Structure & Function Of the Body  13th Edition by Gary A. Thibodeau – Kevin T. Patton – Test Bank

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Structure & Function of the Body  13th Edition by Gary A. Thibodeau – Kevin T. Patton – Test Bank

 

Sample  Questions

 

 

Thibodeau and Patton: Structure & Function of the Body, 13th Edition

 

Test Bank

 

Chapter 6: The Skeletal System

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. The red bone marrow is important in the skeletal function of:
a. protection
b. support
c. hematopoiesis
d. storage

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Functions of the skeletal system

 

  1. Which of the following is not a function of the skeletal system?
a. movement
b. calcium storage
c. blood cell formation
d. all of the above are functions of the skeletal system

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Functions of the skeletal system

 

  1. The humerus is an example of:
a. a short bone
b. a long bone
c. a flat bone
d. an irregular bone

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Types of bones

 

  1. The wrist bone is an example of:
a. a short bone
b. a long bone
c. a flat bone
d. an irregular bone

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Types of bones

 

  1. The bones of the spine are examples of:
a. a short bone
b. a long bone

 

c. a flat bone
d. an irregular bone

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Types of bones

 

  1. The hollow shaft of a long bone is called the:
a. diaphysis
b. epiphyses
c. periosteum
d. endosteum

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. The thin fibrous membrane that lines the medullary cavity is called the:
a. diaphysis
b. epiphysis
c. periosteum
d. endosteum

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. The strong fibrous membrane covering the shaft of the long bone is called the:
a. diaphysis
b. epiphysis
c. periosteum
d. endosteum

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. The ends of long bones are called the:
a. diaphysis
b. epiphysis
c. periosteum
d. endosteum

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. Trabeculae are:
a. needlelike threads of spongy bone
b. the basic structure of cartilage
c. the basic structure of compact bone
d. the basic structure of bone marrow

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Another name for the Haversian system is:
a. central canal
b. lacunae
c. canaliculi
d. osteon

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The bone cells in the Haversian system are found in little spaces called:
a. central canal
b. canaliculi
c. lacunae
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Nutrients pass from the blood vessels to the bone cells by way of the:
a. central canal
b. canaliculi
c. lacunae
d. lamella

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The bone-forming cells are called:
a. osteoclasts
b. osteocytes
c. osteoblasts
d. chondrocytes

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 125

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. Cartilage cells are called:
a. osteoclasts
b. osteocytes
c. osteoblasts
d. chondrocytes

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 124

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The bone-resorbing cells are called:
a. osteoclasts
b. osteocytes
c. osteoblasts
d. chondrocytes

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 125

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. As long as this is present in a bone, bone growth can continue.
a. diaphysis
b. epiphyseal plate
c. epiphysis
d. osteoclasts

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 125

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. Which bone is not part of the axial skeleton?
a. ribs
b. vertebrae
c. carpal bone
d. sternum

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 126

TOP:    Appendicular skeleton—Upper extremity

 

  1. Which bone is not part of the appendicular skeleton?
a. humerus
b. ulna
c. tibia
d. hyoid bone

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 127

TOP:    Divisions of skeleton

 

  1. Which bone does not contain one of the paranasal sinuses?
a. mandible
b. maxillary
c. frontal
d. ethmoid

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 130

TOP:    Axial skeleton—Skull

 

  1. The upper jaw bone is called the:
a. zygomatic
b. maxilla
c. mandible
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 131

TOP:    Bones of the skull (Table 6-2)

 

  1. The cheekbone is called the:
a. zygomatic
b. maxilla
c. mandible
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 131

TOP:    Bones of the skull (Table 6-2)

 

  1. The bone at the back of the skull is called the:
a. temporal
b. parietal
c. sphenoid
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 131

TOP:    Bones of the skull (Table 6-2)

 

  1. The section of the vertebral column that contains the most vertebrae is the:
a. cervical section
b. thoracic section
c. lumbar section
d. sacrum section

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 134

TOP:    Bones of the vertebral column (Table 6-3)

 

  1. Ribs that attach individually to the sternum by way of the costal cartilage are:
a. true ribs
b. false ribs
c. floating ribs
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 135

TOP:    Thorax

 

  1. Ribs that do not attach to costal cartilage at all are:
a. true ribs
b. false ribs
c. floating ribs
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 135

TOP:    Thorax

 

  1. The two bones of the lower arm are the:
a. tibia and fibula
b. femur and humerus
c. ulna and radius
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 136

TOP:    Upper extremity

 

  1. The two bones of the lower leg are the:
a. tibia and fibula
b. femur and humerus
c. ulna and radius
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 139

TOP:    Lower extremity

 

  1. The phalanges are the bones of the:
a. fingers
b. wrists
c. toes
d. both A and C above

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 136 & 139

TOP:    Upper extremity and Lower extremity

 

  1. The metacarpals are the bones of the:
a. wrist
b. foot
c. ankle
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 136

TOP:    Upper extremity

 

  1. The tarsals are the bones of the:
a. wrist
b. foot
c. ankle
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 139

TOP:    Lower extremity

 

  1. The bone of the thigh is the:
a. ulna
b. radius
c. humerus
d. femur

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 139

TOP:    Lower extremity

 

  1. A suture is an example of a(n):
a. amphiarthritic joint
b. synarthrotic joint
c. diarthrotic joint
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 143

TOP:    Joints (articulations)

 

  1. The knee is an example of a(n):
a. amphiarthritic joint
b. synarthrotic joint
c. diarthrotic joint
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 143 & 144

TOP:    Joints (articulations)

 

  1. The elbow is an example of a(n):
a. amphiarthritic joint
b. synarthrotic joint
c. diarthrotic joint
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 143 & 144

TOP:    Joints (articulations)

 

  1. Which of the following is not a type of bone?
a. round
b. flat
c. long
d. short

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Types of bone

 

  1. In the adult skeleton, red bone marrow is found in the:
a. diaphysis
b. medullary canal
c. epiphysis
d. endosteum

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. Which of the following statements is true of both bone and cartilage?
a. They both contain more intercellular matrix than cells.
b. Both bone and cartilage cells are supplied with food and oxygen through canaliculi.
c. Both bone and cartilage cells are located in lacunae.
d. Both A and C are true.

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123-124

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Which of the following statements is not true of ribs?
a. All ribs attach to vertebrae.
b. All ribs attach to the sternum.
c. There are three pairs of false ribs.
d. All of the above are true of ribs.

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 135

TOP:    Thorax

 

  1. The total number of phalanges in the body is:
a. 14
b. 28
c. 56
d. 84

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 138 & 141

TOP:    Bones of the upper extremity (Table 6-5) and Bones of the lower extremity (Table 6-6)

 

  1. Which bone is not part of the coxal bone?
a. sacrum
b. pubis
c. ischium
d. ilium

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 141

TOP:    Bones of the lower extremity (Table 6-6)

 

  1. Moving from superficial to deep in a bone, the parts of the bone would be encountered in which sequence?
a. periosteum, endosteum, medullary cavity
b. endosteum, periosteum, medullary cavity
c. periosteum, medullary cavity, endosteum
d. endosteum, medullary cavity, periosteum

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. The lambdoidal suture is formed by the joining of the:
a. occipital bone and the temporal bones
b. temporal bones and the frontal bone
c. parietal bones and the occipital bone
d. parietal bones and the frontal bone

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 130

TOP:    Skull

 

  1. Going from superior to inferior, the regions of the spine would be in which order?
a. cervical, thoracic, sacrum, coccyx, lumbar
b. cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacrum, coccyx
c. cervical, lumbar, thoracic, coccyx, sacrum
d. cervical, thoracic, lumbar, coccyx, sacrum

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 133

TOP:    Spine (vertebral column)

 

  1. Straightening a bent elbow is:
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 148

TOP:    Types of joint movements (Table 6-7)

 

  1. Moving part of the body away from the midline of the body is:
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 149

TOP:    Types of joint movements (Table 6-7)

 

  1. Which of the following reduces the angle of a joint?
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 148

TOP:    Types of joint movements (Table 6-7)

 

  1. Moving the arm in a circle around the shoulder joint is:
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 149

TOP:    Types of joint movements (Table 6-7)

 

  1. Moving part of the body toward the midline of the body is:
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

 

ANS:   E                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 149

TOP:    Types of joint movements (Table 6-7)

 

  1. Bending the elbow is:
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 148

TOP:    Types of joint movements (Table 6-7)

 

  1. Which of the following increases the angle of a joint?
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 148

TOP:    Types of joint movements (Table 6-7)

 

  1. Which of the following spins one bone relative to another?
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 148

TOP:    Types of joint movements (Table 6-7)

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. The storage of calcium is an important function of the skeletal system.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Functions of the skeletal system

 

  1. The red bone marrow contributes to the support function of the skeletal system.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Functions of the skeletal system

 

  1. The carpals are an example of short bones.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Types of bones

 

  1. The vertebrae are examples of flat bones.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Types of bones

 

  1. The frontal bone of the skull is an example of an irregular bone.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Types of bones

 

  1. The diaphysis is the hollow shaft of the long bone.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. The articular cartilage covers and cushions the ends of the bones.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. The periosteum lines the medullary cavity.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. The epiphysis is the hollow area in the shaft of the bone where marrow is stored.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. The needlelike threads of spongy bone are called trabeculae.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The concentric rings surrounding the central canal of an osteon are called lamella.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Canaliculi are small canals that help supply the bone cells with food and oxygen.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The lacuna is a large canal in the center of the osteon that contains a blood vessel.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Chondrocytes are cartilage cells.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 124

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Osteoclasts are the bone-forming cells.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 125

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. Osteoblasts are the bone-resorbing cells.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 125

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. Most of the bones of the body begin as cartilage.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 124

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. As long as the epiphyseal plate remains between the diaphysis and epiphysis, bone growth can continue.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 125

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. The “soft spots” in a baby’s skull are referred to as fontanels.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 130

TOP:    Skull

 

  1. Osteoporosis is a weakening of the bone and occurs most often in women of childbearing age.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 127

TOP:    Health and well-being—Osteoporosis

 

  1. Vitamin C supplements are sometimes given to women to help prevent osteoporosis.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 127

TOP:    Health and well-being—Osteoporosis

 

  1. An improperly treated epiphyseal fracture can result in the affected limb being shorter than normal.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 130

TOP:    Clinical application—Epiphyseal fracture

 

  1. The bones of the middle ear are part of the axial skeleton.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 127

TOP:    Skull

 

  1. There are more bones in the axial skeleton than in the appendicular skeleton.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 130

TOP:    Main parts of the skeleton (Table 6-1)

 

  1. The occipital bone is the bone in the back of the skull.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 131

TOP:    Bones of the skull (Table 6-2)

 

  1. The maxilla is the bone of the lower jaw.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 131

TOP:    Bones of the skull (Table 6-2)

 

  1. The zygomatic bone is the cheekbone.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 131

TOP:    Bones of the skull (Table 6-2)

 

  1. Going from superior to inferior, the sequence of the vertebrae is cervical, thoracic, lumbar, coccyx, and sacrum.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 133

TOP:    Spine (vertebral column)

 

  1. The curves of the spine are important in supporting the weight of the rest of the body.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 133 & 134

TOP:    Spine (vertebral column)

 

  1. The ribs that individually attach to a costal cartilage and then to the sternum are called true ribs.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 135

TOP:    Thorax

 

  1. The last two sets of ribs that are only attached to the vertebrae are called false ribs.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 135

TOP:    Thorax

 

  1. The sternum is also called the breastbone.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 134

TOP:    Thorax

 

  1. The scapula and clavicle make up the pectoral girdle.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 135

TOP:    Upper extremity

 

  1. The tibia and fibula are the bones of the lower arm.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 136

TOP:    Upper extremity

 

  1. The femur is the bone of the thigh.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 139

TOP:    Lower extremity

 

  1. The phalanges are the bones of the fingers and toes.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 136-139

TOP:    Upper extremity and Lower extremity

 

  1. The tibia and fibula are bones of the lower leg.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 139

TOP:    Lower extremity

 

  1. The carpals are the bones of the hand.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 136

TOP:    Upper extremity

 

  1. The tarsals are the bones of the ankle.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 139 & 141

TOP:    Lower extremity and Bones of the lower extremity (Table 6-6)

 

  1. The patella is another term for the kneecap.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 139

TOP:    Lower extremity

 

  1. The olecranon process is another term for the elbow.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 138

TOP:    Bones of the upper extremity (Table 6-5)

 

  1. The metacarpals are the bones of the foot.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 136

TOP:    Upper extremity

 

  1. One of the main differences between the male skeleton and female skeleton is the shape of the pelvis.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 139

TOP:    Differences between a man’s and a woman’s skeleton

 

  1. A joint with only slight movement is called a diarthrotic joint.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 142

TOP:    Joints (articulations)

 

  1. A joint with no movement is called a synarthrotic joint.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 142

TOP:    Joints (articulations)

 

  1. A diarthrotic joint is a freely moving joint.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 142

TOP:    Joints (articulations)

 

  1. The sutures of the skull are synarthrotic joints.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 143

TOP:    Joints (articulations)

 

  1. The knee is an amphiarthrotic joint.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 143

TOP:    Joints (articulations)

 

  1. The hip is a diarthrotic joint.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 143 & 144

TOP:    Joints (articulations)

 

  1. A ligament is a band of connective tissue that holds two bones together.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 144

TOP:    Joints (articulations)

 

  1. The hinge joint provides the widest range of motion for the body.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 144

TOP:    Joints (articulations)

 

  1. To increase the angle of a joint is the definition of flexion.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 148

TOP:    Types of joint movements (Table 6-7)

 

  1. To increase the angle of a joint is the definition of extension.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 148

TOP:    Types of joint movements (Table 6-7)

 

  1. To move a part of the body away from the midline is called adduction.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 149

TOP:    Types of joint movements (Table 6-7)

 

  1. To move a part of the body toward the midline is called adduction.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 149

TOP:    Types of joint movements (Table 6-7)

 

  1. The word “articulation” is another word for joint.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 121

TOP:    Introduction

 

  1. The interaction between muscle and bone allows the body to move.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 122        TOP:    Movement

 

  1. The function of hematopoiesis is accomplished in the osteon of the bone.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Hemopoiesis

 

  1. In the adult skeleton, the function of hematopoiesis occurs in the medullary canal.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. Between the two diaphyses of a long bone is the epiphysis.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. The endosteum is more interior (deep) than the periosteum.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. Both bone and cartilage are examples of connective tissue.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The central canal of the osteon is also called the medullary cavity.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122-123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The terms osteon and Haversian system refer to the same structure.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Osteocytes can be found in the lacunae of the osteon.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Like bone cells, cartilage cells are located in lacunae.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 124

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Canaliculi supply food and oxygen to cartilage cells.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 124

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts do opposite functions in the bone.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 125

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. The skull is formed by endochondral ossification.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 125

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. When fontanels fuse, they form sutures.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 130

TOP:    Skull

 

  1. The spine has three curves; two convex and one concave.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 133

TOP:    Spine (vertebral column)

 

  1. Because the last two sets of ribs are not attached to any other bones in the body, they are called floating ribs.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 135

TOP:    Thorax

 

  1. Only the true ribs attach to the sternum by the costal cartilage.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 135        TOP:    Thorax

 

  1. The olecranon process of the humerus and the olecranon fossa of the ulna make up the structure of the elbow.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 138

TOP:    Bones of the upper extremity (Table 6-5)

 

  1. The indentation in the femur where the patella or kneecap fits is called the acetabulum.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 139

TOP:    Lower extremity

 

  1. Bones are the primary organ of the skeletal system.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 121

TOP:    Introduction

 

  1. Bones are the only major structure in the body that is not considered living.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 121

TOP:    Introduction

 

  1. The articular cartilage covers and protects the diaphysis of the long bones.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. The calcified rings of compact bone are called canaliculi.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The curves of the spine in the cervical and lumbar regions are the convex curves of the spine.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 133 & 134

TOP:    Spine (vertebral column)

 

  1. The head of the femur fits into a deep, cup-shaped socket in the coxal bone called the acetabulum.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 139

TOP:    Lower extremity

 

  1. The incus is a bone found in the skull.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 131

TOP:    Bones of the skull (Table 6-2)

 

MATCHING

 

Match each of the terms with the correct definition, description, or function.

a. diaphysis i. lacuna
b. epiphyses j. epiphyseal plate
c. periosteum k. diarthrotic
d. endosteum l. hematopoiesis
e. medullary cavity m. synarthrotic
f. osteoclast n. articulations
g. osteoblast o. amphiarthrotic
h. canaliculi

 

 

  1. _____ Bone-forming cells

 

  1. _____ Hollow shaft of the long bone

 

  1. _____ A bone can grow as long as this remains

 

  1. _____ Thin layer of connective tissue that lines the medullary canal

 

  1. _____ Small canals that carry nutrients to bone cells

 

  1. _____ Tough connective tissue surrounding the shaft of long bones

 

  1. _____ Hollow part of the bone where marrow is stored

 

  1. _____ Bone-resorbing cells

 

  1. _____ Small spaces in the bone matrix where bone cells are located

 

  1. _____ Ends of long bones

 

  1. _____ Type of joint that allows no movement

 

  1. _____ Refers to the process of blood cell formation

 

  1. _____ Type of joint that allows for free movement

 

  1. _____ Another term for joints

 

  1. _____ Type of joint that allows for slight, limited movement

 

  1. ANS:                     G         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 125

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. ANS:                     A         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. ANS:                     J           DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 125

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. ANS:                     D         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. ANS:                     H         DIF:                Memorization                          REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. ANS:                     C         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. ANS:                     E          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. ANS:                     F          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 125

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. ANS:                     I           DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. ANS:                     B         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. ANS:                     M         DIF:                Memorization                          REF:    Page: 142

TOP:    Kinds of joints

 

  1. ANS:                     L          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Functions of the skeletal system

 

  1. ANS:                     K         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 142

TOP:    Kinds of joints

 

  1. ANS:                     N         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 121

TOP:    Introduction

 

  1. ANS:                     O         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 142

TOP:    Kinds of joints

 

Match each bone with its description or location.

a. femur h. metatarsals
b. humerus i. patella
c. ulna j. ribs
d. fibula k. phalanges
e. zygomatic bone l. sternum
f. mandible m. stapes
g. carpals

 

 

  1. _____ Cheekbone

 

  1. _____ Bone of the thigh

 

  1. _____ Bones of the wrist

 

  1. _____ Can be true, false, or floating

 

  1. _____ One of the bones of the lower leg

 

  1. _____ Bone of the upper arm

 

  1. _____ Kneecap

 

  1. _____ One of the bones of the lower arm

 

  1. _____ Bone of the lower jaw

 

  1. _____ Bones of the foot

 

  1. _____ One of the bones of the middle ear

 

  1. _____ Bones of the fingers and toes

 

  1. _____ Breast bone to which the ribs attach

 

  1. ANS:                     E          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 131

TOP:    Bones of the skull (Table 6-2)

 

  1. ANS:                     A         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 141

TOP:    Bones of the lower extremity (Table 6-6)

 

  1. ANS:                     G         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 138

TOP:    Bones of the upper extremity (Table 6-5)

 

  1. ANS:                     J           DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 135

TOP:    Thorax

 

  1. ANS:                     D         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 141

TOP:    Bones of the lower extremity (Table 6-6)

 

  1. ANS:                     B         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 138

TOP:    Bones of the upper extremity (Table 6-5)

 

  1. ANS:                     I           DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 141

TOP:    Bones of the lower extremity (Table 6-6)

 

  1. ANS:                     C         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 138

TOP:    Bones of the upper extremity (Table 6-5)

 

  1. ANS:                     F          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 131

TOP:    Bones of the skull (Table 6-2)

 

  1. ANS:                     H         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 141

TOP:    Bones of the lower extremity (Table 6-6)

 

  1. ANS:                     M         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 131

TOP:    Bones of the skull (Table 6-2)

 

  1. ANS:                     K         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 138 & 141

TOP:    Bones of the upper extremity (Table 6-5) and Bones of the lower extremity (Table 6-6)

 

  1. ANS:                     L          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 134 & 135

TOP:    Thorax

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. Name and explain the five functions of the skeletal system.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Functions of the skeletal system

 

  1. Name the four types of bone described in the text and give an example of each.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122        TOP:    Types of bones

 

  1. List and briefly explain the structures of the long bone.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 122

TOP:    Structure of long bones

 

  1. Describe the structure of the osteon.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 123

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Bone heals well, yet cartilage does not heal well at all. Based on the microscopic structure of each, explain why this is the case.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Synthesis         REF:    Page: 123-124

TOP:    Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. What is osteoporosis? How can it be prevented or treated?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 127

TOP:    Health and well-being—Osteoporosis

 

  1. Explain the function of the following cells: osteoblast, osteoclasts, and epiphyseal plates.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 124-125

TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. A boy in his late teens who was 5 feet, 1 inch tall wanted to be given growth hormone. The doctor took x-rays of his skeleton and found that there were no epiphyseal plates in his long bones. What should he tell the boy about his request for growth hormone? Explain your answer.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Synthesis         REF:    Page: 125        TOP:    Bone formation and growth

 

  1. What important function explains the biggest difference between the male skeleton and female skeleton?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 139

TOP:    Differences between a man’s and a woman’s skeleton.

 

  1. Name the three types of joints in the body and give an example of each.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 142-144

TOP:    Joints (articulations)

 

  1. Pick a limb of the body, either an arm or leg, and name the bones in that limb

starting proximally and moving distally.

 

ANS:

Either: Humerus, ulna, radius, carpals, metacarpals, phalanges OR femur

tibia, fibula, tarsals, metatarsals, phalanges

 

DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 135, 136, & 139

TOP:    Upper extremity and Lower extremity

Thibodeau and Patton: Structure & Function of the Body, 13th Edition

 

Test Bank

 

Chapter 7: The Muscular System

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Striations are found in:
a. smooth muscle
b. skeletal muscle
c. cardiac muscle
d. both B and C

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 156        TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. Intercalated disks are found in:
a. smooth muscle
b. skeletal muscle
c. cardiac muscle
d. voluntary muscle

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. Another name for smooth muscle is:
a. cardiac muscle
b. visceral muscle
c. voluntary muscle
d. skeletal muscle

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. Another name for skeletal muscle is:
a. cardiac muscle
b. visceral muscle
c. voluntary muscle
d. involuntary muscle

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. The muscle attachment to the more movable bone is called the:
a. origin
b. insertion
c. tendon

 

d. bursae

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. The muscle attachment to the more stationary bone is called the:
a. origin
b. insertion
c. tendon
d. bursae

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. The connective tissue that attaches muscle to bone is called:
a. origin
b. insertion
c. tendon
d. bursae

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. A fluid-filled sac that acts as a lubricating structure for muscle movement is a(n):
a. origin
b. insertion
c. tendon
d. bursae

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. If an injury caused damage to the insertion of the biceps brachii muscle (the anterior muscle of the upper arm), the injury would be nearest:
a. the shoulder
b. the middle of the upper arm
c. the elbow
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Synthesis        REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. The thin myofilament of the skeletal muscles is made of:
a. sarcomere
b. actin
c. myosin
d. Z-lines

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. The thick myofilament of the skeletal muscles is made of:
a. sarcomere
b. actin
c. myosin
d. Z-lines

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. The basic contractile unit of a skeletal muscle is the:
a. sarcomere
b. actin
c. myosin
d. Z-lines

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. When a muscle contraction occurs:
a. the actin gets shorter
b. the myosin gets shorter
c. the Z-lines are pulled closer together
d. both A and B

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Synthesis        REF:    Page: 157 & 159

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. According to the sliding filament model, in order for a sarcomere to contract:
a. bridges must form between the actin and myosin
b. calcium must be released from the endoplasmic reticulum
c. ATP must be broken down for energy
d. all of the above

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157 & 159

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. To produce smooth movement at a joint:
a. the prime mover and antagonists must contract
b. the antagonist and synergists must contract
c. the prime mover and synergists must contract
d. both A and B above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 159

TOP:    Movement

 

  1. Tonic contractions:
a. move a muscle through a full range of motion
b. do not shorten the muscle
c. are important in maintaining posture
d. both B and C above

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 160

TOP:    Posture

 

  1. The point of contact between the nerve and the muscle fibers it stimulates is called a:
a. motor unit
b. neuromuscular junction
c. motor neuron
d. neurotransmitter

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 161

TOP:    Motor unit

 

  1. A single motor neuron with all the muscle cells it innervates is called a:
a. motor unit
b. neuromuscular junction
c. neurotransmitter
d. both B and C above

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 161

TOP:    Motor unit

 

  1. The minimal level of stimulation required to cause a fiber to contract is called:
a. a threshold stimulus
b. the all-or-none law
c. twitch contraction
d. tetanic contraction

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Muscle stimulus

 

  1. When a muscle fiber is subjected to a stimulus, it contracts completely. This is called:
a. threshold stimulus
b. the all-or-none-law
c. twitch contraction
d. tetanic contraction

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Muscle stimulus

 

  1. What allows you to lift different weights with the same muscle is the:
a. difference in the threshold stimulus
b. number of motor units used by the muscle
c. all-or-none law
d. isometric contraction of the muscle fibers

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 162        TOP:    Muscle stimulus

 

  1. The muscle contracts and shortens and the insertion end moves toward the point of origin. This sentence describes:
a. twitch contractions
b. tetanic contractions
c. isotonic contractions
d. isometric contractions

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Isotonic contraction

 

  1. The muscle contracts but does not shorten, even though an increase in muscle tension does occur. This sentence describes:
a. twitch contractions
b. tetanic contractions
c. isotonic contractions
d. isometric contractions

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Isometric contraction

 

  1. Strength training leads to:
a. an increased number of myofilaments
b. an increased number of muscle fibers
c. muscle atrophy
d. both A and B above

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 164

TOP:    Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Endurance training leads to:
a. an increased number of myofilaments
b. an increased number of muscle fibers
c. an increased number of blood vessels to the muscle
d. muscle atrophy

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 164

TOP:    Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Which of the following muscles is not a muscle of the head and neck?
a. frontal
b. masseter
c. latissimus dorsi
d. zygomaticus

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 165

TOP:    Muscles of the head and neck

 

  1. Which of the following muscles is not a muscle that moves the upper extremities?
a. biceps brachii
b. triceps brachii
c. latissimus dorsi
d. rectus abdominis

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 165

TOP:    Muscles that move the upper extremities

 

  1. Which of the following muscles is not a muscle of the trunk?
a. rectus abdominis
b. iliopsoas
c. internal oblique
d. external oblique

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 170

TOP:    Muscles of the trunk

 

  1. Which of the following muscles is not a muscle that moves the lower extremities?
a. sartorius
b. trapezius
c. iliopsoas
d. gracilis

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 170 & 171

TOP:    Muscles that move the lower extremities

 

  1. The term that refers to ankle and foot movement is:
a. supination
b. pronation
c. dorsiflexion
d. both A and B above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 173 & 175

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. The movement that is opposite dorsiflexion is:
a. supination
b. pronation
c. rotation
d. plantar flexion

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 173 & 175

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. Movement around a longitudinal axis is:
a. supination
b. rotation
c. dorsiflexion
d. pronation

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 173

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. Moving a part of the body away from the midline of the body is called:
a. adduction
b. abduction
c. rotation
d. pronation

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 173

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. Moving a part of the body toward the midline of the body is called:
a. adduction
b. abduction
c. rotation
d. pronation

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 173

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. The hand position when the body is in anatomical position is:
a. dorsiflexion
b. pronation
c. supination
d. plantar flexion

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 173

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. The opposite movement of rotation is:
a. flexion
b. abduction
c. pronation
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 173

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. A bursae is a saclike structure that is filled with:
a. blood
b. synovial fluid
c. blood plasma
d. lymph

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. If a prime mover flexes a joint:
a. the synergist will extend the joint
b. the synergist and antagonist will extend the joint
c. the antagonist will extend the joint
d. the antagonist will assist in flexing the joint

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Synthesis        REF:    Page: 159        TOP:    Movement

 

  1. What part of the body does the pectoralis major move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 165

TOP:    Muscles that move the upper extremities

 

  1. What part of the body does the external oblique move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 170

TOP:    Muscles of the trunk

 

  1. What part of the body does the masseter move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 165

TOP:    Muscles of the head and neck

 

  1. What part of the body does the sartorius move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 171

TOP:    Muscles that move the lower extremities

 

  1. What part of the body does the zygomaticus move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 165

TOP:    Muscles of the head and neck

 

  1. What part of the body does the sternocleidomastoid move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 165

TOP:    Muscles of the head and neck

 

  1. What part of the body does the deltoid move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 165

TOP:    Muscles that move the upper extremities

 

  1. What part of the body does the biceps femoris move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 171

TOP:    Muscles that move the lower extremities

 

  1. What part of the body does the rectus abdominis move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 170

TOP:    Muscles of the trunk

 

  1. What part of the body does the gastrocnemius move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 171

TOP:    Muscles that move the lower extremities

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. Skeletal muscle is also called striated muscle.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. Smooth muscle is also called voluntary muscle.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. Cardiac muscle is found in the heart.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. Like skeletal muscles, cardiac muscles have striations.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. Like skeletal muscles, cardiac muscles have intercalated disks.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. Involuntary muscles are also called visceral muscles.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. Tendons anchor muscles to bones.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. The insertion of a muscle is on the more stationary bone.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. The origin of a muscle is on the more movable bone.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. The origin of a muscle is on the more stationary bone.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. Bursae are small fluid-filled sacs that lie between some tendons and bones.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. The thin myofilament in a muscle fiber is made of actin.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. The thick myofilament in a muscle fiber is made of actin.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. The basic contractile unit of a muscle is called a sarcomere.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. Z-lines mark the ends of individual sarcomeres.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. In order for the necessary bridges to form, potassium must be released from the endoplasmic reticulum.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 159

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. In the sliding filament model of muscle contraction, bridges are formed between the myosin and actin.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 159

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. Energy for muscle contraction is provided when ATP is broken down.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 159

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. In order for movement to take place, when the prime mover contracts, the synergist must relax.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 159

TOP:    Movement

 

  1. In order for movement to take place, the antagonists must do the opposite of the prime mover.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 159        TOP:    Movement

 

  1. Tonic contractions provide rapid movement for skeletal muscles.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 160

TOP:    Posture

 

  1. Good posture can be defined as holding the body parts in the position that favors best function.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 160

TOP:    Posture

 

  1. The production of heat is a primary function of the muscular system.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 160

TOP:    Heat production

 

  1. Hypothermia refers to a dangerous elevation in body temperature.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 160

TOP:    Heat production

 

  1. The breakdown of ATP is the energy source that helps supply heat to the body.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 160

TOP:    Heat production

 

  1. During strenuous exercise, the muscles’ use of oxygen and nutrients can outstrip the blood’s ability to supply them.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 160

TOP:    Fatigue

 

  1. When muscles must use energy release that does not require oxygen, the waste product ascorbic acid is produced, which can cause soreness in the muscle.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 160

TOP:    Fatigue

 

  1. The term oxygen debt describes the continued increased metabolism that must occur in a cell to remove the excess acid that accumulates during prolonged exercise.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 160

TOP:    Fatigue

 

  1. The respiratory and nervous systems, in addition to the muscular system, play important roles in body movement.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 160 & 161

TOP:    Role of other body systems in movement

 

  1. A motor neuron and all the muscle cells it stimulates are called a neuromuscular junction.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 161

TOP:    Motor unit

 

  1. A motor neuron and all the muscle cells it stimulates are called a motor unit.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 161

TOP:    Motor unit

 

  1. The point of contact between the nerve and muscle is called a motor unit.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 161

TOP:    Motor unit

 

  1. The minimum level of stimulation required to cause a muscle fiber to contract is called the threshold stimulus.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Muscle stimulus

 

  1. When a muscle fiber is exposed to a greater-than-threshold stimulus, it contracts completely. This is called an all-or-none response.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Muscle stimulus

 

  1. All motor units in a given muscle have the same threshold stimulus.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Synthesis        REF:    Page: 162        TOP:    Muscle stimulus

 

  1. The lifting of a 10-lb weight requires the activation of fewer motor units than the lifting of a 5-lb weight.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 162        TOP:    Muscle stimulus

 

  1. Twitch contractions play an important role in normal muscle activity.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Twitch and titanic contractions

 

  1. Lifting your textbook off the desk is an example of an isotonic muscle contraction.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Isotonic contraction

 

  1. Trying to lift a car (and failing) is an example of an isotonic muscle contraction.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Isometric contraction

 

  1. In an isometric contraction, no movement occurs but the muscle tension increases.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 164

TOP:    Isometric contraction

 

  1. Prolonged inactivity in a muscle can result in disuse hypertrophy.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 164

TOP:    Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Strength training results in an increase in the number of muscle fibers.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 164

TOP:    Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Strength training results in an increase in the number of myofilaments in each muscle fiber.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 164

TOP:    Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Endurance training causes muscle hypertrophy.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 164

TOP:    Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Endurance training increases the blood flow to a muscle.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 164 & 165

TOP:    Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Tenosynovitis in the wrist can cause carpal tunnel syndrome.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 164

TOP:    Clinical application—Carpal tunnel syndrome

 

  1. The contraction of the biceps brachii muscle causes flexion of the elbow joint.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 172

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contraction

 

  1. Dorsiflexion allows you to stand on your toes.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 173 & 175

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contraction

 

  1. Raising your arm laterally away from your body is an example of adduction.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 173

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contraction

 

  1. In the anatomical position, the hands are supinated.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 173

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contraction

 

  1. Movement of your hand from a supinated to pronated position requires rotation of the forearm.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 173

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contraction

 

  1. Most anabolic steroids are made of synthetic testosterone.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 171

TOP:    Research, issues, and trends—Enhancing muscle strength

 

  1. Research has shown that anabolic steroids do not increase muscle size and strength.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 171

TOP:    Research, issues, and trends—Enhancing muscle strength

 

  1. Research has shown that prolonged use of anabolic steroids can have severe, even life-threatening, consequences.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 171

TOP:    Research, issues, and trends—Enhancing muscle strength

 

  1. The overuse of vitamins can cause a serious health problem called hypervitaminosis.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 171

TOP:    Research, issues, and trends—Enhancing muscle strength

 

  1. Skeletal muscle cells contain more than one nucleus.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. All muscles specialize in contraction or shortening.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. Bursae and tendon sheaths have the same function.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. The pull of gravity assists the muscles in maintaining body posture.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 160

TOP:    Posture

 

  1. When stimulated, the entire muscle follows the all-or-none law.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Muscle stimulus

 

  1. Both tonic and isotonic contractions cause movement of a joint.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Isotonic contraction

 

  1. Another name for aerobic training is strength training.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 164 & 165

TOP:    Effects of exercise on skeletal muscle

 

MATCHING

 

Match each of the terms with its definition or explanation.

a. skeletal muscle f. myosin
b. smooth muscle g. motor unit
c. origin h. neuromuscular junction
d. insertion i. isotonic
e. actin j. isometric

 

 

  1. _____ Protein that makes the thin myofilament

 

  1. _____ Another name for voluntary muscle

 

  1. _____ Type of muscle contraction in which the muscle shortens and the joint moves

 

  1. _____ Point of contact between the nerve ending and the muscle fiber

 

  1. _____ Attachment point to the bone that moves during muscle contraction

 

  1. _____ Another name for visceral muscle

 

  1. _____ Protein that makes up the thick myofilament

 

  1. _____ Attachment point to the bone that is stationary during contraction

 

  1. _____ Muscle contraction in which the muscle tenses but does not shorten

 

  1. _____ Single motor neuron with all the muscle cells it innervates

 

  1. ANS:                     E          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. ANS:                     A         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. ANS:                     I           DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Isotonic contractions

 

  1. ANS:                     H         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 161

TOP:    Motor unit

 

  1. ANS:                     D         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. ANS:                     B         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 156

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. ANS:                     F          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. ANS:                     C         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. ANS:                     J           DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Isometric contraction

 

  1. ANS:                     G         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 161

TOP:    Motor unit

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. Name and give the location of the three types of muscle tissue.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 156 & 157

TOP:    Muscle tissue

 

  1. Differentiate between the origin and insertion of a muscle.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 157

TOP:    Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. Using the sliding filament model of muscle contraction, explain fully how a muscle contracts.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Synthesis         REF:    Page: 157 & 159

TOP:    Microscopic structure

 

  1. In the flexion of the elbow, which muscle group functions as the prime mover, a synergist, and an antagonist?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 159        TOP:    Movement

 

  1. Explain how a muscle becomes fatigued. What is the oxygen debt and how is it repaid?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Synthesis         REF:    Page: 160        TOP:    Fatigue

 

  1. What is the all-or-none response? If the all-or-none response occurs in muscle cells, explain what occurs differently in a muscle when you lift a 5-lb weight and a 50-lb weight.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Synthesis         REF:    Page: 161 & 162

TOP:    Muscle stimulus/Motor unit

 

  1. Explain the difference between an isotonic and isometric muscle contraction.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 162

TOP:    Isotonic contraction and Isometric contraction

 

  1. For what type of sport would endurance training be best? For what type of sport would strength training be best? Explain your answers.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 164 & 165

TOP:    Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Explain carpal tunnel syndrome. What is a possible cure?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 164

TOP:    Clinical application—Carpal tunnel syndrome

 

  1. Describe a movement that would be an example of each of the following: flexion, extension, abduction, rotation, and plantar flexion.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 172-175

TOP:    Movements produced by skeletal muscle contraction

Thibodeau and Patton: Structure & Function of the Body, 13th Edition

 

Test Bank

 

Chapter 11: Blood

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Plasma:
a. consists of blood without the blood cells and clotting factors
b. carries almost all of the food to the cells
c. carries almost all of the oxygen to the cells
d. all of the above

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Plasma contains:
a. digested food
b. metabolic waste products
c. proteins
d. all of the above

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Serum:
a. is made from blood plasma
b. contains fibrinogen
c. has no antibodies
d. all of the above

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. The function of albumin is to:
a. assist in the formation of a blood clot
b. thicken the blood
c. act as an enzyme for the breakdown of carbonic acid
d. assist in the fighting of infection

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Globulins:
a. assist in the formation of a blood clot
b. thicken the blood

 

c. assist in fighting infection
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. The approximate number of red blood cells in a cubic millimeter of blood is:
a. 50,000
b. 500,000
c. 5,000,000
d. 50,000,000

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. The approximate number of white blood cells in a cubic millimeter of blood is:
a. 7,500
b. 75,000
c. 750,000
d. 7,500,000

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. The approximate number of platelets in a cubic millimeter of blood is:
a. 30,000
b. 300,000
c. 3,000,000
d. 30,000,000

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Myeloid tissue is:
a. also called lymphoid tissue
b. also called red bone marrow
c. important in the formation of blood cells
d. both B and C above

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Red bone marrow is found in greatest amounts in the:
a. sternum and hipbone
b. clavicle and vertebrae
c. femur and tibia
d. humerus and ulna

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. The blood cells with the longest circulating life span are the:
a. red blood cells
b. granular white blood cells
c. nongranular white blood cells
d. both B and C have equal life spans

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. The red blood cell:
a. has no nucleus
b. is spherical in shape to increase its surface area
c. is important in carrying metabolic waste to the kidney
d. all of the above

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Red blood cells

 

  1. The red blood cell:
a. assists in transporting carbon dioxide to the lungs
b. contains hemoglobin to carry oxygen
c. has a unique shape to increase its surface area
d. all of the above

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Red blood cells

 

  1. Polycythemia can be caused by:
a. too few red blood cells
b. too little hemoglobin in the blood cells
c. too many red blood cells being made
d. both A and B above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 286

TOP:    Anemia

 

  1. Anemia can be caused by:
a. too few red blood cells
b. too little hemoglobin in the blood cells
c. too many red blood cells being made
d. both A and B above

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 285 & 286

TOP:    Anemia

 

  1. Pernicious anemia is caused by:
a. severe hemorrhage
b. lack of vitamin B12
c. an insufficient amount of iron in the diet
d. radiation or chemical damage to bone marrow

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 285

TOP:    Anemia

 

  1. Which of the following describes the layering, in order from top to bottom, of a test tube of blood that has been “spun down” in a centrifuge?
a. plasma, red blood cells, buffy coat
b. buffy coat, plasma, red blood cells
c. plasma, buffy coat, red blood cells
d. red blood cells, buffy coat, plasma

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 286 & 287

TOP:    Hematocrit test

 

  1. The blood component with the highest density is:
a. white blood cells
b. red blood cells
c. plasma
d. serum

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 286 & 287

TOP:    Hematocrit test

 

  1. Which white blood cells are phagocytes?
a. monocytes
b. T lymphocytes
c. B lymphocytes
d. all of the above

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. Which white blood cells produce antibodies?
a. monocytes
b. T lymphocytes
c. B lymphocytes
d. neutrophils

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. Which white blood cells directly attack microbes?
a. eosinophils
b. T lymphocytes
c. B lymphocytes
d. basophils

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. Which white blood cells help protect the body from parasites?
a. eosinophils
b. monocytes
c. neutrophils
d. basophils

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. Which white blood cells secrete heparin?
a. eosinophils
b. monocytes
c. neutrophils
d. basophils

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. Leukopenia:
a. refers to an excess of white blood cells
b. is characteristic of people with leukemia
c. is characteristic of people with AIDS
d. both A and B above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    WBC count

 

  1. Injury to a blood vessel or damage to a platelet can cause the formation of:
a. fibrinogen
b. fibrin
c. prothrombin activator
d. thrombin

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. In order for thrombin to be formed:
a. fibrinogen must be present
b. sodium must be present
c. potassium must be present
d. calcium must be present

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. At the point of injury, platelets:
a. become sticky and accumulate near the opening
b. release thrombin
c. release fibrin
d. both A and C above

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. In the final step in the blood clotting process:
a. prothrombin reacts with fibrin to form fibrinogen
b. thrombin reacts with fibrinogen to form fibrin
c. prothrombin reacts with fibrin to form fibrinogen
d. prothrombin activator reacts with prothrombin to form thrombin

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. Vitamin K stimulates the liver to increase production of:
a. prothrombin activator
b. fibrinogen
c. prothrombin
d. thrombin

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 291

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. A thrombus is:
a. a clot that stays where it was formed
b. the same as an embolus
c. usually made of thrombin
d. a blood clot circulating in the bloodstream

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 291

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. The blood type that has antigen A on the cell and anti-B antibody in the plasma is:
a. type O
b. type AB
c. type A
d. type B

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 291        TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. The blood type with no antigens on the blood cell and both anti-A and anti-B antibodies in the plasma is:
a. type AB
b. type O
c. type A
d. type B

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 292        TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. The “universal donor” blood type is:
a. type A
b. type B
c. type AB
d. type O

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 293

TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. The “universal recipient” blood type is:
a. type A
b. type B
c. type AB
d. type O

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 293

TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. Erythroblastosis fetalis:
a. usually occurs in a mother’s first-born baby
b. occurs in the case of an Rh-positive mother and an Rh-negative baby
c. occurs in the case of an Rh-positive baby and an Rh-negative mother
d. both A and B above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 294

TOP:    Erythroblastosis fetalis

 

  1. The most abundant type of solute in the blood plasma is:
a. sodium
b. red blood cells
c. plasma proteins
d. potassium

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. A substance found in plasma but not in serum is:
a. fibrinogen
b. antibodies
c. formed elements
d. both A and B above

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 282        TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Another term for red blood cells is:
a. leukocytes
b. eosinophils
c. thrombocytes
d. erythrocytes

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Another term for white blood cells is:
a. thrombocytes
b. leukocytes
c. erythrocytes
d. albumin

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Another term for platelets is:
a. erythrocytes
b. leukocytes
c. thrombocytes
d. fibrinogen

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Which of the following is not a granular leukocyte?
a. monocyte
b. neutrophil
c. basophil
d. eosinophil

 

 

ANS:   A                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Basophils and lymphocytes have this characteristic in common:
a. both are thrombocytes
b. both are leukocytes
c. both are granular leukocytes
d. both B and C above

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Eosinophils and neutrophils have this characteristic in common:
a. both are thrombocytes
b. both are leukocytes
c. both are granular leukocytes
d. both B and C above

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. A patient with a thicker-than-normal buffy coat may have:
a. an infection
b. leukemia
c. leukopenia
d. both A and B above

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 286-287

TOP:    Hematocrit test

 

  1. A patient with a thinner-than-normal buffy coat many have:
a. an infection
b. leukemia
c. leukopenia
d. both A and B above

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 286 & 287

TOP:    Hematocrit test

 

  1. A couple would have to worry about their next child having erythroblastosis fetalis if:
a. both parents are Rh negative
b. both parents are Rh positive
c. their first child was Rh negative
d. none of the above situations would cause a child to have erythroblastosis fetalis

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 292-293

TOP:    Rh system

 

  1. Blood usually accounts for about
a. 3% to 5% of body weight
b. 7% to 9% of body weight
c. 10% to 12% of body weight
d. 14% to 18% of body weight

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Lymphatic tissue forms
a. all types of white blood cells
b. only lymphocytes
c. both lymphocytes and monocytes
d. lymphatic tissue does not form blood cells

 

 

ANS:   C                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Aplastic anemia can be caused by
a. severe hemorrhage
b. damage to blood forming elements in the bone marrow
c. a lack of vitamin B12
d. an inherited condition resulting in the formation of abnormal hemoglobin

 

 

ANS:   B                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 285

TOP:    Anemia

 

  1. Sickle-cell anemia can be caused by
a. severe hemorrhage
b. damage to blood forming elements in the bone marrow
c. a lack of vitamin B12
d. an inherited condition resulting in the formation of abnormal hemoglobin

 

 

ANS:   D                     DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 285

TOP:    Anemia

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. Plasma is made up mostly of water.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. The globulins in the plasma are important in blood clot formation.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Fibrinogens in the plasma help the body fight infection.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Albumins in the plasma help thicken the blood.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Serum can be given to surgical patients to help their blood clot more readily.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Synthesis        REF:    Page: 282        TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Serum can be given to patients in need of a specific antibody.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 282        TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Both myeloid tissue and lymphatic tissue are important in hematopoiesis.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 284        TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Red bone marrow makes only red blood cells.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Lymphatic tissue is also called red bone marrow.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Myeloid tissue is also called red bone marrow.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Red bone marrow is chiefly found in the vertebrae and clavicle.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Red bone marrow is chiefly found in the sternum, hip-bone, and ribs.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Lymphatic tissue forms monocytes.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Lymphatic tissue is located in the spleen, thymus, and lymph nodes.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Red blood cells circulate for up to 4 months.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. When the red blood cells break apart, their components are removed from the blood by the kidneys.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Granular leukocytes may have a circulating lifespan of up to 6 months.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Nongranular leukocytes have a circulating lifespan of just a few days.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. The shape of the red blood cell helps reduce its surface area.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Red blood cells

 

  1. The red blood cells have no nucleus.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Red blood cells

 

  1. Hemoglobin can carry oxygen.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284 & 285

TOP:    Red blood cells

 

  1. Hemoglobin can carry carbon dioxide.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 285

TOP:    Red blood cells

 

  1. Oxyhemoglobin carries oxygen from the cells to the lungs.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Synthesis        REF:    Page: 284        TOP:    Red blood cells

 

  1. Pernicious anemia results from a lack of iron in the blood.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 285

TOP:    Anemia

 

  1. The loss of a large amount of blood can result in anemia.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 285

TOP:    Anemia

 

  1. Polycythemia can result from too little hemoglobin even if there is an adequate number of red blood cells.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 286

TOP:    Anemia

 

  1. Normally, about 55% of the blood volume is red blood cells.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 286

TOP:    Hematocrit test

 

  1. If a test tube of blood is “spun down” in a centrifuge, the white blood cells and platelets form a layer called the buffy coat.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 286 & 287

TOP:    Hematocrit test

 

  1. A person with polycythemia would have a red blood cell volume less than 45%.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 285 & 287

TOP:    Anemia/Hematocrit test

 

  1. A person with anemia might have a red blood cell volume as high as 65%.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 285        TOP:    Anemia

 

  1. Both monocytes and neutrophils can be called phagocytes.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    Leukocyte types and functions

 

  1. The production of antibodies by T lymphocytes is an important part of the immune system.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    Leukocyte types and functions

 

  1. Eosinophils release important chemicals, such as heparin, that prevent blood clots.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    Leukocyte types and functions

 

  1. Prothrombin activator plus the normal amount of blood sodium converts prothrombin into thrombin.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. Thrombin reacts with fibrinogen in the plasma to form fibrin.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. At the site of an injury, platelets become sticky and form a platelet plug.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. Vitamin K stimulates the liver to produce more fibrinogen, which helps the blood clot more efficiently.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 291

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. A thrombus is a clot that stays in the place where it was formed.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 291

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. An embolus is part of a clot that has become dislodged and circulates through the bloodstream.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 291

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. If a patient were having a heart attack caused by a blood clot, heparin would be an effective treatment in dissolving the clot.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Synthesis        REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    Clinical application—Anticoagulant therapy

 

  1. If a patient were having a heart attack caused by a blood clot, streptokinase would be an effective treatment in dissolving the clot.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Synthesis        REF:    Page: 291

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. A person with B antigens on the red blood cell and anti-A antibodies in the plasma would have type A blood.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 291        TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. A person with both A and B antigens on the red blood cell and no antibodies in the plasma would have type AB blood.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 292        TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. A person with both A and B antigens on the red blood cell and no antibodies in the plasma would have type O blood.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 292        TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. A person with no antigens on the red blood cell and both anti-A and anti-B antibodies in the plasma would be considered a universal recipient.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Synthesis        REF:    Page: 293        TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. A person with no antigens on the red blood cell and both anti-A and anti-B antibodies in the plasma would be considered a universal donor.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Synthesis        REF:    Page: 293        TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. The Rh factor is found in the plasma of the blood.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 293

TOP:    Rh system

 

  1. Erythroblastosis fetalis cannot occur if the mother is Rh-positive.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 293 & 294

TOP:    Erythroblastosis fetalis

 

  1. Erythroblastosis fetalis cannot occur if the father is Rh-negative.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Synthesis        REF:    Page: 293 & 294

TOP:    Erythroblastosis fetalis

 

  1. RhoGAM can be used to treat newborn babies to prevent erythroblastosis fetalis.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 294

TOP:    Erythroblastosis fetalis

 

  1. Plasma can also be called the extracellular part of the blood.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 281

TOP:    Blood composition

 

  1. Serum consists of blood minus the formed elements whereas plasma consists of blood minus the formed elements and clotting factors.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 282        TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Blood makes up about 10% to 15% of the body weight in an adult.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Most adults have between 4 and 6 liters of blood.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. A neutrophil is a type of granular erythrocyte.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. A monocyte is a nongranular leukocyte.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Both lymphocytes and monocytes are nongranular leukocytes.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. The mature red blood cell contains fewer chromosomes than other cells in the body.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Synthesis        REF:    Page: 284        TOP:    Red blood cells

 

  1. Anemia refers to an inadequate number of red blood cells.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 285

TOP:    Anemia

 

  1. Pernicious, iron deficiency, and polycythemia are all examples of types of anemias.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 284 & 285

TOP:    Anemia

 

  1. A possible cause of leukopenia is the malignant disease leukemia.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 287 & 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. An infection causes leukocytosis.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. Most people in the United States are Rh positive.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 293

TOP:    Rh system

 

  1. An important function of the circulatory system is protection.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 281

TOP:    Introduction

 

  1. An important function of the lymphatic system is protection.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 281

TOP:    Introduction

 

  1. Whole blood without the clotting factors is called serum.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. In whole blood, the volume of plasma is larger than the volume of the formed elements.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 283        TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. Although there are several types of white blood cells, there is only one type of red blood cell.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 283        TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. Hematocrit values tend to be higher in men than women and higher in older people than in younger people.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 287

TOP:    Hematocrit test

 

  1. Dehydration would cause a temporary drop in hematocrit values.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 287

TOP:    Hematocrit test

 

  1. A differential white blood cell count gives the proportions of each type of white blood cell in the blood.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 287 & 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. Eosinophils help protect against infections caused by certain parasites.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. Basophils secrete the chemical histamine during inflammatory reactions.

 

ANS:   T                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. Macrophages are specialized neutrophils that increase their size after migrating out of the bloodstream.

 

ANS:   F                      DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    Leukocyte types and functions

 

MATCHING

 

Match each term with its definition or description.

a. plasma f. myeloid tissue
b. serum g. hemoglobin
c. red blood cell h. fibrinogen
d. monocyte i. universal donor
e. eosinophil j. universal recipient

 

 

  1. _____ Blood cells that carry oxygen

 

  1. _____ Another term for red bone marrow

 

  1. _____ Liquid part of the blood including the clotting factors

 

  1. _____ A plasma protein that is important in blood clot formation

 

  1. _____ White blood cells that fight parasites

 

  1. _____ Type O blood is considered to be this

 

  1. _____ Liquid part of the blood with the clotting factors removed

 

  1. _____ Type AB blood is considered to be this

 

  1. _____ Red pigment of the red blood cell

 

  1. _____ Types of white blood cells that are phagocytes

 

  1. ANS:                     C         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Red blood cells

 

  1. ANS:                     F          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. ANS:                     A         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. ANS:                     H         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. ANS:                     E          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 286

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. ANS:                     I           DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 293

TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. ANS:                     B         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood composition

 

  1. ANS:                     J           DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 293

TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. ANS:                     G         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Red blood cells

 

  1. ANS:                     D         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

Match the term with the description or definition.

a. red blood cell j. fibrinogen
b. lymphocyte k. hematopoiesis
c. thrombocyte l. leukemia
d. globulin m. platelet
e. serum n. embolus
f. basophil o. formed elements
g. albumin p. anemia
h. eosinophil q. thrombus
i. plasma r. hematocrit test

 

 

  1. _____ Plasma protein that helps thicken the blood

 

  1. _____ White blood cell that helps protect against parasites

 

  1. _____ White blood cell that can be made in lymphatic tissue

 

  1. _____ Plasma protein necessary for blood clot formation

 

  1. _____ Another term for platelet

 

  1. _____ White blood cell that secretes heparin

 

  1. _____ Liquid part of the blood

 

  1. _____ Plasma protein that includes antibodies

 

  1. _____ Another term for erythrocyte

 

  1. _____ Liquid part of the blood minus the clotting factors

 

  1. _____ A formed element in the blood important in blood clot formation

 

  1. _____ Process of blood cell formation

 

  1. _____ A measure of the total blood volume made up by red blood cells

 

  1. _____ Part of a blood clot that has dislodged and is circulating through the bloodstream

 

  1. _____ A term for a number of conditions in which the blood is unable to carry a sufficient amount of oxygen

 

  1. _____ Term for all the cells and cell fragments suspended in the blood

 

  1. _____ A term used to describe a number of blood cancers affecting white blood cells

 

  1. _____ A blood clot that stays in the place where it was formed

 

  1. ANS:                     G         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. ANS:                     H         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. ANS:                     B         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 283 & 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. ANS:                     J           DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. ANS:                     C         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. ANS:                     F          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 288

TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. ANS:                     I           DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. ANS:                     D         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. ANS:                     A         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 283

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. ANS:                     E          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood plasma

 

  1. ANS:                     M         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. ANS:                     K         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 284

TOP:    Formed elements

 

  1. ANS:                     R         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 286

TOP:    Hematocrit test

 

  1. ANS:                     N         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 291

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. ANS:                     P          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 285

TOP:    Anemia

 

  1. ANS:                     O         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 281

TOP:    Blood composition

 

  1. ANS:                     L          DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    White blood cell disorders

 

  1. ANS:                     Q         DIF:                Memorization                           REF:    Page: 291

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. Explain the difference between serum and plasma.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 282

TOP:    Blood composition

 

  1. Describe the shape of the red blood cell. How does this shape allow it to function more efficiently?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Application     REF:    Page: 284        TOP:    Blood composition

 

  1. Explain the different roles played by B and T lymphocytes in the immune system.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288        TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. Name the three granular white blood cells and give a function of each.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 288        TOP:    White blood cells

 

  1. Explain fully the process of blood clot formation.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting

 

  1. Distinguish between the formation of a blood clot and the agglutination caused by the mixing of two different blood types.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Synthesis         REF:    Page: 289 & 291

TOP:    Blood composition/Blood types

 

  1. If a patient was having a stroke caused by a blood clot, which treatment would be more effective, giving the patient heparin or giving the patient streptokinase? Explain your answer.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Synthesis         REF:    Page: 289 & 291

TOP:    Platelets and blood clotting/Clinical application—Anticoagulant therapy

 

  1. Explain the difference between type A blood and type B blood.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 291        TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. What is it about type O blood that allows it to be considered the universal donor blood type?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Synthesis         REF:    Page: 293        TOP:    Blood types

 

  1. Explain how erythroblastosis fetalis develops. Why must the mother be Rh-negative for it to occur?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Synthesis         REF:    Page: 293 & 294

TOP:    Rh system/Erythroblastosis fetalis

 

  1. Explain what would happen at the chemical level if a person with type A blood were given type B blood.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Synthesis         REF:    Page: 291 & 292                                 TOP:    ABO system

 

  1. What is leukemia? Name and explain two types of leukemia.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:    Memorization                                     REF:    Page: 289

TOP:    White blood cell disorders