STDs are the main reasons young people cite for not having sexual intercourse.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Healthy sexual expression is a primary part of human intimacy.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Women and men initiate verbal or physical aggression in about equal numbers.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Date Rape and Courship Violence

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Researchers have consistently found that physical aggression is more common in married couples than in cohabiting couples.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Date Rape and Courship Violence

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Females view males in more sexual terms than males view females.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Date Rape and Courship Violence

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Premarital cohabitation appears to raise the risk of subsequent marital dissolution.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. The presence of children seems to have a stabilizing effect on cohabitation relationships.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. In some states, a divorced person who is receiving alimony may lose it for cohabiting.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. The tendency to marry individuals similar to ourselves is called propinquity.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   9

 

  1. The increasing levels of education and workforce participation among women have little impact on marriage.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Dating and Extended Singleness

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Wives’ education appears to be unrelated to marital stability.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Same-sex marriages have no legal standing and there is no pressure to recognize such marriages.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Some people tend to avoid highly attractive individuals in order to enhance their own chances of acceptance.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Meeting via the Internet has lessened the importance of attractiveness as an early factor in meeting another person.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Finding the One and Only: Mate Selection

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Engagement is the culmination of courtship.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Engagement   OBJ:   11

 

  1. The phrase “absence makes the heart grow fonder” is often used to describe short, romantic engagements.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Engagement   OBJ:   11

 

  1. A truly successful engagement period leads either to a successful marriage or to a broken engagement.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Engagement   OBJ:   11

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. Why do we date?

 

ANS:

Dating fills the time between puberty and marriage, it is a way to gain social status, it is an opportunity to interact with and learn about the opposite sex, it meets ego needs, and it leads to mate selection.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating            OBJ:   2

 

  1. Differentiate between dating in high school and dating in college.

 

ANS:

High school dating involves one’s friends; gossip makes the dating process more serious; there is more difficulty and embarrassment involved; and group dating is more common. In college, dating tends to be more relaxed with fewer rules; dating or courtship has been replaced by “hooking up” (sex without commitment) and “joined at the hip” couples who are fast-moving and highly committed but rarely go on dates.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Premarital American Dating            OBJ:   3

 

  1. Why is being single considered only a transitory state?

 

ANS:

Despite the increase in singleness, most Americans usually get married or remarried.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Dating and Extended Singleness     OBJ:   4

 

  1. What are the advantages of being single?

 

ANS:

Freedom, lower expenses, and less relational conflicts.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Dating and Extended Singleness     OBJ:   4

 

  1. What are the negative and positive effects of remaining single longer?

 

ANS:

The negative effects included increased risk of problems during pregnancy, being older parents, having fewer children (which impacts other industries), and more difficulty compromising. The positive effects include better economic circumstances, willingness to communicate and work toward a positive experience, and a greater chance of marital success.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Dating and Extended Singleness     OBJ:   4

 

  1. In a society that supposedly prohibits premarital sexual relations, evaluate the underlying messages given by society about sexuality.

 

ANS:

Advertising  based on sex appeal, popular music with major themes of sex, young people being given the resources to determine their own sexual behavior, and peer influences all contribute to the underlying messages that premarital sexual relations are expected.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores                  OBJ:   6

 

  1. An unmarried couple contemplating sexual intercourse should consider personal, psychological, social and religious principles. Compare these principles.

 

ANS:

Personal principles are used as a guide in our lives; psychological principles are those that are ingrained in us by society and family; social principles are rules that are placed by society; and religious principles are obtained through religious training.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores                  OBJ:   6

 

  1. How might individuals evaluate if their sexual behavior is healthy?

 

ANS:

They can ask themselves questions to understand their attitudes surrounding sex. Questions about enhancing self-esteem, freely-chosen sexual expression, enjoyment and gratification from sex, and risks of pregnancy or STDs will help an individual understand if their sexual behavior is healthy.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Changing Sexual Mores                  OBJ:   6

 

  1. Who stands to lose the most in a cohabitating relationship, men or women? Give reasons.

 

ANS:

Women. Studies indicate that males seem less committed than females, cohabitating men are less likely to be employed, gender attitudes tend to be traditional, cohabitating males are less considerate than husbands, and cohabitating women experience more abuse.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Cohabitation: Unmarried-Couple Households

OBJ:   8

 

  1. Compare the three types of engagement.

 

ANS:

The short, romantic engagement lasts from two to six months. It usually fails to give the couple much insight into one another’s personalities because much of the time is taken up by preparation for the wedding. The long, separated engagement tends to defeat the purpose of engagement and raises questions of exclusivity in the relationship. The separation is usually unsatisfactory for both. The long but inconclusive engagement is an engagement that is put off for economic reasons, deference to parental demands, or indecisiveness. This is usually a sign that all is not well between them.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Engagement   OBJ:   11

 

CHAPTER 7—MARRIAGE, INTIMACY, EXPECTATIONS, AND THE FULLY FUNCTIONING PERSON

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Within a marriage, which type of needs to most adults NOT try to fulfill?
a. physical
b. psychological
c. material
d. sexual

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage Matters

OBJ:   1

 

  1. A good marriage acts as a ____ against mental health problems such as alienation, loneliness, unhappiness, and depression.
a. barrier
b. buffer
c. cure
d. function

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage Matters

OBJ:   1

 

  1. Married men have longer life expectancies than:
a. single men.
b. single women.
c. married women.
d. cohabitating men and women.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage Matters

OBJ:   1

 

  1. Marriage increases the likelihood that fathers will:
a. have good relationships with their children.
b. have children with greater chance of divorce.
c. have a greater impact than mothers.
d. have shortened life expectancies.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage Matters

OBJ:   1

 

  1. Children who grow up with two biological and successfully married parents are more likely to:
a. be more popular.
b. be overweight.
c. have better physical health.
d. get divorced themselves.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage Matters

OBJ:   1

 

  1. Boys raised in single-parent homes:
a. have similar outcomes to boys raised in two-parent homes.
b. are twice as likely to commit a crime leading to incarceration by the time they reach their early 30s.
c. have greater risks of problems than boys raised in stepfamilies.
d. are better off than girls in single-parent homes.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage Matters

OBJ:   1

 

  1. All of the following tasks are associated with the transition to married life EXCEPT:
a. living within a prescribed budget.
b. developing new relationships with parents.
c. shifting from self-centeredness to other-centeredness.
d. learning to do leisure activities on the spur of the moment.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   The Transition from Single to Married Life

OBJ:   2

 

  1. According to Wallerstein, one of the essential tasks of happily married couples is to:
a. reach an agreement about marital expectations.
b. establish pleasurable sexual relationships.
c. adjust to the constant demands of in-laws.
d. become a team that pulls together.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   The Transition from Single to Married Life

OBJ:   2

 

  1. Excessive workplace and family obligations can make it difficult for married couples to:
a. develop a definition of marital success.
b. establish pleasurable sexual relationships.
c. react to their perceptions of the world.
d. understand their unconscious marital expectations.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   The Transition from Single to Married Life

OBJ:   2

 

  1. The best way to characterize the transition from singlehood to marriage is:
a. from chaotic change to stagnant reality.
b. from the simplicity of singlehood to the complexity of marriage.
c. from the self-centeredness of childhood to the other-centeredness of adulthood.
d. from a system of individual expectations to one of individual actions.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   The Transition from Single to Married Life

OBJ:   2

 

  1. According to Cox and Demmitt, family interaction is:
a. passionate and irrational.
b. intimate and complex.
c. mundane and boring.
d. tense and volatile.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. The role interactions that occur in marriage become more complicated when:
a. couples are passionately in love.
b. children enter the picture.
c. people marry at a young age.
d. husbands and wives are similar.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   2

 

  1. All of the following contribute to our psychological need for intimacy EXCEPT:
a. large bureaucratic institutions.
b. increased economic strains.
c. increased anonymity.
d. increased mobility.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. Sexual intercourse during marriage is:
a. a forgivable sin.
b. state-mandated.
c. an important material need.
d. part of the self-actualization process.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. Marital disruption is considerably higher among families that are:
a. in economic trouble.
b. involved in cross-interactions.
c. based on prenuptial contracts.
d. fairly traditional.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. Marriages in Japan are characterized by different goals than those in the United States. Which of the following is an example of a Japanese marriage goal not shared by the United States?
a. The husband and wife work toward an intimate emotionally fulfilling marriage.
b. The husband puts his family first once married.
c. Both men and women select a mate themselves to meet their psychological needs.
d. The wife agrees to provide a home and raise the children mostly on her own.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. In their study of successful marriages, Lauer and Lauer (1985) found that fewer than 10% of the respondents felt that their marriage was held together by:
a. material needs.
b. intimacy.
c. a good sexual relationship.
d. religious beliefs.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. When psychological needs are not met in a marriage, trouble is most likely to appear in:
a. the sexual relationship.
b. cross-interactions.
c. parenting activities.
d. family decision making.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. Marital success is:
a. measured in economic terms.
b. difficult to define.
c. an American myth.
d. rarely studied.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Defining Marital Success

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Marital success is often confused with:
a. passion.
b. intimacy.
c. happiness.
d. love.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Defining Marital Success

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Cox and Demmitt’s definition of marital success encompasses all of the following elements EXCEPT:
a. passion.
b. marital adjustment.
c. happiness.
d. permanence.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Defining Marital Success

OBJ:   4

 

  1. How are marital interaction and partner happiness related?
a. They are virtually unrelated.
b. If a partner is not happy, no amount of positive marital interaction can change that.
c. Marriage and happiness are opposite emotional states.
d. They have reciprocal effects.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Defining Marital Success

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Happiness tends to occur in marriages that are characterized by:
a. high levels of passion.
b. positive interaction.
c. individualism.
d. middle-class values.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Defining Marital Success

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Successful marriages exhibit all of the following characteristics EXCEPT:
a. relative agreement on important issues.
b. teamwork.
c. positive partner interaction.
d. constant passion.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Defining Marital Success

OBJ:   4

 

  1. The best predictors of marital success are:
a. age at marriage and the presence of children.
b. premarital sexuality and financial problems.
c. sexual attraction and passion.
d. friendship and egalitarian gender roles.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Defining Marital Success

OBJ:   4

 

  1. In general, the younger the age at marriage, the greater the risk of:
a. cross-interactions.
b. marital failure.
c. fraud.
d. mental incapacity.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Defining Marital Success

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Americans have freedom to build the kind of relationship they desire. This freedom creates:
a. a large responsibility on the individual for the success or failure of the relationship.
b. increased intimacy and passion for each other.
c. social factors that have no impact on relationships.
d. marital stability.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Defining Marital Success

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Most Americans build their intimate relationships on a foundation of:
a. sexual gratification.
b. love.
c. material needs.
d. egalitarianism.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Defining Marital Success

OBJ:   4

 

  1. One of the major characteristics of the strong, resilient family is the desire to:
a. maintain traditional family roles.
b. obtain material wealth.
c. nurture the individual pursuit of self-fulfillment.
d. spend time together.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. Through their research, Stinnett and DeFrain found that the happiest childhood memories recalled by their subjects almost always involved:
a. time spent in family activities.
b. serious events like funerals.
c. childhood friends.
d. early school experiences.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. The family in which both partners are employed outside the home is called a:
a. two-career family.
b. nuclear family.
c. dual-earner family.
d. commuter marriage.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. In the past, there was a fear of losing individuality from too much _________; today, the opposite problem is more common.
a. recreation
b. togetherness
c. responsibility
d. money

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. One of the most pervasive enemies facing dual-earner families is:
a. constant change.
b. unemployment.
c. lack of time.
d. television.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. The notion that “it is not the quantity but the quality of time together that counts” seems to ignore the fact that:
a. it is impossible to measure quality of time.
b. quality and quantity of time are interrelated.
c. most parents give their families both quality and quantity of time.
d. intimate interactions can’t be quantified.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. Families are working at playing when they:
a. pursue hobbies that are extremely expensive.
b. engage in activities that are an extension of a spouse’s career.
c. spend too much time organizing their recreational activities.
d. attempt to confine quality time to weekends and holidays.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. Almost all strong families indicate that they:
a. spend an inordinate amount of time planning their play activities.
b. don’t feel pressured by time constraints.
c. place the needs of the individual over the needs of the family.
d. eat together at least once a day.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. What percentage of families report eating at least five meals together per week?
a. 20%
b. 40%
c. 60%
d. 80%

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. Cox and Demmitt believe that families can develop a sense of history by:
a. adopting traditional roles.
b. spending time together.
c. meeting material needs.
d. making good decisions.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. Phenomenology is the study of:
a. how people experience their world.
b. marriage and family myths.
c. childhood sexual development.
d. the physiological symptoms of love.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. When the honeymoon is over, couples tend to:
a. think about their long-term career goals and objectives.
b. reexamine their unrealistic expectations about marriage.
c. turn their attention to their in-laws.
d. exhibit a high degree of spontaneity.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. When someone has too high expectations, they may “throw away” the real person in favor of:
a. an extramarital affair.
b. a close friend.
c. their family.
d. their own idealizations.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. If we refuse to examine our ideals and expectations in marriage:
a. our partner will rise to our ideals.
b. we can expect conflict and disappointment.
c. we trade happiness for perfection.
d. we can create the perfect mate.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Realizing the humanness of our partners allows us to:
a. see the world through rose-colored glasses.
b. influence him/her in the direction of our expectations.
c. relax and be human as well.
d. develop a high degree of spontaneity.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. The prevailing cultural view of marriage as expressed in the mass media is one of everlasting:
a. boredom.
b. conflict.
c. romance.
d. commitment.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Frequently, ____________ gets confused with ___________, which can lead to disappointment in marriage.
a. compatibility; sexual attraction
b. individualism; identity loss
c. sexual attraction; love
d. psychological needs; material needs

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. The following entity that has the greatest impact on our marital role expectations is:
a. the marriage contract.
b. parents’ marriage.
c. sexual needs.
d. the peer group.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Conflicting role expectations tend to occur when roles are:
a. unclear.
b. important.
c. longitudinal.
d. extramarital.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. The strongest factor influencing the success of a relationship is:
a. commitment to the relationship.
b. sexual attraction.
c. an open attitude about having children.
d. romantic love.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Supporting the family when trouble arises illustrates the principle of:
a. dependence.
b. acceptance.
c. commitment.
d. openness.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Long-lasting commitment creates:
a. passion and romance.
b. boredom and dissatisfaction.
c. family stability.
d. frustration and jealousy.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Individuation means that individual family members are encouraged to:
a. pursue their own goals at the expense of the family.
b. have independent thoughts, feelings, and judgments.
c. adopt the marital roles used by their parents.
d. treat family members better than strangers.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Unfaithfulness occurs more often with:
a. married men.
b. married women.
c. couples who are separated but not divorced.
d. cohabitating men and women.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. What percentage of the general public state that it is always or almost always wrong to have sex outside of marriage?
a. 50%
b. 90%
c. 70%
d. 65%

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. All of the following factors correlate with greater acceptance of extramarital affairs EXCEPT:
a. being young and male.
b. being in a cohabiting relationship.
c. being politically liberal.
d. having a high school education or less.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. The increase in the number of younger wives having affairs has been attributed to:
a. sexual explicit media images.
b. higher educational levels among women.
c. women entering the labor force.
d. the emergence of American individualism.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Career women who prefer to remain unmarried but look to fulfill needs for companionship and a sexual relationship seek:
a. single career-focused men.
b. single working-class men.
c. married men.
d. homosexual relationships.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. The most threatening aspect of an affair:
a. is the physical relationship.
b. is the loss of economic support.
c. is the detrimental social image.
d. stems from falling in love with a new partner.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. The long-term extramarital affair is characterized by:
a. egalitarian gender roles.
b. a strong emotional attachment.
c. boredom and tension.
d. complete commitment.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Which of the following statements about men and extramarital affairs is NOT true?
a. They take their extramarital affairs more seriously than women.
b. The main focus is on the sexual aspects of the affair.
c. Affairs are associated with increased marital happiness.
d. Their affairs are shorter than the ones experienced by women.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Women tend to associate their affairs with:
a. sexual needs.
b. gender equality.
c. decreasing marital satisfaction.
d. sin and lust.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Extramarital affairs occur for all of the following reasons EXCEPT:
a. rebellion.
b. simple curiosity.
c. individuation.
d. sexual variety.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Extramarital affairs are difficult for a spouse to combat because:
a. affairs provide excitement that is difficult to bring back into a long marriage.
b. the spouse has declined physically and does not seek to be appealing.
c. the search for identity in the affair is too great.
d. most often they are unaware of the affair.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. John and Ellen are having an extramarital affair. When their spouses found out, Ellen’s husband was very distress about her sexual infidelity. John’s wife was distressed about:
a. sexually transmitted diseases.
b. her financial future.
c. his emotional infidelity.
d. the children.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Practical and emotional problems that accompany the maintenance of an extramarital affair include all EXCEPT:
a. legal problems.
b. a private place to meet.
c. coping with guilt and anxiety.
d. the risk of jeopardizing the primary relationship.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. A cornerstone of a strong and enduring relationship that is damaged in extramarital affairs is:
a. understanding.
b. trust.
c. love.
d. expectation.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. The self-fulfilling prophecy occurs when the expectations you hold about another person tend to:
a. romanticize and idealize that person.
b. destroy your ability to communicate with that person.
c. influence that person in the direction of the expectations.
d. prevent the person from becoming self-actualized.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Holding slightly high expectations about another person is productive if the expectations are:
a. based on the fulfillment of your needs.
b. effectively communicated to the other person.
c. consistent with the basic principles of phenomenology.
d. close enough to reality to allow the person to fulfill them.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. The definition of mental health embraces all of the following elements EXCEPT:
a. feeling comfortable about oneself.
b. feeling competent to meet the demands of life.
c. feeling a need for privacy and autonomy.
d. feeling comfortable about other people.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1

REF:   The Self-Actualized Person in the Fully Functioning Family

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Mature, mentally healthy people:
a. are able to take advantage of others.
b. are “people who need people.”
c. pass responsibility to others.
d. set idealized unrealistic goals.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1

REF:   The Self-Actualized Person in the Fully Functioning Family

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Self-actualization refers to:
a. the state of being highly critical of others.
b. a constant striving for perfection.
c. the process of reaching one’s full potential as a person.
d. a person’s ability to disclose personal information.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1

REF:   The Self-Actualized Person in the Fully Functioning Family

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Self-actualized people exhibit all of the following traits EXCEPT:
a. a need for privacy.
b. spontaneity.
c. a problem-centered focus.
d. self-centeredness.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1

REF:   The Self-Actualized Person in the Fully Functioning Family

OBJ:   7

 

  1. According to Cox and Demmitt, the retention and projection of time enables us to:
a. be highly spontaneous.
b. cope with the present.
c. avoid individuation.
d. neutralize the self-fulfilling prophecy.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1

REF:   The Self-Actualized Person in the Fully Functioning Family

OBJ:   8

 

  1. An example of someone who projects consequences into the future that keeps them from acting in the present would say:
a. “I won’t travel to Europe this summer because there might be a war somewhere over there.”
b. “I love my family so much that I want to make sure they are eating healthy foods.”
c. “My husband doesn’t spend much time with our children.”
d. “Our 401K retirement plans are increasing every year.”

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1

REF:   The Self-Actualized Person in the Fully Functioning Family

OBJ:   8

 

  1. There may be nothing more important for the well-being and optimal functioning of human beings than:
a. a high degree of sexual compatibility with a partner.
b. true intimacy with others.
c. the presence of children in your life.
d. marital reciprocity and compatibility.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1

REF:   The Self-Actualized Person in the Fully Functioning Family

OBJ:   9

 

  1. All of the following goals are associated with intimacy EXCEPT:
a. continued freshness of appreciation.
b. crisis management.
c. growing in a fulfilling manner.
d. emotional gratification.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1

REF:   The Self-Actualized Person in the Fully Functioning Family

OBJ:   9

 

  1. Societies set minimum standards for marriage in the interest of:
a. romantic love.
b. order and stability.
c. growth and self-actualization.
d. religious values.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. In Western societies, the primary responsibility for assuring the legitimacy of children is assigned to the:
a. state.
b. family.
c. church.
d. individual.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. In Western societies, marital laws focus on all of the following tasks EXCEPT:
a. endorsing monogamous marriages.
b. protecting property and inheritance rights.
c. preventing unacceptable marriages.
d. providing emotional gratification.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. In the United States, marriage laws are established by:
a. the church.
b. individual states.
c. the Supreme Court.
d. city governments.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. State marriage contracts contain all of the following elements EXCEPT:
a. an age requirement.
b. mutual consent.
c. religious sacrament.
d. a waiting period.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. According to Cox and Demmitt, the marriage contract involves three parties: the man, the woman, and:
a. their families.
b. the church.
c. their children.
d. the state.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. The marriage contract can only be dissolved by:
a. the church.
b. mutual consent of both spouses.
c. the state.
d. lawyers.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. The state may consider a marriage invalid under certain circumstances, including when:
a. one partner is caught committing adultery.
b. the wedding ceremony was not performed by a minister.
c. either party is physically unable to perform sex.
d. couples cross state lines to get married.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Although common, a marriage ceremony is not necessary, but the couple must:
a. declare their intent in front of a person solemnizing the marriage and two witnesses.
b. declare intent to a minister or clergy.
c. go through a physical exam and demonstrate evidence of economic stability.
d. declare intent within one week of receiving a license.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. A marriage may be considered legally invalid if:
a. permission to marry was not granted by the bride’s parents.
b. consent to marry is obtained by fraud.
c. one person is Protestant and the other is Catholic.
d. the couple lied about their feelings toward one another.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Traditional marriage vows are based on the belief that marriage is:
a. sexual.
b. permanent.
c. idealistic.
d. sequential.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Religious faiths believe that marriage is:
a. contractual.
b. personal.
c. a sacrament.
d. a social institution.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. In many religious faiths, the marriage is supposed to be witnessed and blessed by:
a. parents.
b. God.
c. church members.
d. the community.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. One of the implied conditions of the marriage contract is that the wife must:
a. give her husband a home life without compensation.
b. help support the family if she has an estate.
c. control the couple’s sexual interaction.
d. learn to tolerate her in-laws.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. State marriage contracts require husbands to:
a. support their wives.
b. accommodate their in-laws.
c. give their wives companionship.
d. legally adopt their stepchildren.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT a reason that domestic partnership laws are controversial?
a. People feel they undermine marriage.
b. They provide equality in intimate partner relationships.
c. Businesses fear increased costs.
d. Cohabitors fear the legal recognition of a cohabiting relationship will take away their freedoms.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   11

 

  1. Domestic partnership ordinances require couples to:
a. undergo premarital counseling.
b. publicly register their relationship.
c. go through a traditional wedding ceremony.
d. sign a standard prenuptial contract.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   11

 

  1. A typical ordinance that recognizes domestic partnership defines partners as:
a. two financially interdependent adults.
b. homosexuals.
c. cohabitators.
d. legally related but biologically.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   11

 

  1. The first state to grant the right of marriage to homosexual couples in 2004 was:
a. Connecticut.
b. California.
c. Oregon.
d. Massachusetts.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   11

 

  1. Some people who prefer cohabitation over marriage feel that domestic partnership laws:
a. are undermining marriage.
b. should be adopted by all states.
c. discriminate against heterosexual couples.
d. threaten their freedom.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   11

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT a common difficult question about domestic partnership policies?
a. How should domestic partnership be defined?
b. How extensive should benefit coverage be?
c. Will marriage be obsolete?
d. How should the tax structure respond to domestic partnership?

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   11

 

  1. Prenuptial contracts offer all of the following benefits EXCEPT:
a. movement toward more egalitarian relationships.
b. freedom from state contract obligations.
c. an opportunity for open and honest communication.
d. increased marital predictability and security.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   12

 

  1. Prenuptial agreements tend to promote:
a. sex-based marriages.
b. religious values.
c. egalitarian relationships.
d. deceit and dishonesty.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   12

 

  1. Some feel that having a prenuptial agreement is negative because it:
a. isn’t legally binding.
b. demonstrates a lack of trust in your future mate.
c. leads to divorce.
d. takes away the individual rights of both partners.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   12

 

  1. Prenuptial contracts cover all of the following areas EXCEPT:
a. aims and expectations of the couple.
b. income and expense handling and control.
c. minimum age requirements for marriage.
d. responsibility for household tasks.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   12

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. The ability of adults to fulfill their psychological, material, and sexual needs has nothing to do with the success of their marriage.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. It is likely that if a person has the ability to be successful and manage interactions in marriage, they will be successful in other interpersonal relationships.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. Marital disruption is highest among those least well-off materially.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. Religious involvement has a positive association with marital quality.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. Marital expectations are higher for Americans than for other people around the world.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. Marriage in Japan is based more on role fulfillment than love and intimacy.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. Researchers have developed a definitive list of factors that influence a couple’s ability to attain marital success.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Defining Marital Success

OBJ:   4

 

  1. Over time, a marriage will fail if the romantic love changes.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. Outside factors such as lack of support have no effect on the intimate relationship.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. Eating at least one meal a day together is an indication of a strong family.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families

OBJ:   5

 

  1. Phenomenology is the study of how people experience their world.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Many of our expectations of role behavior come from our experience with our parents.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Strong commitment to one’s family should not mean the loss of individuality.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Less than 50% of all Americans believe in faithfulness in marriage.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Because Peter and Greta are cohabitating, they will be less likely to accept the fact that Peter’s boss is having an extramarital affair.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Consensual adultery has greatly diminished during the past several decades.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Generally speaking, women tend to take their extramarital affairs more lightly than men.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations

OBJ:   6

 

  1. Sara can be described as mentally healthy because she is comfortable with herself, she is tolerant of others, and she accepts responsibility.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1

REF:   The Self-Actualized Person in the Fully Functioning Family

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Self-actualized people prefer to retreat to pleasant fantasies rather than to cope with unpleasant realities.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1

REF:   The Self-Actualized Person in the Fully Functioning Family

OBJ:   7

 

  1. How one handles conflict is the single most important predictor of whether a marriage will survive.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1

REF:   The Self-Actualized Person in the Fully Functioning Family

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Although the requirements differ, all states recognize marriages contracted in all other states.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Although most marriages in the United States take place in a church, marriage is not seen as a sacrament.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. A responsibility of a husband is to support his wife and family, even though his wife may have a career and estate of her own.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   10

 

  1. Domestic partnerships are seen by some as attempts by the gay rights movement to gain the right of marriage.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   11

 

  1. A prenuptial contract or agreement can legally override a state marriage contract.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   12

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. Why does “marriage matter”?

 

ANS:

Marriage provides a buffer against mental health problems like alienation, loneliness, unhappiness, and depression. It helps family members deal with emotional crises. Marriage reduces the rates of poverty for women and children. It increases the likelihood that children will graduate from college and achieve high-status jobs.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage Matters                             OBJ:   1

 

  1. Society recognizes that fulfilling sexual, material, and psychological needs is a valid responsibility of marriage. Compare these three needs.

 

ANS:

Sexual needs refer to the legitimate outlet for sexual energy that is a state-mandated part of marriage. Material needs are the needs for breadwinning and homemaking that are essential for survival. Psychological needs are met when your spouse supplies personal validity and relevance as a confirmation of your existence.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Marriage: A Myriad of Interactions

OBJ:   3

 

  1. Define marital success and give examples.

 

ANS:

Marital success is defined to include adjustment, happiness, and permanence. Adjustment refers to the ease at which couples are comfortable with their roles and work together to solve problems. Happiness is expressed as satisfaction with the relationship.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Defining Marital Success                OBJ:   4

 

  1. Justify whether quality or quantity of time together is better for the family.

 

ANS:

Spending time together is an important measure of marital success. The idea that someone is physically present does not mean that time is spent together. On the other hand, there must be enough time for quality to surface. It may be necessary to realize that quality and quantity are interrelated and therefore cannot be compared.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Strong Relationships and Families  OBJ:   5

 

  1. Describe the marriage where romantic ideals are present and expectations are too high.

 

ANS:

One partner expects so much from their mate and the marriage that they are disappointed in the reality and begin to blame the mate for the discrepancy.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations                       OBJ:   6

 

  1. Summarize the expectation of permanence in a marriage.

 

ANS:

A successful marriage is one in which the couple’s expression of commitment to the permanence of the marriage is high. This is the single strongest factor influencing the success of the relationship.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations                       OBJ:   6

 

  1. Marriages in the United States have an expectation of primariness. Define this expectation and provide support from research presented in the text.

 

ANS:

Primariness is the belief that one’s sexual and emotional outlet is limited to one’s spouse. While results vary from study to study, recent findings of American sexual behavior are reporting lower percentages of unfaithfulness. In addition, about 90% of the public say it is always or almost always wrong for a married person to have sex outside of marriage.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations                       OBJ:   6

 

  1. Compare the long-term extramarital affair with the short-term extramarital affair.

 

ANS:

The long-term affair usually includes a strong emotional attachment as well as a sexual involvement. Such affairs are likely to lead to the breakdown of the marriage. A short-term extramarital affair is the opposite.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Marital Expectations                       OBJ:   6

 

  1. To have a healthy, intimate marriage, one needs to be a psychologically healthy person. Describe the characteristics of such a person.

 

ANS:

The person must be able to respect and genuinely like themselves, admit error and failure and start again, accept constructive criticism, and be self-supportive rather than self-destructive.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   The Self-Actualized Person in the Fully Functioning Family

OBJ:   7

 

  1. Describe a domestic partnership.

 

ANS:

A domestic partnership recognizes as valid some unmarried heterosexual and homosexual couples. In some cities, domestic partnership ordinances require that the couple publicly register and supply proof of their relationship.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   You and the State: Legal Aspects of Marriage

OBJ:   11