Structure & Function of the Body  14th Edition by Gary A. Thibodeau – Kevin T. Patton – Test Bank

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Structure & Function of the Body  14th Edition by Gary A. Thibodeau – Kevin T. Patton – Test Bank

 

Sample  Questions

 

Thibodeau & Patton: Structure & Function of the Body, 14th Edition

 

Chapter 06: The Skeletal System

 

Test Bank

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. The red bone marrow is important in the skeletal function of:
a. protection
b. support
c. hematopoiesis
d. storage

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Functions of the skeletal system

 

  1. Which of the following is not a function of the skeletal system?
a. movement
b. calcium storage
c. blood cell formation
d. all of the above are functions of the skeletal system

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Functions of the skeletal system

 

  1. The humerus is an example of:
a. a short bone
b. a long bone
c. a flat bone
d. an irregular bone

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Types of bones

 

  1. The wrist bone is an example of:
a. a short bone
b. a long bone
c. a flat bone
d. an irregular bone

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Types of bones

 

  1. The bones of the spine are examples of:
a. a short bone
b. a long bone
c. a flat bone
d. an irregular bone

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Types of bones

 

  1. The hollow shaft of a long bone is called the:
a. diaphysis
b. epiphyses
c. periosteum
d. endosteum

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. The thin, fibrous membrane that lines the medullary cavity is called the:
a. diaphysis
b. epiphysis
c. periosteum
d. endosteum

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. The strong, fibrous membrane covering the shaft of the long bone is called the:
a. diaphysis
b. epiphysis
c. periosteum
d. endosteum

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. The ends of long bones are called the:
a. diaphysis
b. epiphysis
c. periosteum
d. endosteum

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. Trabeculae are:
a. needlelike threads of spongy bone
b. the basic structure of cartilage
c. the basic structure of compact bone
d. the basic structure of bone marrow

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Another name for the Haversian system is:
a. central canal
b. lacunae
c. canaliculi
d. osteon

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The bone cells in the Haversian system are found in little spaces called:
a. central canal
b. canaliculi
c. lacunae
d. none of the above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Nutrients pass from the blood vessels to the bone cells by way of the:
a. central canal
b. canaliculi
c. lacunae
d. lamella

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The bone-forming cells are called:
a. osteoclasts
b. osteocytes
c. osteoblasts
d. chondrocytes

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 113

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. Cartilage cells are called:
a. osteoclasts
b. osteocytes
c. osteoblasts
d. chondrocytes

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The bone-resorbing cells are called:
a. osteoclasts
b. osteocytes
c. osteoblasts
d. chondrocytes

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 113

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. As long as this is present in a bone, bone growth can continue.
a. diaphysis
b. epiphyseal plate
c. epiphysis
d. osteoclasts

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 115

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. Which bone is not part of the axial skeleton?
a. ribs
b. vertebrae
c. carpal bone
d. sternum

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 123

TOP:  Appendicular skeleton—Upper extremity

 

  1. Which bone is not part of the appendicular skeleton?
a. humerus
b. ulna
c. tibia
d. hyoid bone

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 116       TOP:  Divisions of skeleton

 

  1. Which bone does not contain one of the paranasal sinuses?
a. mandible
b. maxillary
c. frontal
d. ethmoid

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 119

TOP:  Axial skeleton—Skull

 

  1. The upper jaw bone is called the:
a. zygomatic
b. maxilla
c. mandible
d. none of the above

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Table 6-2—Bones of the skull

 

  1. The cheekbone is called the:
a. zygomatic
b. maxilla
c. mandible
d. none of the above

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Table 6-2—Bones of the skull

 

  1. The bone at the back of the skull is called the:
a. temporal
b. parietal
c. sphenoid
d. none of the above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Table 6-2—Bones of the skull

 

  1. The section of the vertebral column that contains the most vertebrae is the:
a. cervical section
b. thoracic section
c. lumbar section
d. sacrum section

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Table 6-3—Bones of the vertebral column

 

  1. Ribs that attach individually to the sternum by way of the costal cartilage are:
a. true ribs
b. false ribs
c. floating ribs
d. none of the above

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 121 |Page: 122

TOP:  Thorax

 

  1. Ribs that do not attach to costal cartilage at all are:
a. true ribs
b. false ribs
c. floating ribs
d. none of the above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 121| Page: 122

TOP:  Thorax

 

  1. The two bones of the lower arm are the:
a. tibia and fibula
b. femur and humerus
c. ulna and radius
d. none of the above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 123

TOP:  Upper extremity

 

  1. The two bones of the lower leg are the:
a. tibia and fibula
b. femur and humerus
c. ulna and radius
d. none of the above

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 126

TOP:  Lower extremity

 

  1. The phalanges are the bones of the:
a. fingers
b. wrists
c. toes
d. both a and c above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 124|Page: 126

TOP:  Upper extremity and Lower extremity

 

  1. The metacarpals are the bones of the:
a. wrist
b. foot
c. ankle
d. none of the above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 123|Page: 124

TOP:  Upper extremity

 

  1. The tarsals are the bones of the:
a. wrist
b. foot
c. ankle
d. none of the above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 126

TOP:  Lower extremity

 

  1. The bone of the thigh is the:
a. ulna
b. radius
c. humerus
d. femur

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 124

TOP:  Lower extremity

 

  1. A suture is an example of a(n):
a. amphiarthrotic joint
b. synarthrotic joint
c. diarthrotic joint
d. none of the above

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 128       TOP:  Joints (articulations)

 

  1. The knee is an example of a(n):
a. amphiarthrotic joint
b. synarthrotic joint
c. diarthrotic joint
d. none of the above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 129       TOP:  Joints (articulations)

 

  1. The elbow is an example of a(n):
a. amphiarthrotic joint
b. synarthrotic joint
c. diarthrotic joint
d. none of the above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 129       TOP:  Joints (articulations)

 

  1. Which of the following is not a type of bone?
a. round
b. flat
c. long
d. short

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Types of bones

 

  1. In the adult skeleton, red bone marrow is found in the:
a. diaphysis
b. medullary canal
c. epiphysis
d. endosteum

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. Which of the following statements is true of both bone and cartilage?
a. They both contain more intercellular matrix than cells.
b. Both bone and cartilage cells are supplied with food and oxygen through canaliculi.
c. Both bone and cartilage cells are located in lacunae.
d. Both a and c are true.

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112 |Page: 113

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Which of the following statements is not true of ribs?
a. All ribs attach to vertebrae.
b. All ribs attach to the sternum.
c. There are three pairs of false ribs.
d. All of the above are true of ribs.

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 122

TOP:  Thorax

 

  1. The total number of phalanges in the body is:
a. 14
b. 28
c. 56
d. 84

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 124

TOP:  Table 6-5—Bones of the upper extremities | Table 6-6—Bones of the lower extremities

 

  1. Which bone is not part of the coxal bone?
a. sacrum
b. pubis
c. ischium
d. ilium

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 124

TOP:  Table 6-6—Bones of the lower extremities

 

  1. Moving from superficial to deep in a bone, the parts of the bone would be encountered in which sequence?
a. periosteum, endosteum, medullary cavity
b. endosteum, periosteum, medullary cavity
c. periosteum, medullary cavity, endosteum
d. endosteum, medullary cavity, periosteum

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 110|Page: 111

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. The lambdoidal suture is formed by the joining of the:
a. occipital bone and the temporal bones
b. temporal bones and the frontal bone
c. parietal bones and the occipital bone
d. parietal bones and the frontal bone

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 119

TOP:  Skull

 

  1. Going from superior to inferior, the regions of the spine would be in which order?
a. cervical, thoracic, sacrum, coccyx, lumbar
b. cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacrum, coccyx
c. cervical, lumbar, thoracic, coccyx, sacrum
d. cervical, thoracic, lumbar, coccyx, sacrum

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 120       TOP:  Spine (vertebral column)

 

  1. Straightening a bent elbow is:
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 131

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. Moving part of the body away from the midline of the body is:
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 132

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. Which of the following reduces the angle of a joint?
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 131

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. Moving the arm in a circle around the shoulder joint is:
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 132

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. Moving part of the body toward the midline of the body is:
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

ANS: E                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 132

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. Bending the elbow is:
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 131

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. Which of the following increases the angle of a joint?
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 131

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. Which of the following spins one bone relative to another?
a. flexion
b. rotation
c. abduction
d. extension
e. adduction
f. circumduction

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 131

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. The primary organ of the skeletal system is:
a. cartilage
b. bone
c. bone and cartilage
d. bone, cartilage, and the joints

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 109

TOP:  Introduction

 

  1. Which of the following is not true of calcitonin?
a. It is made in the thyroid gland.
b. It increases blood calcium.
c. It decreases blood calcium.
d. It increases calcium in the bone.

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Storage

 

  1. Which of the following is not true of PTH?
a. It is made in the parathyroid gland.
b. It increases blood calcium.
c. It decreases blood calcium.
d. It decreases bone calcium.

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Storage

 

  1. . A treatment method for osteoporosis, a condition where there is too little calcium in the bone, might be to:
a. stimulate the release of calcitonin from the parathyroid gland
b. stimulate the release of PTH from the thyroid gland
c. stimulate the release of calcitonin from the thyroid gland
d. none of the above would be a possible method of treatment

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Storage

 

  1. A bone that may develop in a tendon is called a(n):
a. sesamoid bone
b. irregular bone
c. long bone
d. none of the above would develop in a tendon

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Types of bones

 

  1. The diploe:
a. is found in the medullary cavity
b. is the outer layer of a long bone
c. is the inner layer of a long bone
d. is the middle layer of a flat bone

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Structure of flat bones

 

  1. Which of the following is not true of the male skeleton?
a. The bones tend to be larger than the female skeleton.
b. The pelvic opening is wider than the female pelvic opening.
c. The markings on the bones are larger and more distinct than in the female.
d. All of the above are true of the male skeleton.

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 127

TOP:  Differences between a man’s and a woman’s skeleton

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. The storage of calcium is an important function of the skeletal system.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Functions of the skeletal system

 

  1. The red bone marrow contributes to the support function of the skeletal system.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Functions of the skeletal system

 

  1. The carpals are an example of short bones.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Types of bones

 

  1. The vertebrae are examples of flat bones.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Types of bones

 

  1. The frontal bone of the skull is an example of an irregular bone.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Types of bones

 

  1. The diaphysis is the hollow shaft of the long bone.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. The articular cartilage covers and cushions the ends of the bones.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 1110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. The periosteum lines the medullary cavity.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. The epiphysis is the hollow area in the shaft of the bone where marrow is stored.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. The needlelike threads of spongy bone are called trabeculae.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The concentric rings surrounding the central canal of an osteon are called lamella.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Canaliculi are small canals that help supply the bone cells with food and oxygen.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The lacuna is a large canal in the center of the osteon that contains a blood vessel.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Chondrocytes are cartilage cells.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Osteoclasts are the bone-forming cells.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 113

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. Osteoblasts are the bone-resorbing cells.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 113

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. Most of the bones of the body begin as cartilage.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 115

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. As long as the epiphyseal plate remains between the diaphysis and epiphysis, bone growth can continue.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 115

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. The “soft spots” in a baby’s skull are referred to as fontanels.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 119

TOP:  Skull

 

  1. Osteoporosis is a weakening of the bone and occurs most often in women of childbearing age.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 115

TOP:  Health and Well-Being: Osteoporosis

 

  1. Vitamin C supplements are sometimes given to women to help prevent osteoporosis.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 115

TOP:  Health and Well-Being: Osteoporosis

 

  1. An improperly treated epiphyseal fracture can result in the affected limb being shorter than normal.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 119

TOP:  Clinical Application: Epiphyseal Fracture

 

  1. The bones of the middle ear are part of the axial skeleton.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Skull

 

  1. There are more bones in the axial skeleton than in the appendicular skeleton.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Table 6-1—Main parts of the skeleton

 

  1. The occipital bone is the bone in the back of the skull.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Table 6-2—Bones of the skull

 

  1. The maxilla is the bone of the lower jaw.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Table 6-2—Bones of the skull

 

  1. The zygomatic bone is the cheekbone.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Table 6-2—Bones of the skull

 

  1. Going from superior to inferior, the sequence of the vertebrae is cervical, thoracic, lumbar, coccyx, and sacrum.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 120

TOP:  Spine (vertebral column)

 

  1. The curves of the spine are important in supporting the weight of the rest of the body.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 121

TOP:  Spine (vertebral column)

 

  1. The ribs that individually attach to a costal cartilage and then to the sternum are called true ribs.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 121

TOP:  Thorax

 

  1. The last two sets of ribs that are only attached to the vertebrae are called false ribs.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 122

TOP:  Thorax

 

  1. The sternum is also called the breastbone.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 121

TOP:  Thorax

 

  1. The scapula and clavicle make up the pectoral girdle.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 123

TOP:  Upper extremity

 

  1. The tibia and fibula are the bones of the lower arm.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 123

TOP:  Upper extremity

 

  1. The femur is the bone of the thigh.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 124

TOP:  Lower extremity

 

  1. The phalanges are the bones of the fingers and toes.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 124|Page: 126

TOP:  Upper extremity | Lower extremity

 

  1. The tibia and fibula are bones of the lower leg.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 126

TOP:  Lower extremity

 

  1. The carpals are the bones of the hand.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 123

TOP:  Upper extremity

 

  1. The tarsals are the bones of the ankle.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 126

TOP:  Lower extremity | Table 6-6—Bones of the lower extremities

 

  1. The patella is another term for the kneecap.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 126

TOP:  Lower extremity

 

  1. The olecranon process is another term for the elbow.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 124

TOP:  Table 6-5—Bones of the upper extremities

 

  1. The metacarpals are the bones of the foot.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 123|Page: 124

TOP:  Upper extremity

 

  1. One of the main differences between the male skeleton and female skeleton is the shape of the pelvis.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 127

TOP:  Differences between a man’s and a woman’s skeleton

 

  1. A joint with only slight movement is called a diarthrotic joint.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 128

TOP:  Joints (articulations)

 

  1. A joint with no movement is called a synarthrotic joint.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 128

TOP:  Joints (articulations)

 

  1. A diarthrotic joint is a freely moving joint.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 128

TOP:  Joints (articulations)

 

  1. The sutures of the skull are synarthrotic joints.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 128

TOP:  Joints (articulations)

 

  1. The knee is an amphiarthrotic joint.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 128

TOP:  Joints (articulations)

 

  1. The hip is a diarthrotic joint.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 129

TOP:  Joints (articulations)

 

  1. A ligament is a band of connective tissue that holds two bones together.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 129

TOP:  Joints (articulations)

 

  1. The hinge joint provides the widest range of motion for the body.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 130

TOP:  Joints (articulations)

 

  1. To increase the angle of a joint is the definition of flexion.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 131

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. To increase the angle of a joint is the definition of extension.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 131

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. To move a part of the body away from the midline is called adduction.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 132

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. To move a part of the body toward the midline is called adduction.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 132

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. The word “articulation” is another word for joint.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 109

TOP:  Introduction

 

  1. The interaction between muscle and bone allows the body to move.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 110       TOP:  Movement

 

  1. The function of hematopoiesis is accomplished in the osteon of the bone.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Hemopoiesis

 

  1. In the adult skeleton, the function of hematopoiesis occurs in the medullary canal.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 110       TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. Between the two diaphyses of a long bone is the epiphysis.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. The endosteum is more interior (deep) than the periosteum.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 111       TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. Both bone and cartilage are examples of connective tissue.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The central canal of the osteon is also called the medullary cavity.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The terms osteon and Haversian system refer to the same structure.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Osteocytes can be found in the lacunae of the osteon.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Like bone cells, cartilage cells are located in lacunae.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Canaliculi supply food and oxygen to cartilage cells.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts do opposite functions in the bone.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 113       TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. The skull is formed by endochondral ossification.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 115

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. When fontanels fuse, they form sutures.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 119|Page: 120

TOP:  Skull

 

  1. The spine has three curves: two convex and one concave.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 121

TOP:  Spine (vertebral column)

 

  1. Because the last two sets of ribs are not attached to any other bones in the body, they are called floating ribs.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 122

TOP:  Thorax

 

  1. Only the true ribs attach to the sternum by the costal cartilage.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 121       TOP:  Thorax

 

  1. The olecranon process of the humerus and the olecranon fossa of the ulna make up the structure of the elbow.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 124

TOP:  Table 6-5—Bones of the upper extremities

 

  1. The indentation in the femur where the patella or kneecap fits is called the acetabulum.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 126

TOP:  Lower extremity

 

  1. Bones are the primary organ of the skeletal system.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 109

TOP:  Introduction

 

  1. Bones are the only major structure in the body that is not considered living.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 109

TOP:  Introduction

 

  1. The articular cartilage covers and protects the diaphysis of the long bones.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. The calcified rings of compact bone are called canaliculi.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. The curves of the spine in the cervical and lumbar regions are the convex curves of the spine.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 121

TOP:  Spine (vertebral column)

 

  1. The head of the femur fits into a deep, cup-shaped socket in the coxal bone called the acetabulum.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 126

TOP:  Lower extremity

 

  1. The incus is a bone found in the skull.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Table 6-2—Bones of the skull

 

  1. Calcitonin increases the mineralization of bone.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Storage

 

  1. Parathyroid hormone decreases the concentration of calcium in the blood.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Storage

 

  1. Parathyroid hormone and calcitonin have opposite effects on the concentration of calcium in the blood.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Storage

 

  1. In a flat bone, the compact layer of bone on either side of the spongy layer of bone is called the diploe.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Structure of flat bones

 

  1. One of the differences between bone and cartilage is that in cartilage the matrix is more gel-like than the calcified matrix of bone.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Trapped osteoblasts become osteocytes.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112|Page: 113

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. The body has 20 phalanges; 10 on the hands and 10 on the feet.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 124|Page: 126

TOP:  Upper extremity and Lower extremity

 

  1. A bursa is a shock-absorbing pocket of fluid found in some joints.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 130

TOP:  Joints (articulations)

 

MATCHING

 

Match each of the terms with the correct definition, description, or function.

a. Diaphysis
b. Epiphyses
c. Periosteum
d. Endosteum
e. Medullary cavity
f. Osteoclast
g. Osteoblast
h. Canaliculi
i. Lacuna
j. Epiphyseal plate
k. Diarthrotic
l. Hematopoiesis
m. Synarthrotic
n. Articulations
o. Amphiarthrotic

 

 

  1. Bone-forming cells

 

  1. Hollow shaft of the long bone

 

  1. A bone can grow as long as this remains

 

  1. Thin layer of connective tissue that lines the medullary canal

 

  1. Small canals that carry nutrients to bone cells

 

  1. Tough connective tissue surrounding the shaft of long bones

 

  1. Hollow part of the bone where marrow is stored

 

  1. Bone-resorbing cells

 

  1. Small spaces in the bone matrix where bone cells are located

 

  1. Ends of long bones

 

  1. Type of joint that allows no movement

 

  1. Refers to the process of blood cell formation

 

  1. Type of joint that allows for free movement

 

  1. Another term for joints

 

  1. Type of joint that allows for slight, limited movement

 

  1. ANS: G                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 113

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. ANS: J                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 115

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 111

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. ANS: H                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. ANS: E                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 113

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. ANS: I                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. ANS: M                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 128

TOP:  Kinds of joints

 

  1. ANS: L                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 110

TOP:  Functions of the skeletal system

 

  1. ANS: K                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 128

TOP:  Kinds of joints

 

  1. ANS: N                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 109

TOP:  Introduction

 

  1. ANS: O                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 128

TOP:  Kinds of joints

 

Match each bone with its description or location.

a. Femur
b. Humerus
c. Ulna
d. Fibula
e. Zygomatic bone
f. Mandible
g. Carpals
h. Metatarsals
i. Patella
j. Ribs
k. Phalanges
l. Sternum
m. Stapes

 

 

  1. Cheekbone

 

  1. Bone of the thigh

 

  1. Bones of the wrist

 

  1. Can be true, false, or floating

 

  1. One of the bones of the lower leg

 

  1. Bone of the upper arm

 

  1. Kneecap

 

  1. One of the bones of the lower arm

 

  1. Bone of the lower jaw

 

  1. Bones of the foot

 

  1. One of the bones of the middle ear

 

  1. Bones of the fingers and toes

 

  1. Breast bone to which the ribs attach

 

  1. ANS: E                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Table 6-2—Bones of the skull

 

  1. ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 126

TOP:  Table 6-6—Bones of the lower extremities

 

  1. ANS: G                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 124

TOP:  Table 6-5—Bones of the upper extremities

 

  1. ANS: J                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 121| Page: 122

TOP:  Thorax

 

  1. ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 126

TOP:  Table 6-6—Bones of the lower extremities

 

  1. ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 124

TOP:  Table 6-5—Bones of the upper extremities

 

  1. ANS: I                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 126

TOP:  Table 6-6—Bones of the lower extremities

 

  1. ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 124

TOP:  Table 6-5—Bones of the upper extremities

 

  1. ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Table 6-2—Bones of the skull

 

  1. ANS: H                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 126

TOP:  Table 6-6—Bones of the lower extremities

 

  1. ANS: M                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 117

TOP:  Table 6-2—Bones of the skull

 

  1. ANS: K                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 124|Page: 126

TOP:  Table 6-5—Bones of the upper extremities | Table 6-6—Bones of the lower extremities

 

  1. ANS: L                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 121

TOP:  Thorax

 

Match each type of joint movement with its definition or description.

a. Adduction
b. Flexion
c. Circumduction
d. Rotation
e. Abduction
f. Extension

 

 

  1. Reduction of the angle of a joint

 

  1. Moves a limb toward the midline of the body

 

  1. Moves the distal end of a bone in a circle

 

  1. Increases the angle of a joint

 

  1. Spins one bone relative to another

 

  1. Moves a limb away from the midline of the body

 

  1. ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 131

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 132

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 132

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 131

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 131

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

  1. ANS: E                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 132

TOP:  Table 6-7—Types of joint movements

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Name and explain the functions of the skeletal system.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 110

TOP:  Functions of the skeletal system

 

  1. Name the types of bone described in the text and give an example of each.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 110      TOP:    Types of bones

 

  1. List and briefly explain the structures of the long bone.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 110|Page: 111

TOP:  Structure of long bones

 

  1. Describe the structure of the osteon.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 111|Page: 112

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. Bone heals well, yet cartilage does not heal well at all. Based on the microscopic structure of each, explain why this is the case.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 111|Page: 113

TOP:  Microscopic structure of bone and cartilage

 

  1. What is osteoporosis? How can it be prevented or treated?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 115

TOP:  Health and Well-Being: Osteoporosis

 

  1. Explain the function of the following cells: osteoblast, osteoclasts, and epiphyseal plates.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 113|Page: 115

TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. A boy in his late teens who was 5 feet, 1 inch tall wanted to be given growth hormone. The doctor took x rays of his skeleton and found that there were no epiphyseal plates in his long bones. What should he tell the boy about his request for growth hormone? Explain your answer.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 115      TOP:  Bone formation and growth

 

  1. What important function explains the biggest difference between the male skeleton and female skeleton?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 127

TOP:  Differences between a man’s and a woman’s skeleton

 

  1. Name the types of joints in the body and give an example of each.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 128| Page: 129                                TOP:   Joints (articulations)

 

  1. Pick a limb of the body, either an arm or leg, and name the bones in that limb, starting proximally and moving distally.

 

ANS:

Either: Humerus, ulna, radius, carpals, metacarpals, phalanges OR Femur, tibia, fibula, tarsals, metatarsals, phalanges

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 123|Page: 127

TOP:  Upper extremity and Lower extremity

 

  1. Where are the hormones calcitonin and parathyroid hormone made? What is the effect of each hormone on the concentration of calcium in the blood and the mineralization of bone?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 110      TOP:    Storage

 

  1. Describe the structure of flat bones.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 111      TOP:    Structure of flat bones

 

  1. Explain where the curves of the spine are located and what impact the curves have on the functions of the spine.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 121      TOP:    Spine (vertebral column)

 

  1. Name and describe the types of ribs.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 121|Page: 122

TOP:  Thorax

Thibodeau & Patton: Structure & Function of the Body, 14th Edition

 

Chapter 07: The Muscular System

 

Test Bank

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Striations are found in:
a. smooth muscle
b. skeletal muscle
c. cardiac muscle
d. both b and c

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 142       TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. Intercalated disks are found in:
a. smooth muscle
b. skeletal muscle
c. cardiac muscle
d. voluntary muscle

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. Another name for smooth muscle is:
a. cardiac muscle
b. visceral muscle
c. voluntary muscle
d. skeletal muscle

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. Another name for skeletal muscle is:
a. cardiac muscle
b. visceral muscle
c. voluntary muscle
d. involuntary muscle

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. The muscle attachment to the more movable bone is called the:
a. origin
b. insertion
c. tendon
d. bursae

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. The muscle attachment to the more stationary bone is called the:
a. origin
b. insertion
c. tendon
d. bursae

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. The connective tissue that attaches muscle to bone is called:
a. origin
b. insertion
c. tendon
d. bursae

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. A fluid-filled sac that acts as a lubricating structure for muscle movement is a(n):
a. origin
b. insertion
c. tendon
d. bursae

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. If an injury caused damage to the insertion of the biceps brachii muscle (the anterior muscle of the upper arm), the injury would be nearest:
a. the shoulder
b. the middle of the upper arm
c. the elbow
d. none of the above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 143       TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. The thin myofilament of the skeletal muscles is made of:
a. sarcomere
b. actin
c. myosin
d. Z lines

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. The thick myofilament of the skeletal muscles is made of:
a. sarcomere
b. actin
c. myosin
d. Z lines

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. The basic contractile unit of a skeletal muscle is the:
a. sarcomere
b. actin
c. myosin
d. Z lines

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. When a muscle contraction occurs:
a. the actin gets shorter
b. the myosin gets shorter
c. the Z lines are pulled closer together
d. both a and b

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 143|Page: 144

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. According to the sliding filament model, in order for a sarcomere to contract:
a. bridges must form between the actin and myosin
b. calcium must be released from the endoplasmic reticulum
c. ATP must be broken down for energy
d. all of the above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 144

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. To produce smooth movement at a joint:
a. the prime mover and antagonists must contract
b. the antagonist and synergists must contract
c. the prime mover and synergists must contract
d. both a and b above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 145|Page: 146

TOP:  Movement

 

  1. Tonic contractions:
a. move a muscle through a full range of motion
b. do not shorten the muscle
c. are important in maintaining posture
d. both b and c above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 146

TOP:  Posture

 

  1. The point of contact between the nerve and the muscle fibers it stimulates is called a:
a. motor unit
b. neuromuscular junction
c. motor neuron
d. neurotransmitter

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 148

TOP:  Motor unit

 

  1. A single motor neuron with all the muscle cells it innervates is called a:
a. motor unit
b. neuromuscular junction
c. neurotransmitter
d. both b and c above

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Motor unit

 

  1. The minimal level of stimulation required to cause a fiber to contract is called:
a. a threshold stimulus
b. the all-or-none law
c. twitch contraction
d. tetanic contraction

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Muscle stimulus

 

  1. When a muscle fiber is subjected to a stimulus, it contracts completely. This is called:
a. threshold stimulus
b. the all-or-none-law
c. twitch contraction
d. tetanic contraction

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Muscle stimulus

 

  1. What allows you to lift different weights with the same muscle is the:
a. difference in the threshold stimulus
b. number of motor units used by the muscle
c. all-or-none law
d. isometric contraction of the muscle fibers

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 149       TOP:  Muscle stimulus

 

  1. The muscle contracts and shortens and the insertion end moves toward the point of origin. This sentence describes:
a. twitch contractions
b. tetanic contractions
c. isotonic contractions
d. isometric contractions

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Isotonic contraction

 

  1. The muscle contracts but does not shorten, even though an increase in muscle tension does occur. This sentence describes:
a. twitch contractions
b. tetanic contractions
c. isotonic contractions
d. isometric contractions

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Isometric contraction

 

  1. Strength training leads to:
a. an increased number of myofilaments
b. an increased number of muscle fibers
c. muscle atrophy
d. both a and b above

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 150

TOP:  Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Endurance training leads to:
a. an increased number of myofilaments
b. an increased number of muscle fibers
c. an increased number of blood vessels to the muscle
d. muscle atrophy

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 151

TOP:  Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Which of the following muscles is not a muscle of the head and neck?
a. frontal
b. masseter
c. latissimus dorsi
d. zygomaticus

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 154

TOP:  Muscles of the head and neck

 

  1. Which of the following muscles is not a muscle that moves the upper extremities?
a. biceps brachii
b. triceps brachii
c. latissimus dorsi
d. rectus abdominis

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 157

TOP:  Muscles that move the upper extremities

 

  1. Which of the following muscles is not a muscle of the trunk?
a. rectus abdominis
b. iliopsoas
c. internal oblique
d. external oblique

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 155|Page: 157

TOP:  Muscles of the trunk

 

  1. Which of the following muscles is not a muscle that moves the lower extremities?
a. sartorius
b. trapezius
c. iliopsoas
d. gracilis

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 157|Page: 158

TOP:  Muscles that move the lower extremities

 

  1. The term that refers to ankle and foot movement is:
a. supination
b. pronation
c. dorsiflexion
d. both a and b above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. The movement that is opposite dorsiflexion is:
a. supination
b. pronation
c. rotation
d. plantar flexion

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. Movement around a longitudinal axis is:
a. supination
b. rotation
c. dorsiflexion
d. pronation

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. Moving a part of the body away from the midline of the body is called:
a. adduction
b. abduction
c. rotation
d. pronation

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. Moving a part of the body toward the midline of the body is called:
a. adduction
b. abduction
c. rotation
d. pronation

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. The hand position when the body is in anatomical position is:
a. dorsiflexion
b. pronation
c. supination
d. plantar flexion

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. The opposite movement of rotation is:
a. flexion
b. abduction
c. pronation
d. none of the above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. A bursae is a saclike structure that is filled with:
a. blood
b. synovial fluid
c. blood plasma
d. lymph

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. If a prime mover flexes a joint:
a. the synergist will extend the joint
b. the synergist and antagonist will extend the joint
c. the antagonist will extend the joint
d. the antagonist will assist in flexing the joint

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 146       TOP:  Movement

 

  1. What part of the body does the pectoralis major move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 154

TOP:  Muscles that move the upper extremities

 

  1. What part of the body does the external oblique move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 157

TOP:  Muscles of the trunk

 

  1. What part of the body does the masseter move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 154

TOP:  Muscles of the head and neck

 

  1. What part of the body does the sartorius move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Muscles that move the lower extremities

 

  1. What part of the body does the zygomaticus move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 154

TOP:  Muscles of the head and neck

 

  1. What part of the body does the sternocleidomastoid move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 154

TOP:  Muscles of the head and neck

 

  1. What part of the body does the deltoid move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 154

TOP:  Muscles that move the upper extremities

 

  1. What part of the body does the biceps femoris move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 158

TOP:  Muscles that move the lower extremities

 

  1. What part of the body does the rectus abdominis move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 157

TOP:  Muscles of the trunk

 

  1. What part of the body does the gastrocnemius move?
a. head and neck
b. upper extremities
c. trunk of the body
d. lower extremities

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 158

TOP:  Muscles that move the lower extremities

 

  1. If you weigh 120 pounds, your skeletal muscles weigh about:
a. 50 pounds
b. 60 pounds
c. 70 pounds
d. 40 pounds

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 141

TOP:  Introduction

 

  1. Groups of muscle fibers are called:
a. microfilaments
b. fascia
c. fascicles
d. none of the above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. The loose connective tissue outside the muscle organs that forms a flexible, sticky “packing material” between the muscles, bone, and skin is called:
a. microfilaments
b. fascia
c. fascicles
d. tendons

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. When calcium is released into the sarcomere:
a. it attaches to the myosin heads
b. acts as a cross bridge between actin and myosin
c. stimulates an ATP molecule to release energy
d. removes the blocking protein from the actin

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 144

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. Tension during muscle lengthening is often called:
a. isotonic contractions
b. isometric contractions
c. eccentric contractions
d. antagonist contractions

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 146

TOP:  Movement

 

  1. Which of the following systems do not play a role in body movement?
a. nervous system
b. respiratory system
c. circulatory system
d. all of the above systems play a role in body movements

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 148

TOP:  Role of other body systems in movement

 

  1. This is a quick, jerky response to a stimulus seen in isolated muscles but is not important in normal muscle activity:
a. twitch contraction
b. tetanic contraction
c. isometric contraction
d. isotonic contraction

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Twitch and tetanic contractions

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. Skeletal muscle is also called striated muscle.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. Smooth muscle is also called voluntary muscle.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. Cardiac muscle is found in the heart.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. Like skeletal muscles, cardiac muscles have striations.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. Like skeletal muscles, cardiac muscles have intercalated disks.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. Involuntary muscles are also called visceral muscles.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. Tendons anchor muscles to bones.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. The insertion of a muscle is on the more stationary bone.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. The origin of a muscle is on the more movable bone.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. The origin of a muscle is on the more stationary bone.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. Bursae are small, fluid-filled sacs that lie between some tendons and bones.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. The thin myofilament in a muscle fiber is made of actin.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. The thick myofilament in a muscle fiber is made of actin.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. The basic contractile unit of a muscle is called a sarcomere.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. Z lines mark the ends of individual sarcomeres.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. In order for the necessary bridges to form, potassium must be released from the endoplasmic reticulum.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 144

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. In the sliding filament model of muscle contraction, bridges are formed between the myosin and actin.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 144

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. Energy for muscle contraction is provided when ATP is broken down.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 144

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. In order for movement to take place, when the prime mover contracts, the synergist must relax.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 146

TOP:  Movement

 

  1. In order for movement to take place, the antagonists must do the opposite of the prime mover.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 146       TOP:  Movement

 

  1. Tonic contractions provide rapid movement for skeletal muscles.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 146

TOP:  Posture

 

  1. Good posture can be defined as holding the body parts in the position that favors best function.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 146

TOP:  Posture

 

  1. The production of heat is a function of the muscular system.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 147

TOP:  Heat production

 

  1. Hypothermia refers to a dangerous elevation in body temperature.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 147

TOP:  Heat production

 

  1. The breakdown of ATP is the energy source that helps supply heat to the body.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 147

TOP:  Heat production

 

  1. During strenuous exercise, the muscles’ use of oxygen and nutrients can outstrip the blood’s ability to supply them.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 147

TOP:  Fatigue

 

  1. When muscles must use energy release that does not require oxygen, the waste product ascorbic acid is produced, which can cause soreness in the muscle.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 147

TOP:  Fatigue

 

  1. The term oxygen debt describes the continued increased metabolism that must occur in a cell to remove the excess acid that accumulates during prolonged exercise.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 147

TOP:  Fatigue

 

  1. The respiratory and nervous systems, in addition to the muscular system, play important roles in body movement.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 148

TOP:  Role of other body systems in movement

 

  1. A motor neuron and all the muscle cells it stimulates are called a neuromuscular junction.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 148

TOP:  Motor unit

 

  1. A motor neuron and all the muscle cells it stimulates are called a motor unit.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Motor unit

 

  1. The point of contact between the nerve and muscle is called a motor unit.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 148

TOP:  Motor unit

 

  1. The minimum level of stimulation required to cause a muscle fiber to contract is called the threshold stimulus.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Muscle stimulus

 

  1. When a muscle fiber is exposed to a greater-than-threshold stimulus, it contracts completely. This is called an all-or-none response.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Muscle stimulus

 

  1. All motor units in a given muscle have the same threshold stimulus.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 149       TOP:  Muscle stimulus

 

  1. The lifting of a 10-lb weight requires the activation of fewer motor units than the lifting of a 5-lb weight.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 149       TOP:  Muscle stimulus

 

  1. Twitch contractions play an important role in normal muscle activity.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Twitch and tetanic contractions

 

  1. Lifting your textbook off the desk is an example of an isotonic muscle contraction.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 149       TOP:  Isotonic contraction

 

  1. Trying to lift a car (and failing) is an example of an isotonic muscle contraction.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 149       TOP:  Isometric contraction

 

  1. In an isometric contraction, no movement occurs but the muscle tension increases.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Isometric contraction

 

  1. Prolonged inactivity in a muscle can result in disuse hypertrophy.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 150

TOP:  Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Strength training results in an increase in the number of muscle fibers.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 150

TOP:  Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Strength training results in an increase in the number of myofilaments in each muscle fiber.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 150

TOP:  Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Endurance training causes muscle hypertrophy.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 151

TOP:  Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Endurance training increases the blood flow to a muscle.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 151

TOP:  Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Tenosynovitis in the wrist can cause carpal tunnel syndrome.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 151

TOP:  Clinical Application: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

 

  1. The contraction of the biceps brachii muscle causes flexion of the elbow joint.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. Dorsiflexion allows you to stand on your toes.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. Raising your arm laterally away from your body is an example of adduction.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. In the anatomical position, the hands are supinated.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. Movement of your hand from a supinated to pronated position requires rotation of the forearm.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. Most anabolic steroids are made of synthetic testosterone.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 159

TOP:  Research, Issues, & Trends: Enhancing Muscle Strength

 

  1. Research has shown that anabolic steroids do not increase muscle size and strength.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 159

TOP:  Research, Issues, & Trends: Enhancing Muscle Strength

 

  1. Research has shown that prolonged use of anabolic steroids can have severe, even life-threatening, consequences.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 159

TOP:  Research, Issues, & Trends: Enhancing Muscle Strength

 

  1. The overuse of vitamins can cause a serious health problem called hypervitaminosis.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 159

TOP:  Research, Issues, & Trends: Enhancing Muscle Strength

 

  1. Skeletal muscle cells contain more than one nucleus.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 141

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. All muscles specialize in contraction or shortening.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. Bursae and tendon sheaths have the same function.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. The pull of gravity assists the muscles in maintaining body posture.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 146

TOP:  Posture

 

  1. When stimulated, the entire muscle follows the all-or-none law.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Muscle stimulus

 

  1. Both tonic and isotonic contractions cause movement of a joint.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 149       TOP:  Isotonic contraction

 

  1. Another name for aerobic training is strength training.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 150

TOP:  Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. If you weigh 120 pounds, you have about 50 pounds of skeletal muscles.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 141

TOP:  Introduction

 

  1. A fascicle is the loose connective tissue that forms the “packing material” between muscles, bone, and skin.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. Fascicles are groups of muscle fibers.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle organs

 

  1. Each shaft-like actin fiber has a “head” that sticks out toward the myosin fiber.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. The main function of calcium when it is released into the sarcomere is to assist ATP in energy release.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 144

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. The main function of calcium when it is released into the sarcomere is to free the binding protein form the actin and allow it to bind with myosin.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 144

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. Skeletal muscles contain a substance called myoglobin that helps store oxygen.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 144

TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. Tension during muscle lengthening is often called a tonic contraction.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 146

TOP:  Movement

 

  1. The zygomaticus is sometimes called the “kissing muscle.”

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 154

TOP:  Muscles of the head and neck

 

  1. Neither the intercostal muscles nor the diaphragm can be seen from outside the body.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 157       TOP:  Muscles of the trunk

 

  1. There are three muscles that make up the hamstring muscles.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 158

TOP:  Muscles that move the lower extremities

 

MATCHING

 

Match each of the terms with its definition or explanation.

a. Skeletal muscle
b. Smooth muscle
c. Origin
d. Insertion
e. Actin
f. Myosin
g. Motor unit
h. Neuromuscular junction
i. Isotonic
j. Isometric

 

 

  1. Protein that makes the thin myofilament

 

  1. Another name for voluntary muscle

 

  1. Type of muscle contraction in which the muscle shortens and the joint moves

 

  1. Point of contact between the nerve ending and the muscle fiber

 

  1. Attachment point to the bone that moves during muscle contraction

 

  1. Another name for visceral muscle

 

  1. Protein that makes up the thick myofilament

 

  1. Attachment point to the bone that is stationary during contraction

 

  1. Muscle contraction in which the muscle tenses but does not shorten

 

  1. Single motor neuron with all the muscle cells it innervates

 

  1. ANS: E                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Microscopic structure

 

  1. ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. ANS: I                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Isotonic contraction

 

  1. ANS: H                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 148

TOP:  Motor unit

 

  1. ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Microscopic structure

 

  1. ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 143

TOP:  Structure of skeletal muscle

 

  1. ANS: J                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Isometric contraction

 

  1. ANS: G                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 149

TOP:  Motor unit

 

Match the muscles of the head and neck with their function.

a. Orbicularis oris
b. Orbicularis oculi
c. Sternocleidomastoid
d. Masseter
e. Frontal
f. Zygomaticus
g. Trapezius

 

 

  1. Rotates and flexes the head and neck

 

  1. Closes the jaw

 

  1. Extends the head and neck

 

  1. Raises eyebrows

 

  1. Closes eyes

 

  1. Elevates corners of the mouth and lips

 

  1. Draws lips together

 

  1. ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: G                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: E                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

Match the muscles that move the upper extremities and the muscles of the trunk with their function.

a. Latissimus dorsi
b. Deltoid
c. Triceps brachii
d. Pectoralis major
e. Biceps brachii
f. Rectus abdominis
g. External oblique

 

 

  1. Extends elbow

 

  1. Abducts upper arm

 

  1. Flexes trunk

 

  1. Flexes and helps adduct upper arm

 

  1. Extends and helps adduct upper arm

 

  1. Compresses abdomen

 

  1. Flexes elbow

 

  1. ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: G                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: E                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

Match the muscles that move the lower extremity with their function.

a. Tibialis anterior
b. Iliopsoas
c. Gastrocnemius
d. Sartorius
e. Adductor group
f. Hamstring group
g. Gluteus maximus
h. Quadriceps group

 

 

  1. Plantar flexes the ankle

 

  1. Flexes thigh or trunk

 

  1. Extends knee

 

  1. Flexes knee

 

  1. Flexes thigh and rotates lower leg

 

  1. Dorsiflexes the ankle

 

  1. Adducts thigh

 

  1. Extends thigh

 

  1. ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: H                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: E                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

  1. ANS: G                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 156

TOP:  Table 7-1—Principal muscles of the body

 

Match the body movement term with its definition.

a. Flexion
b. Extension
c. Abduction
d. Adduction
e. Supination
f. Pronation
g. Dorsiflexion
h. Plantar flexion
i. Inversion
j. Eversion

 

 

  1. The top of the foot is elevated with the toes pointing upward

 

  1. Makes the angle between the two bones at the joint smaller

 

  1. Turns the ankle so the bottom of the foot faces toward the midline of the body

 

  1. Results in the hand position with the palm turned toward the anterior position

 

  1. Moving part of the body toward the midline of the body

 

  1. Turns the ankle so the bottom of the foot faces toward the lateral side of the body

 

  1. Makes the angle between the two bones at a joint larger

 

  1. Results in the hand position with the palm turned toward the posterior position

 

  1. Moving part of the body away from the midline of the body

 

  1. The bottom of the foot is directed downward so you are standing on your toes

 

  1. ANS: G                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 151

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. ANS: I                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. ANS: E                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. ANS: J                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

  1. ANS: H                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Name and give the location of the three types of muscle tissue.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 141|Page: 142

TOP:  Muscle tissue

 

  1. Differentiate between the origin and insertion of a muscle.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 143      TOP:    Muscle organs

 

  1. Using the sliding filament model of muscle contraction, explain fully how a muscle contracts.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 144      TOP:  Microscopic structure and function

 

  1. In the flexion of the elbow, which muscle group functions as the prime mover, a synergist, and an antagonist?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 146      TOP:  Movement

 

  1. Explain how a muscle becomes fatigued. What is the oxygen debt and how is it repaid?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 147      TOP:  Fatigue

 

  1. What is the all-or-none response? If the all-or-none response occurs in muscle cells, explain what occurs differently in a muscle when you lift a 5-lb weight and a 50-lb weight.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 148|Page: 149                                 TOP:   Muscle stimulus|Motor unit

 

  1. Explain the difference between an isotonic and isometric muscle contraction.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 149|Page: 150

TOP:  Isotonic contraction | Isometric contraction

 

  1. For what type of sport would endurance training be best? For what type of sport would strength training be best? Explain your answers.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 150|Page: 152

TOP:  Effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

 

  1. Explain carpal tunnel syndrome. What is a possible cure?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 151

TOP:  Clinical Application: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

 

  1. Describe a movement that would be an example of each of the following: flexion, extension, abduction, rotation, and plantar flexion.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 152

TOP:  Movements produced by skeletal muscle contractions

Thibodeau & Patton: Structure & Function of the Body, 14th Edition

 

Chapter 09: The Senses

 

Test Bank

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. The sense of hearing can be classified as a:
a. proprioceptor
b. mechanoreceptor
c. thermoreceptor
d. photoreceptor

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 206

TOP:  Special sense organs

 

  1. The sense of sight can be classified as a:
a. proprioceptor
b. chemoreceptor
c. thermoreceptor
d. photoreceptor

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 206

TOP:  Table 9-2—Special sense organs

 

  1. The Golgi tendon receptors can be classified as:
a. proprioceptors
b. chemoreceptors
c. thermoreceptors
d. photoreceptors

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 206

TOP:  Table 9-1—General sense organs

 

  1. The free nerve endings in the skin respond to:
a. high-frequency vibration
b. low-frequency vibration
c. pain
d. all of the above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 206

TOP:  Table 9-1—General sense organs

 

  1. General sense organs can be found in the highest concentration in:
a. muscle tissue
b. the skin
c. the tendons and connective tissue
d. the deep internal organs

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  General sense organs

 

  1. The white part of the eye is called the:
a. cornea
b. choroid
c. iris
d. sclera

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 208

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The conjunctiva:
a. is a mucous membrane covering part of the eye
b. opens and closes to regulate the light entering the eye
c. is the colored part of the eye
d. is the clear part of the sclera

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The colored part of the eye is called the:
a. conjunctiva
b. pupil
c. iris
d. lacrimal gland

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The cornea:
a. is the colored part of the eye
b. produces tears
c. is the mucous covering of the eye
d. is the clear part of the sclera in the front of the eye

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 208

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The pupil:
a. is a hole that lets light into the eye
b. is the colored part of the eye
c. produces tears
d. helps focus light on the rear of the eye

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The choroid layer:
a. helps focus light on the rear of the eye
b. produces tears
c. prevents the scattering of incoming light rays
d. is the white of the eye

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The innermost layer of the eye is the:
a. conjunctiva
b. choroid
c. sclera
d. retina

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The rods in the eye:
a. are part of the choroid layer
b. respond to the colors red, green, and blue
c. are used to see in dim light
d. both a and b above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The cones in the eye:
a. are part of the retinal layer
b. respond to the colors red, green, and blue
c. are used to see in dim light
d. both a and b above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The part of the eye with the highest concentration of cones is the:
a. macula lutea
b. fovea centralis
c. optic disc
d. choroid layer

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The “blind spot” of the eye is also called the:
a. macula lutea
b. fovea centralis
c. optic disc
d. choroid layer

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 212

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The vitreous humor:
a. is found in the anterior cavity
b. is found in the posterior chamber
c. is a watery fluid in front of the lens
d. both a and c above

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The external ear is called the:
a. auricle
b. tympanic membrane
c. pinna
d. both a and c above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The eardrum is:
a. also called the tympanic membrane
b. at the end of the auditory tube
c. part of the inner ear
d. both a and b above

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The sequence of the ossicles from the eardrum to the inner ear is:
a. malleus, stapes, incus
b. stapes, incus, malleus
c. malleus, incus, stapes
d. none of the above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. In the middle ear, the:
a. incus rests against the organ of Corti
b. tympanic membrane rests against the stapes
c. tympanic membrane rests against the incus
d. stapes rests against the oval window

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The structure that separates the middle ear from the inner ear is the:
a. tympanic membrane
b. oval window
c. ossicles
d. auditory canal

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The inner ear consists of three spaces, which are the:
a. perilymph, vestibule, and the cochlea
b. endolymph, vestibule, and the cochlea
c. vestibule, semicircular canals, and the cochlea
d. vestibule, semicircular canals, and the endolymph

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The perilymph is:
a. inside the semicircular canal
b. inside the cochlea
c. inside the bony labyrinth
d. both a and b above

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. Endolymph is:
a. inside the cochlea
b. inside the semicircular canals
c. just inside the bony labyrinth
d. both a and b above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The sense of balance:
a. is classified as a proprioceptor
b. occurs in the cochlea
c. occurs in the ossicles
d. is classified as a mechanoreceptor

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The sense of balance occurs in the:
a. ossicles
b. semicircular canals
c. vestibule
d. both b and c above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The specific organ of hearing is called the:
a. cochlea
b. semicircular canal
c. organ of Corti
d. tympanic membrane

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The sense of taste is classified as a:
a. proprioceptor
b. chemoreceptor
c. mechanoreceptor
d. none of the above

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 216

TOP:  The taste receptors

 

  1. The cells responsible for the sense of taste are the:
a. taste buds
b. papillae cells
c. salivary cells
d. gustatory cells

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 216

TOP:  The taste receptors

 

  1. The four taste sensations are:
a. sweet, salty, fruity, bitter
b. sweet, salty, bitter, sour
c. sweet, sour, fruity, salty
d. sweet, fruity, bitter, sour

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 217

TOP:  The taste receptors

 

  1. The sense of smell is classified as:
a. a proprioceptor
b. a chemoreceptor
c. a mechanoreceptor
d. none of the above

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 218

TOP:  The smell receptors

 

  1. The olfactory receptors:
a. also assist in the sense of taste
b. are able to respond to four primary odors
c. are not sensitive because of the location of the receptors
d. all of the above

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 218       TOP:  The taste receptors

 

  1. The sense of smell is:
a. sensitive
b. easily adapted
c. can respond to chemicals dissolved in water
d. all of the above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 218

TOP:  The smell receptors

 

  1. The sense of smell is able to stimulate vivid memories because the olfactory tract passes through the:
a. hypothalamus
b. limbic
c. cerebellum
d. brainstem

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 218|Page: 219

TOP:  The smell receptors

 

  1. Which of the following sensations is generated by a general sense organ?
a. touch
b. taste
c. equilibrium
d. both a and c above

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 205

TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. Which of the following sensations is generated by a special sense?
a. touch
b. taste
c. pressure
d. all of the above

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 205

TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. Which of the following is not considered one of the layers of the eye?
a. retina
b. sclera
c. iris
d. choroid

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 208

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Which of the following is not part of the choroid layer?
a. iris
b. cornea
c. ciliary muscle
d. all of the above are part of the choroid layer

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209|Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Which of the following is not true about the senses of taste and smell?
a. both are chemoreceptors
b. both contribute to the sense of taste
c. chemicals must be dissolved to stimulate the receptor
d. both respond to four primary stimuli

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 216|Page: 218

TOP:  The taste receptors|The smell receptors

 

  1. The vestibular nerve contains a nerve from the:
a. semicircular canals
b. vestibule
c. cochlea
d. both a and b above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  Inner ear

 

  1. Which sensation is not sensed by a general sense organ?
a. temperature
b. equilibrium
c. touch
d. all of the above are sensed by general sense organs

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 205

TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. Which sensation is not sensed by a special sense organ?
a. smell
b. equilibrium
c. taste
d. all of the above are sensed by special sense organs

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 205

TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. Which of the following is not true of a general sense organ?
a. They are microscopic in size.
b. They respond to touch and pressure.
c. They are grouped in a localized area.
d. All of the above are true of general sense organs.

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 205

TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. This is a functional characteristic of all sense organs:
a. must be able to detect a stimulus
b. must be able to detect a change in the intensity of the stimulus
c. must be able to change the stimulus into a nerve impulse
d. all of the above

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 205|Page: 207

TOP:  Converting a stimulus into a sensation

 

  1. A condition where the lens of the eye becomes milky in appearance and loses its transparency is called:
a. a cataract
b. presbyopia
c. otitis media
d. glaucoma

 

ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  Choroid

 

  1. An infection of the middle ear is called:
a. a cataract
b. presbyopia
c. otitis media
d. glaucoma

 

ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  Middle ear

 

  1. An increase in pressure inside the eye is called:
a. a cataract
b. presbyopia
c. otitis media
d. glaucoma

 

ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 211

TOP:  Retina

 

  1. The “farsightedness” of old age is called:
a. a cataract
b. presbyopia
c. otitis media
d. glaucoma

 

ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  Choroid

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. General sense organs are characterized by large complex organs or localized groupings of specialized receptors.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 205

TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. One of the main functions of a sense organ is to change a physical stimulus into an electrical signal.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 207

TOP:  Converting a stimulus into a sensation

 

  1. General sense organs are found throughout the body but are most concentrated in the internal organs.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  General sense organs

 

  1. Specialized receptors found near the point of junction between tendons and muscles are called mechanoreceptors.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  General sense organs

 

  1. Muscle spindles can be classified as proprioceptors.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  General sense organs

 

  1. Golgi tendon receptors and muscle spindles are both proprioceptors but are able to sense different things.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  General sense organs

 

  1. Meissner’s corpuscles respond to pain.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 206

TOP:  Table 9-1—General sense organs

 

  1. Ruffini’s corpuscles respond to touch and pressure.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 206

TOP:  Table 9-1—General sense organs

 

  1. Pacinian corpuscles respond to deep pressure.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 206

TOP:  Table 9-1—General sense organs

 

  1. The highest concentration of general sense organs is in the epidermis of the skin.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 206

TOP:  Table 9-1—General sense organs

 

  1. You are able to distinguish the difference between lifting a 20-lb weight and a 50-lb weight because of the Golgi tendon receptors.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 206

TOP:  Table 9-1—General sense organs

 

  1. The cornea is considered part of the sclera.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 206

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The iris is considered part of the sclera.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The lacrimal gland produces tears that keep the eyes moist.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The pupil is the colored part of the eye.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The iris is actually a muscle in the choroid layer.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. In very dim light the circular fibers of the iris contract, causing the pupil to dilate.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 210       TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Presbyopia is a term for the nearsightedness of old age.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Cataracts may be caused by exposure to the ultraviolet radiation of the sun.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. A cataract is a condition in which the cornea becomes less transparent and “milky” in appearance.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Dim light is able to stimulate the rods in the eye.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Colorblindness is a malfunction of the cones of the eye.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 213

TOP:  Clinical Application| Color Blindness

 

  1. Cones are used for day vision or vision in bright light.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. There are three kinds of cones, each sensitive to a different color: red, yellow, or blue.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The retina is the innermost layer of the eye.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The yellowish area near the center of the retina is called the fovea centralis.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The greatest concentration of rods is found in the macula lutea.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Looking directly at an object in bright light would give us greater visual acuity because the light would be focused on the fovea centralis.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. One of the functions of the fluids in the eye is to focus light.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Aqueous humor is the watery fluid in the posterior chamber of the eye.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Vitreous humor is the thick fluid in the posterior chamber of the eye.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                            REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The potentially blinding condition called glaucoma can occur if the fluid pressure of the eye drops too low.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 211

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The optic disc is able to respond only to bright light.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 212

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The nerve impulse of the eye begins when light enters through the iris of the eye and ends in the occipital lobe of the brain. This is called the visual pathway.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 211|Page: 212

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The external ear has two parts, the auricle and the pinna.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The tympanic membrane is at the end of the auditory canal.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The ceruminous glands produce ear wax.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The ossicles are in the middle ear.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The handle of the incus attaches to the inside of the eardrum.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The stapes presses against the oval window.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The external auditory canal connects the throat to the middle ear and can allow the spread of infection from the throat to the middle ear.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 214       TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The inner ear is responsible for the sense of hearing and equilibrium.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The bony labyrinth is divided into three parts: the cochlea, the vestibule, and the semicircular canals.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The membranous labyrinth is filled with endolymph.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The crista ampullaris is stimulated when you move your head.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The tympanic membrane is considered the organ of hearing.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. The organ of Corti is considered the organ of hearing.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. Specialized cells on the tongue called taste buds provide the sense of taste.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 216

TOP:  The taste receptors

 

  1. Papillae are microscopic receptors that can be found on the taste buds.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 216

TOP:  The taste receptors

 

  1. Gustatory cells are responsible for the sense of taste.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 216

TOP:  The taste receptors

 

  1. There are only four taste sensations.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 217

TOP:  The taste receptors

 

  1. Much of our sense of taste is actually our sense of smell.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 218       TOP:  The taste receptors

 

  1. The olfactory sense is very sensitive and takes a long time to adapt.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 218

TOP:  The smell receptors

 

  1. The olfactory receptors are located in the upper part of the nasal cavity.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 218

TOP:  The smell receptors

 

  1. Because the olfactory nerve passes through the hypothalamus, which is important in memory and emotion, odor can often stimulate vivid memories.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 218|Page: 219

TOP:  The smell receptors

 

  1. Senses can react to changes in both our internal and external environment.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 205

TOP:  Introduction

 

  1. Sensations of touch and pain are usually generated by special senses.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 205

TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. Equilibrium, temperature, and pressure are sensations generated by general sense organs.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 205

TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. Most of the free nerve endings are found in the epithelial layers of the body.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 206

TOP:  Table 9-1—General sense organs

 

  1. The sensation of taste and the perception of taste occur in different parts of the body.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 207

TOP:  Converting a stimulus into a sensation

 

  1. General senses are evenly distributed over the surface of the body.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  General sense organs

 

  1. The conjunctiva is the clear part of the sclera of the eye.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Dilation of the pupil is caused by the contraction of the iris.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209|Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. In bright light, the iris muscles would tend to contract.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 209|Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The ciliary muscle affects the eye’s ability to focus.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 209       TOP:  The eye

 

  1. If the iris muscles are contracted, the rods of the eye are probably being used to see.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 209|Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The ossicles are named based on their shape.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. Infections in the throat can cause otitis media by moving through the eustachian tube.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. Only special sense organs can be classified as encapsulated.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 205

TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. Only general sense organs are classified as either encapsulated or unencapsulated.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 205

TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. Going from most external to most internal, the layers of the eye would be sclera, choroid, and retina.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Application   REF:  Page: 208       TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The function of the lacrimal gland is to produce aqueous humor for the interior of the eye.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Glaucoma occurs when too much vitreous humor builds up in the eye.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 211

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. The vestibular nerve joins with the cochlear nerve to from cranial nerve VIII.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. If the eyeball is too short, a condition called hyperopia, or farsightedness, can exist.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 212

TOP:  Clinical Application: Focusing Problems

 

  1. Astigmatism is caused by an eyeball that is too elongated.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 212

TOP:  Clinical Application: Focusing Problems

 

  1. Myopia is another name for nearsightedness.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 212

TOP:  Clinical Application: Focusing Problems

 

  1. The sensory pathway for proprioceptors passes through the thalamus.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  Converting a stimulus into a sensation

 

  1. The sensory pathway for proprioceptors passes through the cerebellum.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  Converting a stimulus into a sensation

 

  1. The sensory pathway for both proprioceptors and cutaneous receptors passes through the spinal cord.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  Converting a stimulus into a sensation

 

  1. The root hair plexuses are associated with deep pressure and vibration.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  General sense organs

 

  1. Lasers can be used to sculpt the lens to help treat cataracts.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 208

TOP:  Sclera

 

  1. The malleus rest against the oval window of the middle ear and helps transmit vibrations.

 

ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  Middle ear

 

  1. The stimulation of taste buds travel primarily through the cranial nerves VII and IX to a special area of the cerebral cortex.

 

ANS: T                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 218

TOP:  The taste receptors

 

MATCHING

 

Match each of the following terms with its function or description.

a. Sclera
b. Cornea
c. Retina
d. Rods
e. Cones
f. Iris
g. Pupil
h. Choroid
i. Conjunctiva
j. Lens

 

 

  1. Sometimes called the window of the eye

 

  1. Colored part of the eye

 

  1. Hole in the eye that lets light in

 

  1. Layer of the eye that keeps light from scattering in the eye

 

  1. Structures in the retina that are able to respond to color

 

  1. White of the eye

 

  1. Mucous membrane covering part of the sclera

 

  1. Structure that is changed in shape by ciliary muscles to facilitate focus of light

 

  1. Innermost layer of the eye

 

  1. Structures in the retina that respond in dim light

 

  1. ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 208

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. ANS: G                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. ANS: H                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. ANS: E                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 208

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. ANS: I                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 209

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. ANS: J                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

Match each of the following terms with its function or description.

a. Tympanic membrane
b. Malleus
c. Stapes
d. Semicircular canal
e. Endolymph
f. Perilymph
g. Organ of Corti
h. Oval window
i. Pinna
j. Auditory tube

 

 

  1. Ossicle that rests against the eardrum

 

  1. Another term for the external ear

 

  1. Thicker fluid in the inner ear

 

  1. Structure that gives us our sense of balance

 

  1. Ossicle that rests against the oval window

 

  1. Another term for the eardrum

 

  1. Specific organ of hearing

 

  1. Separates the middle ear from the inner ear

 

  1. Thinner fluid in the inner ear

 

  1. Connects the throat to the middle ear

 

  1. ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. ANS: I                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. ANS: E                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. ANS: G                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. ANS: H                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214| Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. ANS: J                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 214

TOP:  The ear

 

Match each of the following terms with its function or description.

a. General sense organ
b. Pacinian corpuscle
c. Mechanoreceptor
d. Proprioceptor
e. Photoreceptor
f. Papillae
g. Free nerve ending
h. Special sense organ
i. Gustatory cells
j. Olfactory receptors
k. Golgi tendon receptor

 

 

  1. General sense organ that responds to pain and temperature

 

  1. Microscopic sense organ distributed all over the body

 

  1. Chemoreceptor responsible for the sense of taste

 

  1. Receptor that responds to light

 

  1. Receptor that provides information on position or movement of body parts

 

  1. Taste buds are located here

 

  1. Example of a mechanoreceptor

 

  1. Chemoreceptor for the sense of smell

 

  1. Example of a proprioceptor

 

  1. Sense organ that has receptors grouped in a localized area or in complex organs

 

  1. General sense organ that is activated by stimuli that deform or change the shape of the receptor

 

  1. ANS: G                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 206

TOP:  Table 9-1—General sense organs

 

  1. ANS: A                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  General sense organs

 

  1. ANS: I                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 216

TOP:  The taste receptors

 

  1. ANS: E                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 211

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. ANS: D                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  General sense organs

 

  1. ANS: F                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 216

TOP:  The taste receptors

 

  1. ANS: B                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  General sense organs

 

  1. ANS: J                     DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 218

TOP:  The smell receptors

 

  1. ANS: K                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  General sense organs

 

  1. ANS: H                   DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 205

TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. ANS: C                    DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:   Page: 207

TOP:  General sense organs

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Distinguish between a general and a special sense.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 205

TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. Give examples of a photoreceptor, a chemoreceptor, a mechanoreceptor, and a proprioceptor.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 205      TOP:  Classification of sense organs

 

  1. What information is provided by proprioceptors?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 207      TOP:  General sense organs

 

  1. Describe or give the function of the following structures: sclera, cornea, iris, pupil, ciliary muscle, choroid layer, rods, and cones.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 208| Page: 210

TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Explain how the lens and the ciliary muscles work to focus the eye on distant or near objects.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 209| Page: 210                                TOP:   The eye

 

  1. People with macular degeneration (a degeneration of the macula lutea) are told not to look directly at what they want to see. Explain why this would help them see.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 210      TOP:  The eye

 

  1. What causes the blind spot in the eye?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 212      TOP:  The eye

 

  1. Describe or give the function of the following structures: tympanic membrane, ossicles, oval window, semicircular canals, and organ of Corti.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 213| Page: 215

TOP:  The ear

 

  1. What is the auditory tube, and what is its role in otitis media?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Synthesis       REF:  Page: 214      TOP:  The ear

 

  1. Describe the inner ear. Where are perilymph and endolymph found?

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                            REF:              Page: 215      TOP:    The ear

 

  1. Explain the functioning of the sense of balance and equilibrium.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 215      TOP:  The ear

 

  1. Explain the functioning of the sense of hearing. Explain how the sound waves are transmitted to the cochlea.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 215| Page: 216                                TOP:   The ear

 

  1. Describe the functioning of the sense of taste.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 216| Page: 217                                TOP:   The taste receptors

 

  1. List the sensations of taste.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Memorization                                           REF:              Page: 217      TOP:    The taste receptors

 

  1. Describe the functioning of the sense of smell.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 218      TOP:  The smell receptors

 

  1. Explain anatomically why the sense of smell is so strongly linked with memory and emotion.

 

ANS:

(Answers may vary)

 

DIF:   Application    REF:  Page: 218| Page: 219                                TOP:   Special sense organs

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