Radiation Protection in Medical Radiography 8th Edition by Sherer – Test Bank

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INSTANT DOWNLOAD COMPLETE TEST BANK WITH ANSWERS

 

Radiation Protection in Medical Radiography 8th Edition by Sherer – Test Bank

 

Sample  Questions

 

Chapter 03: Interaction of X-Radiation with Matter

Test Bank

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Particles associated with electromagnetic radiation that have no mass or electric charge are:
a. ions.
b. negatrons.
c. positrons.
d. x-ray photons.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   41

 

  1. Coherent scattering is most likely to occur ____________ even though some of this scattering occurs throughout the diagnostic range and may result in small amounts of radiographic fog.
a. below 10 keV
b. between 30 keV and 60 keV
c. between 60 keV and 90 keV
d. above 100 keV

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   47

 

  1. Which of the following is not a type of interaction between x-radiation and biologic matter?
a. Compton scattering
b. Bremsstrahlung
c. Pair production
d. Photoelectric absorption

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   46

 

  1. The symbol Z indicates:
a. atomic number of an atom.
b. atomic weight of an atom.
c. fluorescent yield.
d. the number of vacancies in an atomic shell.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   50

 

  1. In photoelectric absorption to dislodge an inner-shell electron from its atomic orbit, the incoming x-ray photon must be able to transfer a quantity of energy:
a. less than the energy that binds the atom together.
b. 10 times as great as the energy that binds the atom together.
c. as large as or larger than the amount of energy that binds the electron in its orbit.
d. equal to or greater than 1.022 MeV, regardless of the energy that binds the electron in its orbit.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   48

 

  1. Which of the following interactions between photons and matter involves a matter–antimatter annihilation reaction?
a. Compton scattering
b. Coherent scattering
c. Pair production
d. Photoelectric absorption

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   57

 

  1. The probability of occurrence of photoelectric absorption _________ as the energy of the incident photon decreases and the atomic number of the irradiated atoms _________.
a. increases markedly, decreases
b. decreases markedly, increases
c. increases markedly, increases
d. stays the same, increases

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   50

 

  1. Which of the following terms refers to the radiation that occurs when an electron drops down from an outer orbit to fill a vacancy in an inner orbit of the parent atom?
a. Characteristic radiation
b. Bremsstrahlung
c. Photoelectric radiation
d. Primary radiation

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   49

 

  1. Fluorescent radiation is also known as:
a. characteristic radiation.
b. coherent scattering.
c. Compton scattering.
d. unmodified scattering.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   49

 

  1. What is the effective atomic number of compact bone?
a. 5.9
b. 7.4
c. 7.6
d. 13.8

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   50

 

  1. Which of the following is not another term for coherent scattering?
a. Characteristic
b. Classical
c. Elastic
d. Unmodified

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   46

 

  1. Which of the following are by-products of photoelectric absorption?
a. Photoelectron and Compton scattered electron
b. Low-energy scattered x-ray photon and characteristic photon
c. Low-energy scattered x-ray photon and Compton scattered electron
d. Photoelectron and characteristic photon

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   50

 

  1. Which two interactions between x-radiation and matter may result in the production of small-angle scatter?
a. Photoelectric absorption and Compton scattering
b. Coherent scattering and Compton scattering
c. Photoelectric absorption and pair production
d. Coherent scattering and pair production

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   54

 

  1. Which of the following particles is considered to be a form of antimatter?
a. Electron
b. Positron
c. X-ray photon
d. Scattered x-ray photon

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   57

 

  1. Which of the following interactions results in the conversion of matter into energy?
a. Classical scattering
b. Photoelectric absorption
c. Modified scattering
d. Annihilation reaction

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   57

 

  1. Compton scattering is synonymous with:
a. coherent scattering.
b. incoherent scattering.
c. photoelectric absorption.
d. photodisintegration.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   54

 

  1. During the process of coherent scattering, the incident x-ray photon interacts with:
a. a single inner shell electron, ejecting it from its orbit.
b. a single outer shell electron, ejecting it from its orbit.
c. an atom transferring its energy by causing some or all of the electrons of the atom to vibrate momentarily and radiate energy in the form of electromagnetic waves.
d. a scattered photon of lesser energy, annihilating it.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   47

 

  1. What is the term for the number of x-rays emitted per inner-shell vacancy during the process of photoelectric absorption?
a. Characteristic absorption
b. Classical gain
c. Fluorescent yield
d. Modified pair production

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   49

 

  1. Which of the following results in all-directional scatter?
a. Classical interaction
b. Coherent interaction
c. Photoelectric interaction
d. Compton interaction

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   56

 

  1. Annihilation radiation is used in which of the following modalities?
a. Computed tomography (CT)
b. Digital mammography
c. Positron emission tomography (PET)
d. Computed radiography (CR)

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   57

 

  1. The x-ray photon energy required to initiate pair production is:
a. 0.511 keV.
b. 1.022 keV.
c. 0.511 MeV.
d. 1.022 MeV.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   57

 

  1. Differences in density level between radiographic images of adjacent structures as seen in a completed radiograph define:
a. image attenuation.
b. radiographic contrast.
c. radiographic density.
d. photodisintegration.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   53

 

  1. Radiographic density is:
a. caused by photodisintegration.
b. defined as the degree of overall blackening on a completed radiograph.
c. not affected by milliampere-seconds (mAs).
d. not relevant in the production of a diagnostic radiograph.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   52

 

  1. When a vacancy exists in an inner electron shell of an atom (as a result of photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, or bombardment by other electrons), the energy liberated when this vacancy is filled, instead of emerging from the atom as fluorescent radiation, can be transferred to another electron of the atom, thereby ejecting the electron. Such an emitted electron is called a(n):
a. Auger electron.
b. Compton electron.
c. Edison electron.
d. Sievert electron.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   49

 

  1. X-rays are carriers of:
a. disease.
b. electrons.
c. fluorescent properties that make them visible.
d. human-made, electromagnetic energy.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   40

Chapter 05: Radiation Monitoring

Test Bank

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. The metal filters contained in a film badge personnel dosimeter are generally composed of which of the following materials?
a. Aluminum or copper
b. Aluminum or lead
c. Zinc or copper
d. Lead or zinc

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   90

 

  1. What is the maximum period of time that a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) may be worn as a personnel dosimeter?
a. 1 hour
b. 1 week
c. 1 month
d. 3 months

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   95

 

  1. What do optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs), thermoluminescent dosimeters, film badge dosimeters, and pocket ionization chambers have in common?
a. These devices are all used for area monitoring.
b. These devices all use the same sensing material to detect ionizing radiation.
c. These devices are all used for personnel monitoring.
d. Each of these devices can only be used for personnel monitoring for a maximum of 6 months.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   85

 

  1. Which of the following instruments is called a cutie pie?
a. Geiger-Muller detector
b. Ionization chamber-type survey meter
c. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter
d. Proportional counter

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   101

 

  1. Which of the following instruments generally has a check source of a weak, long-lived radioisotope located on one side of its external surface to verify its constancy daily?
a. Pocket dosimeter
b. Proportional counter
c. Geiger-Muller detector
d. Ionization chamber-type survey meter

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   101

 

  1. Which of the following devices contains an aluminum oxide detector?
a. Film badge dosimeter
b. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter
c. Pocket ionization chamber
d. Thermoluminescent dosimeter

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   87

 

  1. When the sensing crystals contained in the thermoluminescent dosimeter are exposed to ionizing radiation, which of the following occurs?
a. The protons in the crystalline lattice structure of the LiF molecule absorb energy and are excited to a higher energy level or bands.
b. The neutrons in the crystalline lattice structure of the LiF molecule absorb energy and are excited to a higher energy level or bands.
c. Some of the electrons in the crystalline lattice structure of the LiF molecule absorb energy and are excited to higher energy levels or bands.
d. The electrons freed from the LiF molecule are trapped at a lower energy level or bands.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   95

 

  1. In diagnostic imaging, the ______________ of the optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter makes it ideal for monitoring employees working in low-radiation environments and for pregnant workers.
a. decreased sensitivity
b. increased sensitivity
c. lack of sensitivity
d. unaffected sensitivity

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   89

 

  1. The effective atomic number (Zeff) of lithium fluoride (LiF) is equal to:
a. 5.9.
b. 6.4.
c. 7.0.
d. 8.2.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   95

 

  1. Which of the following items is not a basic component of the film badge dosimeter?
a. Radiographic film packet
b. Durable plastic film holder
c. Charged electrodes
d. Assortment of metal filters

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   90

 

  1. Which of the following personnel dosimeters resembles an ordinary fountain pen externally?
a. Film badge dosimeter
b. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter
c. Pocket ionization chamber
d. Thermoluminescent dosimeter

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   96

 

  1. Of the following, which are disadvantages of using pocket ionization chambers as personnel dosimeters?
  2. Mechanical shock causes pocket chambers to discharge.
  3. A permanent legal record of personnel exposure cannot be obtained with a pocket dosimeter.
  4. False high readings may be obtained if the pocket dosimeter is not read each day.
a. 1 only
b. 2 only
c. 3 only
d. 1, 2, and 3

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   97

 

  1. Which component(s) of the Geiger-Muller detector alert(s) the operator to the presence of ionizing radiation?
a. The shield covering the probe’s sensitivity chamber
b. An audio amplifier and speaker
c. The metal that encloses the counter’s gas-filled tube
d. The meter scale

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   101

 

  1. Which of the following is not true about field survey instruments?
a. They are all equally sensitive in the detection of ionizing radiation.
b. They detect the presence of radiation and, when properly calibrated, give a reasonable accurate measure of the exposure.
c. They are durable enough to withstand normal use.
d. They are reliable.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   100

 

  1. Ionization chambers connected to electrometers are used by medical physicists to perform standard measurements required by state, federal, and health care accreditation organizations for radiographic and fluoroscopic devices. Some of these measurements include:
  2. x-ray output in mR/mAs.
  3. reproducibility and linearity of output.
  4. timer accuracy.
  5. half-value layer, or beam quality.
  6. entrance exposure rates for fluoroscopic units.
a. 1, 2, and 3 only
b. 1, 3, and 4 only
c. 2, 3, and 5 only
d. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   102

 

  1. Which of the following should be part of the employment record of all radiation workers?
a. A list of all fluoroscopic procedures performed daily
b. A list of all radiographic procedures performed daily
c. A record of exposure recorded by personnel dosimeters
d. A report of all procedures performed when “on call” after regular hours

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   86

 

  1. What should be given to a radiation worker on termination of employment?
a. A summary of an occupational exposure report
b. His or her personnel dosimeter
c. A pocket ionization chamber
d. An ionization chamber-type survey meter

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   94

 

  1. The front of the white paper packet of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter:
a. may be color coded to facilitate correct usage and placement of the badge on the body of occupationally exposed personnel.
b. must not have any type of printing on it.
c. must be radiopaque.
d. must never be exposed to ionizing radiation.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   88

 

  1. Three different filters are incorporated into the detector packet of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter. These filters are respectively made of:
  2. aluminum.
  3. copper.
  4. molybdenum.
  5. rhenium tungsten.
  6. tin.
a. 1, 2, and 3 only
b. 1, 2, and 4 only
c. 1, 2, and 5 only
d. 2, 4, and 5 only

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   87

 

  1. An electrometer is a device that measures:
a. current.
b. electrical charge.
c. potential difference.
d. voltage.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   96

 

  1. Of the following personnel monitoring devices, which device could be used to provide immediate exposure readout for a radiation worker working in a cardiac catheterization laboratory?
a. Film badge dosimeter
b. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter
c. Pocket ionization chamber
d. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   97

 

  1. Which of the following is a disadvantage of the optically stimulated dosimeter?
a. Exposure not determinable on the day of occurrence
b. Mechanical shock can cause false high reading
c. No permanent, legal record of exposure
d. Not cost-effective for large numbers of personnel

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   89

 

  1. Whenever the letter “M” appears under the current monitoring period or in the cumulative columns of a personnel monitoring report, it signifies that:
a. a mistake has been made in recording the equivalent dose.
b. an equivalent dose higher than the minimum measurable radiation quantity was recorded during that time.
c. an equivalent dose less than the minimum measurable radiation quantity was recorded during that time.
d. a maximal equivalent dose has been exceeded during that time.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   91

 

  1. The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter is “read out” by using:
a. a densitometer.
b. an ionization chamber.
c. a thermoluminescent analyzer.
d. laser light at selected frequencies.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   87

 

  1. Some of the advantages of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter are:
  2. can be used for up to 1 year.
  3. lightweight, durable, and easy to carry.
  4. integrated, self-contained, preloaded packet.
a. 1 and 2 only
b. 1 and 3 only
c. 2 and 3 only
d. 1, 2, and 3

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   89